How the 49ers could use the Dolphins’ first-round draft pick

If the Dolphins make a bad decision and trade their top draft picks for Jim Harbaugh, who should the 49ers draft with the Dolphins first-rounder, No.19?

If he’s healthy, I say the 49ers should take Marqise Lee. If Lee is not healthy, I say the Niners should take Allen Robinson.

But if Kelvin Benjamin is available, the 49ers probably should take him. He’d give the offense two things it needs — a deep threat and a red zone threat.

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    1. Look, Damon Bruce, or whatever his name is, crossed a line today in his satire/criticism
      of Grant/Lowell. Enough of this guy already. I wouldn’t have been tuning into 1050, were it not for the ball game on 680. This Damon guy was horrible, simply horrible.

      1. Really? you still feel this way after reading this article or what ever the F it is?

        Lets talk about what happens if a monkey crawls out of my butt, about the same likely hood as this trade going down.

        Praag was at the MIT Sloan conference.

    1. If the niners trade harbaugh then in the seasons following…we are no longer wondering if the niners will be trading up but rather if we will be trading down.

        1. Maybe the Press D could trade you for a couple water bottles and new set of ideas.
          I simply don’t get the taking a non story and making it bigger than anyone really cares about. Do you think your readers really care or is this another Cohn way to express a personal vendetta against Harbaugh?

          1. The potential trading of Harbaugh is the biggest story out there. If I were Jed York, I would be meeting with Stephen Ross right now. The Dolphins are the most likely team to trade picks for Harbaugh. We already know they offered Harbaugh more money than the 49ers did three years ago.

          2. Except that it’s not a story. That is why many are criticizing you right now. You are keeping alive a non story that has already been debunked by the team. The only story here is the tweets and derision being directed at you for continuing with this.

    2. Who do the 49ers replace Jim Harbaugh with? That should be the question, not how they’ll spend their new extra pick(s)

        1. Replacing Harbaugh would be easy? I hate to keep referring to your youth and inexperience regarding this game Grant, but statements like this make it impossible. I don’t think you realize just how incredible this run by Harbaugh is. No HC in modern NFL history has achieved the level of success Harbaugh has. This black and white perspective you and Jack seem to have regarding this topic is unrealistic.

          He needs to win a SB in order to be great or get the raise he wants according to you two, yet lesser Coaches like Jeff Fisher are currently making 7 mill per year. You also need to stop acting like he wants to be paid more than Carroll the SB winning HC, because Carroll was paid his current 7 mill salary BEFORE winning the SB. He will most likely get a raise now that he’s actually won it, so Harbaugh asking for more than that is not out of line considering his winning percentage is tops in the league since he started 3 years ago.

          Much like Kaepernick, the standard you are holding Harbaugh too in order to get the money he deserves is unreasonable. If it were easy to find successful HC’s then teams wouldn’t be firing them at the rate they are, and we certainly wouldn’t have gone through the 10 years of misery we saw after Mariucci was canned.

          Tom Coughlin has won two SB’s with wildcard teams. Does that make him a great HC considering he’s had a lot of average teams and ones that didn’t make the playoffs at all? Mike Tomlin won a SB with Bill Cowhers team and hasn’t won a SB since but the Steelers will stick with him as they did with Cowher and Knoll before him because they understand how hard it is to find good HC’s and that success usually comes from a solid foundation and Coaching staff.

          Jim Tomsula is an unknown as a HC at the NFL level. You might as well throw Geep Chryst and Tom Rathman in there at this point. It’s not an easy job which is why so many fail. David Shaw has shown no interest in becoming an NFL HC either.

          HC’s are not plug and play Grant.

  1. Grant,

    They’d have 6 picks in the top 94, but they would’ve lost one of the top five NFL coaches (top three, if you agree with Tim Kawakami, which I do, but I’ll be conservative and stick with top five).

    1. How is he top-five? No Super Bowl wins and a 1-2 record in championship games coaching the top roster in football. Many coaches have a more impressive resume.

      1. See Scooter’s comments on Cowher for a point of view definition of a successful HC.
        Your ‘Half Empty’ “1-2 in Conf Championship Games”, could be seen as ‘Half Full’: “Went to the Conf Championship Game in every year as a Head Coach.”

          1. And so since he hasn’t won the big one in all of his three seasons as a head coach he’s not a top-line coach?

            Here is a list of other top (SB winning) coaches in the NFL and the number of seasons it took to win the big one:
            - Mike Tomlin: 2nd season
            - Sean Payton: 4th season
            - John Harbaugh: 5th season
            - Bill Belichick: 7th season
            - Pete Carroll: 8th season
            - Tom Coughlin: 12th season

            Bill Parcells won it in his 4th season. As I mentioned yesterday, Cowher won it in his 14th.

            I guess that makes Tomlin the only top line coach of that list as he was the only one that won it all in 3 years or less. Of course, of the above list, only Tomlin took over a SB winning squad (they won it in in Cowher’s last year, the year before Tomlin took over).

            Jim Harbaugh took over a squad that had been under .500 for 8 years. You can talk all you want about having the talent in place, but that talent was doing diddly before Jim took over.

            1. Jim Harbaugh didn’t draft Aldon Smith or NaVorro Bowman. Those two changed the defense from very good to dominant.

              Harbaugh has had his chances in big games — against the Giants, against the Ravens and against the Seahawks.

          2. “Actually it’s about being close enough to try to win the Superbowl as often as possible in the “cap” era.”

            Are you serious?

          3. No doubt those acquisitions helped Jack. It doesn’t make it any less impressive that he took the team to the NFCCG in a lock out season as a rookie NFL head coach.

            Since then he’s gone to the NFCCG twice more, winning once. Also very good. Excellence would have been winning it all, but still very very good work in three years. Trying to paint Harbaugh as anything less than a great head coach just doesn’t fit the achievements.

            And yes, great head coaching is about getting your team into position to have a shot at the title each year – get to the playoffs and hope you catch fire at the right time. If you keep getting there and never win it then its a problem, sure. But saying after 3 seasons he can’t do it seems nuts to me. There are 12 other teams with talented rosters in the playoffs too. All it takes is one of them to catch fire at the right time too.

            It is worth noting that Harbaugh also boasts a record in his three years of only losing in the playoffs to the eventual SB winner. Why is that note-worthy? Because it shows he only gets beat by extremely good teams playing hot football at the right time. It doesn’t take much of a stretch to believe he can lead a team all the way too.

          4. I would classify Harbaugh as very good. For me a coach without a championship is not great.

            Would you consider Andy Reid a great coach? I don’t.

          5. Not a good comparison. Andy Reid has much larger body of work to base that opinion on. It’s now been 15 years and despite having 10 winning seasons in that time he’s only been to the Championship Game once. That is a long term effort in futility. He deserves to be considered good but not great.

            In 3 years Harbaugh has been to the NFCCG 3 times.

          6. Scooter,

            Reid’s had the Eagles in the NFC Championship Game four years in a row, in his first six years as their coach.

            1. Very interesting. Four years in a row and most football fans already have forgotten that. Goes to show that no one will care about Harbaugh’s resume 10 years from now if he never wins the big one.

          7. Ah yes, my bad, so he did. Still, he’s been at it for 15 years – the body of work is there to show he’s consistently been unable to get his team over the hump.

            Jim’s been at it for 3 years. Far too soon to say he’s not capable of getting his team to win the SB. Obviously until he does he hasn’t proven he can do it either. But at this point to say he can’t do it seems very premature.

            1. I never said he can’t do it, just that it’s fair to wonder whether he can do it. He’s had his chances. The burden of proof is on him.

          8. Jack and Grant, you are suggesting that Harbaugh isn’t a top-line coach because he’s not won a SB (a very good but not great coach). The implication, intended or otherwise, is you think he will not be able to do it – if you thought him capable of doing it you would think he’s a great coach that hasn’t gotten there yet.

            I’ll put it another way – if he wins the SB this season is he all of a sudden a great coach? Is it literally the ring on the finger that makes the coach great, and until then you can only be very good? Does that mean Bill Parcells, Bill Cowher, Bill Belichik, etc, etc, were only good coaches up until they won the SB, then they magically transformed into great coaches?

            1. Yes, of course. Greatness is an accomplishment, not a projection. You actually have to win the ring to be great. You play the game to win the ring.

          9. Scooter,

            I think you’ve read enough of my stuff to know that I don’t beat around the bush. Please don’t project what you think I mean.

            I never said Harbaugh can’t win a Super Bowl. He may some day, and if he does I will think of him as great.

          10. So Parcells, Cowher, Belichick etc were only good until they won it then? I wonder what changed about the way they coached in those seasons to reach that pinnacle of coaching greatness. I’m guessing not a lot. They were probably the same guys coaching pretty much the same stuff they were beforehand, maybe with a few tweaks based on learnings along the way.

            After three years on the job it seems highly premature to be saying anything about someone’s greatness if the key to greatness is winning SB’s. That is a retrospective measure. At the end of a coach’s career, if they don’t have any championships to point to then it is fair enough to say they were good, even very good, but not great.

            1. You seem to think those coaches were born great. Greatness is an achievement, and there is only one way to achieve it. Calling Harbaugh great is inaccurate and premature.

          11. The greatness comes not when things go always good for you. But the greatness comes when you’re really tested, when you take some knocks, some disappointments, when sadness comes. Because only if you’ve been in the deepest valley can you ever know how magnificent it is to be on the highest mountain……

          12. I’m not saying they were born great, they had to work at it like anyone else. But it is the individual’s personality and talent, not their achievements, that make them great. Achievements are merely the path to greatness as measured by memory and history books.

            They didn’t magically become great coaches the day they put on their SB ring. What made these guys great coaches were the attributes they brought to their teams. They were great coaches, which in turn led to them winning a SB in time.

          13. When it is all said and done he may well be Grant. But don’t confuse physical talent with football talent. He’s yet to turn his elite physical talent into elite football talent.

            No, a better argument would be JJ Watt. Is he great? You better believe it. Hasn’t won anything though.

          14. Doesn’t matter how you choose to slice it Grant, getting this team to three straight championships in your first three years is unprecedented, irrespective of the players you do or don’t have. Unprecedented equates to great….A Super Bowl would make him greater….

          15. I agree, great is over-used, that is why I used “top-line” to start with. I think Jim Harbaugh deserves to be considered in the top echelon of current coaches. I believe his record over the past 3 seasons is better than any other coach over that span.

            1. Regular season record isn’t the determining factor. Why should Harbaugh make more money than Pete Carroll or any Super Bowl winner?

              Also, how can anyone become great in just three seasons?

          16. We might be talking semantics over the use of the word great now. I think you can be considered in the top echelon of your profession after 3 seasons, if you’ve put together a strong body of work in that period. He’s done better than any coach these past 3 seasons in terms of wins, and keep in mind only 3 coaches have won the SB over that period. As for paying him on par or similar to a SB winning coach, it is about projection – the body of work he has shown so far leads you to believe he’s going to be one of the better ones.

          17. Jack Hammer February 28, 2014 at 8:29 pm
            Great is such an overused word nowadays.
            ——————————–
            Great is good, but amazing, now that would be great!

          18. Coaches like players are paid on performance. There hasn’t been a better HC in the league the past 3 years than Harbaugh. The record says it, and the playoff runs say it.

            1. Tom Coughlin, John Harbaugh and Pete Carroll have been better. It’s all about the rings. Ask Peyton Manning.

              Until proven otherwise, Jim Harbaugh is a very good coach and a high-level loser like Andy Reid. Unfortunately for Harbaugh, he’s been a high-level loser coaching the best roster in the NFL. At least 10 coaches could have won a Super Bowl the past three years coaching this roster.

              You could make a strong argument that Bruce Arians and Chip Kelly are better coaches than Jim Harbaugh.

          19. Tom Coughlin, John Harbaugh and Pete Carroll have been better. It’s all about the rings. Ask Peyton Manning.

            No they haven’t been better. They’ve each managed to win a SB by being hot at the right time and none had the start to their NFL Coaching career that Jim Harbaugh has had. Coughlin alternated the SB wins with not making the playoffs which show just how lucky they were to hit their stride at the right time in the years they did win. John was a perennial loser in the playoffs until they finally broke through. Pete Carroll got fired twice in the NFL and started slowly in his 3rd go around before finally winning a Championship.

            Until proven otherwise, Jim Harbaugh is a very good coach and a high-level loser like Andy Reid. Unfortunately for Harbaugh, he’s been a high-level loser coaching the best roster in the NFL. At least 10 coaches could have won a Super Bowl the past three years coaching this roster.

            Strictly your opinion and not supported by any kind of factual information. I disagree and find it amusing that you believe so many Coaches are better than a guy who has won every where he’s gone and don’t have the resume he has put together in 3 years of pro Coaching. Andy Reid the loser is making 7.5 mill a year by the way. Harbaugh is not out of line in asking for 8.

            You could make a strong argument that Bruce Arians and Chip Kelly are better coaches than Jim Harbaugh.

            You could Grant because you defy reality with many of your takes.

      2. Grant,

        How many HCs have changed the culture of a losing organization and had the success JH has had in their first three years?

        I’m not sure which NFL HC I would rather the 49ers have, right now. There are several that I’d be fine with, but not one that I would prefer clearly over JH.

        1. Andy Reid comes to mind. If I use the thesis of your argument then Kansas City is the point you’re making. A losing organization that was turned around in its first year by its head coach.

      3. You lose respect when you make these dumb statements.

        Playing along with your speculation, I’d suggest they take the Dolphins #19 and their #50 to package with the 49ers own #77 and move up to trade with the Buccaneers at pick 7 and select Mr. Watkins…..

        1. Playing along with your speculation, I’d suggest they take the Dolphins #19 and their #50 to package with the 49ers own #77 and move up to trade with the Buccaneers at pick 7 and select Mr. Watkins…..

          I don’t think Watkins is on Blake’s radar Razor simply because he doesn’t have long arms.

      4. Are you serious? His record through three seasons is on par with the best in NFL history. His team is the best team in football over the last 3 years.

        You ignore his historic record through three seasons and cherrypick three conference championship games to argue he’s not among the top 5, which makes you exactly like the people who bash Kaepernick for “not winning the big one” and arguing that he doesn’t deserve a big contract. Yeah, Harbaugh has more losses in conference championship games than most coaches. Just like Kap has a worse record in Super Bowls than, say, Jay Cutler or Tony Romo…..

          1. Grant,

            Much of the time, very thin margins separate winning and losing in the post season. So, no, it’s not only about winning the SB for me. More important for me, is that the 49ers are relevant year in, and year out.

            On the other hand, if JH doesn’t win a SB in one of the next two years, my opinion about him being one of the top five (or three) NFL HCs may need to be revised.

          2. I think Grant and Jack win this round. Harbaugh is not great. Greatness is earned and Harbaugh hasn’t earned it. To be a great coach, you have to be able to coach your team above the hump and win the Super Bowl. He clearly hasn’t shown the coaching it takes to not meltdown near the goal line last 2 years.

      5. You’re an idiot for writing that the only coach in the history of the NFL to go to 3 straight champs and a Superbowl in his first 3 seasons is superseded in résumé by more than a couple of coaches.

        Harbaugh’s not a clutch coach, but if you’re looking at recent playoff history, neither is Belichick, nor Peyton. In fact, the only proven clutch coach in the NFL is Coughlin.

        1. You’re right. I missed the fact that Coughlin out on the field on that 4th and 19 play clutching the ball to a scrubs helmet. I also missed him doing the tip toe finger tip catch to make it possible for himto with the his second SB.

          He’s a good coach, and he’s had some luck at exactly the right time.

      6. Top roster? Maybe top roster defensively, but not offensively with a indecisive QB and no speed/game breakers on offense.
        One real take it to the house player in Vernon Davis but he is a TE. He cannot break open a game when he is needed to stay in and pass protect on long down and distances.

          1. Every unit isn’t A+, but there are no holes on the 49ers roster.

            Not true Grant. The team needs a backup QB to put some pressure on Kaep, a change-of-pace RB, a speedster WR to help stretch the field, some depth and heir apparents to Boldin and Crabtree, a CB that can play opposite of Brock, and potentially a replacement at SS. We may also need a new kicker and someone for the return game besides James.

        1. MWDynasty – Philbin is the poor coach who’s son drowned a couple years ago. He was reported missing then was found in a river (alcohol in system). Sad story, can’t remember if he was a teenager or not?

      1. They wouldn’t hire him Crab, even TMZ drops a topic after it’s clearly dead unlike our host.

  2. After being treated to a season full of “if you take away Gore’s best runs…”, it’s starting to look like we may be in for an offseason of Harbaugh trade speculations. What genius will Grant think of next?

    1. Preach. If you take away Harbaugh’s record in non-championship/Super Bowls, he is just a pathetic 1-3 overall. Loser….

  3. Grant, I’m telling you for your own good (because I really want this site to provide decent content) to stop with your juvenile retrenchment behavior. its unprofessional and an embarrassment to the Press Democrat. Some page clicks aren’t worth it. You do this all the time. You get called on a BS post and you double down as if to make a defiant statement. Grow up!

    I have no problem with your initial post about York going to Miami. You prefaced it by saying that you’re purely speculating. That’s fine. But York called you on it and nothing new has developed. So let it alone.

    There’s so many other things you could discuss. Kilgore’s contract? You watch film to some extent. Does Kilgore’s work look to you like he’s ready to take on the starting Center responsibilities? Maybe he or Looney are being prepped as possible Left Guard replacements for Iupati? possibilities of Kaepnernick’s proposed extension. You post a lot about draft prospects in your response to comments. Do you think the Niners should extend Hunter? Isn’t there backfield crowded? Does Hunter’s production warrant an extension. Is he easily replaceable?

      1. it’s juvenile to continue to post about something that you know has no substance at this point. again, whenever you get called out on something, you always post more about it. that the whole point of the latter posts is simply to beat a dead horse. it’s not like I’m alone with my reaction to these posts.

          1. Do you think it fun to demean the work of professionals in a field (football) where you have no foundation of experience? If you were more mature it might occur to you that building your own foundation should be a first priority.

          2. as I said, i had no problem with your initial post. you reported and speculated on 49er officials going to Miami. we discovered that it was just Jed and his family and Baalke and Marathe were not with him. that’s fine. that’s factual information. then you speculated a bit. that’s fine. in your initial post you stated that you were blatantly speculating. but after it was proved to be a non-story (at this point), you kept posting about it like some gossip website with nothing substantial to work with. you were called out by posters and York about the article. yet you continued to post about it with no new information. and it appears to be solely in an attempt to stir up the controversy which is disingenuous.

            you work for a respectable news paper. you’re a professional journalist.

      1. that’s been my guess too. But since we’re into wild speculation; let’s at least talk about wild football speculation. there are some good Guards on the free agent market and I wonder if any of them might be possible on a cheap contract if for some reason they fall through the cracks. Remember last year when the extended Ian Williams and then signed Glenn Dorsey?

        1. The 49ers don’t need guards. They already have Snyder, Looney, Seymour, and about 3 guys from their PS or NFI list.

          The Williams and Dorsey deals were necessary because they were moving on from Sopoaga and RJF and didn’t have any other options on the roster.

          1. yeah, but are they ready to fill in for Iupati if they aren’t able or willing to resign him and decide to trade him?

            They had Ian Williams on the roster. He was pretty much the designated starter. If they just wanted another guy they could have gotten some one much cheaper than Dorsey. But there was value in Dorsey and hedging their bets with moving an unproven Williams to become a starter.

          2. Looney played quite well when asked last season against St Louis. His situation is very similar to that of Kilgore and Boone before him.

            Iupati isn’t going to be traded this season and he is a free agent next year.

  4. Grant, I have to admit, you were irritating me the past couple of days even though I understood what you were doing. But now, I’m actually getting entertained…seriously. Just reading the above comments give me some good laughs :) Thanks for that Grant!!!

  5. So what is a successful NFL HC? Who were the Great Ones?
    Shula- 1
    Cowher-1
    Lombardi-2 (yeah, the 1st two)
    Landry? Grant? Levy? Was Chuck Knox good? Don Coryell?
    John Madden? He suffered these slings and arrows too. Big John can’t win the Big One. Also, you can’t win it all with a Lefty. So he goes out and wins XI with Stabler. Then the song changed. But John didn’t win another one; was he just lucky that once?
    Brian Billick won a ring. Is he better than Coryell? Reid? Jim Harbaugh?

    1. Tom Coughlin won two SBs with rosters that had serious holes. Tom Flores won two SBs with Jim Plunkett. Harbaugh isn’t better than them.

      1. You are seriously going to say that Flores is better than JH? I don’t think too many people would agree with that take.

        I guess Barry Switzer is better than JH too, since he’s got one SB victory. If Switzer had lucked into a second SB victory, there would be no question of Switzer’s superiority to JH, right?

        As for Coughlin, how many years did he coach before winning his first SB? How many years has Coughlin needed to win his two SBs? How many times has Coughlin miss the playoffs?

          1. Grant,

            Using that logic, you should say that Switzer is better, as well. Is that what you think?

            Besides, you know who was at least the co-head coaching the Raiders at that point, don’t you? Flores can’t get full credit for winning those two SBs.

      2. Tom Coughlin had clearly lost the first one when on forth and 19 a hail Mary pass stuck to the helmet of a guy who was cut in the off season. That was some couching job.

        The the second one was won with what amounted to one of the greatest sideline catches I’ve ever seen — toes and fingertips.

        Both of these plays came at the miracle time in a games that were lost. Historic coaching. Give Harbough two plays like those and he has one Superbowl win for sure, and a very good chance to beat Denver for the second win.

        Outstanding coaches also need some luck at the right time. Walsh’s last season is a good example where he was very lucky at least three times.

        1. Yep, good on Coughlin for being able to get his players to play great football in the back-end of the year in those two years he won it. But at the end of the day it was clutch plays by the players that won the day.

          Great coaches give players the confidence, morale and game plans to get their team in position to win the big one. Great players play big when the game is on the line.

    1. the extra official is there to make sure that there are two officials looking at the punter’s legs. Apparently, just having one official back there is not enough to make a distinction whether the punter was hit on his left or right leg.

  6. I’m in agreement with Grant , win a Super Bowl then ask for the moon… I’m seeing holes in his coaching that tell me he’ll never win the big one . Starting with that simplistic , incorporate no speed offense, that’s easy to defend

        1. I’m sorry NYniner, until we hear it from Jim, Trent and Jed on record, all of these talks about what Jim wants and what was offered to him are pure speculations.

    1. That’s easy. Let him work out his last two years and move on. So he must rank ahead of any couch who has ever been fired before his contract is finished. So Harbaugh is OK to be a caretaker for two years but not good enough be paid more than the third highest coach in the NFC Western Division.

      I realize that there are logical holes in this ranking but based on what I’ve read here, it’s where Harbaugh should be ranked.

  7. I heard a rumor that the 49ers have contacted Jon Gruden about filling the soon-to-be vacant HC position. His reply was that he would consider it if he was made the highest paid HC in the NFL along with escalators that would guarantee that he would always get $1.00 more than any other HC’s contract.

    After his response, Jed turns to Baalke and says, “Well, at least we got a lot of draft picks for you!”

  8. The difference in these close losses has been the coaching. Not the players. Even though he brought the Niners back from the dead, I don’t think he deserves the money until he can get over the hump.
    The SB was theirs and they were not prepared. He put a rookie QB and almost won it all, but in the end it looks foolish because they were clearly out-coach and lost to an inferior team.

    Against Seattle in the NFCCG, I hate to say it but Seattle is a slightly better team, but the Niners catch a few breaks and the coaching staff plays to win with a 10 pt lead.
    Granted Kaep made the same dumb throw, but he felt like he could with no consequences. That would not have happened with Coughlin.

    Niners have a stacked roster and people who think all we need is one more WR or CB can’t admit that another coach or more experienced QB would have been the difference in the Niners holding a 6th lombardi trophy.

  9. uhm…if harbaugh is traded….who is gonna be our coach? all those draft picks for shoddy coaching would just crush this franchise and send it back to mediocrity and underachieving.

          1. When was the last time a position coach became a HC and was successful?

            Don’t get me wrong, he seems like a great guy, and Harbaugh may not be the nicest guy, but personality doesn’t win in the NFL.

          2. Well, that does it. Baalke made a huge mistake hiring Harbaugh over Tomsula. He must not have known he had previous experience as a head coach in NFL Europe….Hell, all the teams looking for coaches have passed over Tomsula.

            1. Time has past. Harbaugh is not worth more than $5 million per year to the 49ers, especially if he doesn’t get along with the front office, especially if he freezes up at the end of championship games. Tomsula is a convenient alternative, especially if the 49ers can flip Harbaugh for high draft picks.

          3. Grant, why would other teams give up draft picks to get Harbaugh to coach their team if he’s not good enough to win a Super Bowl? The disconnect in the front office stems from the hermetically sealed envelope and the rest of the 2012 draft class. Remember, it’s a lot easier to get a suit, than it is a head coach. I sure wouldn’t want to be Tomsula. To be used as leverage within a family organization against the Captain of the Ship, would make me feel very uncomfortable….

            1. The Dolphins need Harbaugh to make them a winning team. They’re not yet worried about taking the final step.

          4. Yes sir, the Great John Madden. If you like I can put it another way for you. You can have the best grapes in the vinyard, but if you don’t know how to make the wine…..Harbaugh knows how to make the wine.

          5. Sorry about this Razor;

            Tomsula = Singletary. Fantastic positional coaches that shouldn’t try to be anything more then that.

            1. I’ve talked to players about him. They said he was a bad position coach, had very little to say.

              Tomsula is one of the best defensive line coaches in the NFL. He’s a real talent. And he’s a natural leader.

          6. @Grant says “The Dolphins need Harbaugh to make them a winning team. They’re not yet worried about taking the final step”.

            News flash for you Grant, anytime you’re a winning team, you are on pace to take the final step….

            1. The Dolphins are infatuated with Harbaugh, want him to turn their franchise around like he turned around Stanford and the Niners. They’ll pay for that. If it bears out that he can’t win the big one for them, either, they’ll regret their investment.

          7. I’ve talked to players about him. They said he was a bad position coach, had very little to say.
            ————————
            Singletary had very little to say? I find that hard to believe ;). He played with an acute sense of instinct propelled by a strong foundation of fundamental football. He’s a motivational speaker outside of football, it’s so hard to believe that someone with those talents had very little to say when talking about something he was/is clearly passionate about. He had a very close relationship with Willis, do you think if we asked him he would say that he was a bad position coach?

          8. Couple things. I’ve heard Ray Lewis say Singletary was an excellent position coach. And Marriucci HCed at Cal. This infatuation with Tomsula is so ridiculous.

          9. You keep saying Jim Harbaugh can’t “win the big one”, and that he “freezes up in big games” that is shamefully disengenuous on your part Grant. No evidence for that. You just hate Harbaugh irrationally.

            1. Harbaugh froze up in the NFC Championship against the Giants when he didn’t instruct Kyle Williams to fair catch everything after diving to catch a punt.

              Harbaugh froze up on the last play of the Super Bowl when he didn’t use a timeout to call a good play.

              Harbaugh froze up in the NFC Championship against the Seahawks on the last play when he didn’t use his final timeout to at least discuss the situation with Kaepernick.

          10. Are you really going to force me to school you up on the finer points of football? Harbaugh is a fantastic HC. Luck has something to do with it too. If you can’t see that, you don’t know football.

          11. Harbaugh froze up in the NFC Championship against the Giants when he didn’t instruct Kyle Williams to fair catch everything after diving to catch a punt.

            Why would he? You have a tight game that could be decided by a good return, so telling your return man to fair catch or stay away from everything takes that element away. If you’re going to do that you might as well not put anybody back and rush all 11. That’s certainly not freezing up by any stretch of the imagination.

            Harbaugh froze up on the last play of the Super Bowl when he didn’t use a timeout to call a good play.

            They had taken a TO earlier that screwed up a good play. They didn’t need to take a TO on the last play because they had plenty of time and knew what they wanted to do. Criticize the play call if you want, but saying he froze because he didn’t take a second TO in a span of two plays doesn’t make any sense.

            Harbaugh froze up in the NFC Championship against the Seahawks on the last play when he didn’t use his final timeout to at least discuss the situation with Kaepernick

            Again why would you need to? You’ve got plenty of time and a first down. There was no need to call a TO at that point. They got the play in and ran it. Criticize the play call if you want, but there was no issue with how Harbaugh handled that point in the game.

            I don’t think you understand what freezing under pressure means.

            1. Williams was not up to the moment. That was obvious. Harbaugh needed to manage the game and handle the punt returning situation, but he did nothing and it lost him the game.

              The last play in the Super Bowl was not a play, it was recess — run to the back pylon and I’ll throw it up. Kaepernick and Crabtree didn’t need Harbaugh for that one. A $6 or $7 million head coach makes sure his offense actually runs a play with the Super Bowl on the line. Call the timeout and call a better play.

              Again, the final play in the NFC Championship against the Seahawks was recess — I decide to throw it up to Crabtree before the snap. Harbaugh can’t let that happen. He’s the head coach and he has a timeout. Call it and call a better play, or call the timeout and tell Kaepernick not to underthrow the fade if that’s where he chooses to go.

              Harbaugh froze up in all three cases.

          12. The examples you are giving are not evidence of the HC freezing up. You are using hindsight to question play calls and nothing more. Calling a TO when one isn’t needed at that point is not freezing up. You don’t understand what the term means.

            1. Those are perfect examples. Timeouts were needed. An adjustment needed to be made in the punting game. You, sir, do not know what the term means.

          13. They are examples of hindsight Coaching by a young writer who is opinionated and lacks a complete understanding of the game he covers. You believing a TO should have been called does not make it so. When you have a first down at the 18 and 40 seconds on the clock you save TO’s; not waste them on a first down play. That is remedial football 101. A Coach who doesn’t call a TO he doesn’t need is not freezing, Choking or whatever other term you want to use.

          14. Grant, without wanting to rehash the whole “is Harbaugh a great coach” train of thought, I think you are on the right track with this argument as to what separates Harbaugh from being a Super Bowl winner. A coach’s actions and reactions are picked up by the players, and getting all jacked up in pressure moments will filter through to the players too. With the game on the line it is important to be amped up to a degree, but it still needs to be controlled. You still need to be clear headed and make quick, smart decisions.

            Harbaugh is not what I would consider a calming influence on the sidelines.

          15. He fights passionately for his players on the sideline, and with some of the calls that went against his team in 2013, I’m afraid I wouldn’t be calm either. Dungy was nice and calm, maybe he’s the guy you’re looking for…..

          16. Scooter,

            Tom Coughlin is one of the most emotional sideline Coaches in the game. Harbaugh is downright melancholy compared to his former HC in Chicago. How a HC reacts on the sidelines has little to do with player performance in my opinion.

            If winning a Championship is the line between greatness and very good, that means Mike Ditka and Brian Billick were both great HC’s. Jon Gruden was a great HC even though he had a losing record over his career in Tampa.

            Both Grant and Jack want to paint this in black and white terms, and you can’t.

          17. Nothing wrong with some fire in the belly of a coach razor. But when it comes to big moments, pressure moments, you want a leader that exudes confidence and calm. Not frantic yelling and screaming.

          18. Rocket, if you followed any of my discussion with Grant and Jack yesterday you’ll know I agree with you about the black and white use of SB rings as a measure of greatness for a coach that has been in the league just 3 years.

            But I strongly disagree with your take that a coach’s actions and reactions on the sideline do not filter through to the players in big moments. Or, more accurately, that when player’s are emotionally jacked up trying to win a big game in the dying moments, that a coach can’t provide a calming influence.

          19. Scooter,

            Emotional outbursts can be detrimental if the Coach loses his focus, but I haven’t seen that from Harbaugh at key times, and certainly not at the end of the SB or the NFCCG in Seattle.

          20. That is fair enough rocket. But do you think he looked calm, confident and in control of the game at the end of the SB and the NFCCG?

          21. Scooter,

            I think he was totally in control. The one issue he had was when he called the TO in the SB, which in hindsight probably wishes he didn’t.

          22. Rocket, I’ll admit straight up this is just my opinion, but there are two photos in this article that stand out to me.

            http://bleacherreport.com/articles/1910415-super-bowl-2014-teams-with-most-pressure-to-make-it-to-metlife-stadium

            The first one is the one of Harbaugh and Kaep in the SB. Harbaugh is looking up at the scoreboard with what looks to me a slightly worried look on his face, while Kaep is speaking to him.

            The other photo is the one of Walsh, firmly in control making a point to Joe Montana in a calm, measured way.

            Both are in game shots. One photo shows a leader in firm control of the situation. The other shows a leader looking slightly lost in the moment. My opinion, I readily admit, but that is how I see Harbaugh in pressure moments.

          23. And nor should he have razor! No, my point isn’t that he needs to be calm and docile on the sideline. Just that he needs to be measured and in control at pressure moments and make sure he is instilling calm and confidence in his players.

            Don’t believe you will win, know it.

          24. Scooter,

            You are entitled to that opinion, but don’t you think basing it on a still photo just a bit of a reach?

          25. Rocket, as I said, that is what I see when I watch Harbaugh. The still pic is simply a manner of presenting what I see to you. I am not basing my opinion on the still pic.

          26. Harbaugh has a great record, regular and post season. No doubt. But in the biggest games his team has come up short. This is simply one aspect I think he could improve on to help take his team to a SB ring.

          27. Ha, no arguments there razor – the validity of my argument comes solely down to personal opinion. No way to know for sure if either one of us is right or wrong.

          1. Jack there is an old saying in the wine business forgive me if my quote isn’t quite exact , it goes something like, you can have the finest grapes in the field but if you don’t have the right wine maker you will still end up with vinegar

          2. Isn’t it possible that once the recipe for the wine has been created another wine maker can take over and still make great wine?

          3. You could get another winemaker who will follow the recipe, and it would be very good. However, if you want the recipe to evolve and mature into the champion of the valley, you’d be better served in that accomplishment by retaining the original winemaker….

          4. Happy with adequate, hardly innovative. Shaw was exposed against Michigan State(as I said they would be)for the lack of innovative creativity. The Spartans stopped their power running game, and his only answer was to keep trying to run. No alternative plan. No will to create one. 21 runs to 7 passes in the second half? Against a team every bit as big and physical as you are? Not only is it poor coaching, it’s stubbornness. If that’s your winemaker, make sure you have multiple copies of the recipe in case you lose it…..

          5. I thought you two wanted to take the next step. Someone who does not squander opportunities? Creativity? Time manager? On the most important drive of the season, Shaw ran it four consecutive times against the nation’s top-ranked run defense. I was nice and called it stubborness before, this time the word I’ll use to decribe it is dumb….

          6. Interesting that you two would go to the Harbaugh tree to pick your next head coach considering how disillusioned you’ve become with the species. I on the other hand would much prefer hiring Kliff Kingsbury as the offensive coordinator, and grooming him for the job in a few years…

          7. @Hammer, Really? Disillusioned-to be disappointed in someone or something that one discovers to be less good than one had believed. Seems to describe you and Grants’ feelings towards Jimmy Joe…..

          8. Jack,

            You are talking out of both sides of your mouth which is why some are getting confused about exactly where you stand. You say Harbaugh is a very good Coach in one post and follow it up with how Shaw could replace him in the next. If you have a very good Coach, you don’t replace him, that’s the point.

          9. Razoreater March 1, 2014 at 10:33 am
            I thought you two wanted to take the next step. Someone who does not squander opportunities? Creativity? Time manager? On the most important drive of the season, Shaw ran it four consecutive times against the nation’s top-ranked run defense. I was nice and called it stubborness before, this time the word I’ll use to decribe it is dumb….

            Jack Hammer March 1, 2014 at 10:46 am
            I would want someone who is capable of building upon the foundation already set. Shaw has done that.

            Ha! Hammer, you sound like a spokesman for the Stanford PR department…..

          10. It’s not that hard to follow rocket. Harbaugh is a very good coach, but that doesn’t mean he can’t be replaced.

            I’m not in agreement with Grant that he should be traded now. My take is that if things get to the point where Jed is forced to make a decision the better choice is to keep Baalke.

          11. Actually it is hard to follow when you argue both ends Jack. In your desire not to be wrong about something you often try to cover points for both sides.

          12. rocket,

            You’re smarter than this I think.

            Here you go again.

            In my opinion Harbaugh is a very good coach. Not great.

            There is a lot of tension that may force York to choose between Harbaugh and Baalke.

            In my opinion the correct choice for York is to go with Baalke.

            If you still don’t understand why read my piece that I linked below.

            Saying that Harbaugh is good, but not irreplaceable is not talking out of both sides of my mouth.

          13. Jack, I agree with your 12:10 post. My strong preference would be to keep them both (Harbaugh and Baalke) as they would both be hard to replace. The first priority for Jed should be trying to get those two to work as a team.

            But if push came to shove I would let Harbaugh go. It isn’t because I think one is more or less valuable than the other, it comes solely down to which guy I think is harder to find someone that would mesh well with them in the other role. I think finding a GM (that is any good) that would work well with Harbaugh would be hard to do).

            Speculative on my part, but where I sit.

            As to rocket’s point though, I too can find it hard to know where you sit on a topic. You got annoyed with me yesterday for putting words in your mouth and said I should know better. Apologies for that, but it isn’t always easy to know what you mean with your comments. You can sometimes leave a lot unsaid and open to interpretation.

          14. Jack,

            Your need to cover all ends of a topic has nothing to do with my level of intelligence. You make open ended arguments so you are not stuck in one corner of an opinion if called on something you write.

          15. I’m referring to your views on Harbaugh the HC Jack. You say he’s a very good but he can be replaced by David Shaw. He’s a very good Coach but not great because he hasn’t won a SB then say you will call him great if he wins a SB. You are covered if he goes and also if he stays because you never said he wasn’t good…just that you feel he can be replaced by somebody who hasn’t done it in the NFL.

            Anyone with common sense can see Harbaugh is a great HC because he’s won everywhere he’s been. That doesn’t mean he’s the best ever or even the best in the NFL, but HC’s with his winning percentage are not just pretty good or very good. They are elite Coaches who win and they are few and far between in this league.

          16. rocket,

            I’d be an idiot to say that Harbaugh is not very good.

            For me greatness comes with championships. If you disagree so be it.

            Shaw has shown that he can replace Harbaugh. The point about Shaw not having previous NFL experience is moot. Harbaugh had none when he took over the 49ers and Shaw had no head coaching experience whatsoever when he took over at Stanford yet has 2 trips to the Rose Bowl on his résumé.

          17. @Hammer

            The greatness comes not when things go always good for you. But the greatness comes when you’re really tested, when you take some knocks, some disappointments, when sadness comes. Because only if you’ve been in the deepest valley can you ever know how magnificent it is to be on the highest mountain.

          18. Hammer says “Shaw has shown that he can replace Harbaugh”. All he showed against Michigan State was pure arrogance by letting his pride get in the way of victory. On a critical 4th down he lined up in his power run formation and proceeded to hand the football to the guy everyone in the stadium knew was getting it. Then the back to back Rose Bowl Coach Shaw said “It looked initially like we were going to get the push, and then we got stopped up front.” Funny how that works when you’re facing nine men at the line of scrimmage that knows the exact play that’s coming, and oh by the way, the best run defense in the country. This is your idea of good coaching? I don’t think so, and I suppose a lot of NFL executives took notice and agreed with Coach Shaw when he decided he wasn’t ready for that step up in competition at the NFL level…..

        1. I haven’t seen that issue addressed much, but it seems pretty obvious. Would Roman stay to work with Tomsula or Fangio? Only maybe. Would Fangio work for Tomsula and not go with Harbaugh? Scolari? Rathman and Tomsula have some SF connection, but the other guys are pretty much Jimbo’s Tree.
          Besides, the notion that this would happen in March seems unlikely and I’ll advised.

      1. Style is the key in winemaking, not recipe. Young people graduating from Davis, Fresno State, CalPoly SLO all have the technical recipe for making wine; a select few are virtuosos right out of college. Sometimes the House has a defined style, sometimes the winemaker is the owner and expresses their personal style.
        eg: Merry Edwards, Marimar Torres and Melissa Stackhouse all make Pinot Noir from similar, and in a few cases the same vineyards in the Russian River Valley. All three of these wines are consistently excellent year after year, but they don’t taste the same; they’re unique. Winemaking is science and craft and art.
        Being a Head Coach at NFL level is a complicated bundle of responsibilities centered around organization and communication. There isn’t one way to do it well. NFL HCs are not modular units that can be plugged in like changing a Mother Board.

  10. I highly doubt any type of deal could be done with the Dolphins because they would probably want us to take on Jonathan Martin and his current contract, which would easily be a deal killer.

      1. Because it would get rid of a contract that team doesn’t want and they could also claim that Martin is the equivalent of a high draft pick.

    1. Does this link mean you agree that Harbaugh is “outstanding”, which is to say, closer to “great” than it is to “very good”?

      Are you capitulating? Why provide this link?

      Do you think Jed went to Miami to negotiate now for a trade to take place in 11 months? That would be nonsensical, would it not?

  11. From a Matt Barrows post on the Sac Bee’s 49er blog:

    Jed York is going to attend NFL committee meetings early next week in Miami.

  12. Jim Tomsula?….interesting.
    So, if I understand this correctly, the current position taken by those who advocate keeping Baalke over Harbaugh, should the 49ers ever get to that point, goes like this:

    The 49ers have arguably one of the most talented rosters in the league. Yet, with this roster JH has not won a SB in three attempts. What guarantee is there then that JH will ever win a SB with the Niners? He may or may not.
    JH is a very good coach but perhaps just not good enough yet, and thus replaceable.

    Then, Jim Tomsula is the man who will seamlessly replace Jim Harbaugh.
    Additional picks +Tomsula = as good a chance of a SB with Harbaugh.

    Is this a summary of the position?

    1. Maybe even a better chance to win the Super Bowl. The 49ers would gain great picks and lose a head coach who freezes up at the end of championship games.

      1. You ask what I meant by you demeaning professionals. This is a good example.

        The 49ers would gain great picks and lose a head coach who freezes up at the end of championship games.”

  13. OK, thanks, now that I understand the position.

    Then, it would seem the 49ers wasted three seasons with Harbaugh when they could made Jim Tomsula the HC in the first place, three years ago.

        1. He should be upset with himself and his agent for not insisting on escalators in the initial contract. Escalators are standard…

  14. Grant,

    Thanks, but I disagree, the issue is not about money/raise.
    Let me quote the point you made just a bit earlier: “Maybe even a better chance to win the Super Bowl. The 49ers would gain great picks and lose a head coach who freezes up at the end of championship games.”…..the issue is then about coaching talent/ability/acumen.

    Tomsula is and has been very respected by the 49ers and fans. Three years ago the 49ers could have gone with Tomsula as HC but deemed him not the right guy. Now, he is the right guy…why?

    1. The roster is loaded and he has experience and familiarity with the system and the players. The players love Tomsula and would play hard for him. Fangio still would run the defense and Roman still would run the offense.

      1. You’re completely bonkers if you think Harbaugh would accept any trade that didn’t permit him to take his coaching staff with him.

  15. Grants blogging stimulates these heated rants. Regardless of the emotional content in these conversations. I agree that there are weaknesses in harboughs coaching and in their offensive philosophy, time management and play calling. Also if we are nitpicking his challenge flags are horrendous. You can say that most of this is Romans problem but in reality it is harboughs. It falls back on him. But what makes him very good instead if just good is how he has brought everyone together, the three amazing regular season records, and how far they have gone in playoffs. His weaknesses are magnified because of the losses in the big games. I agree with grant that his tendencies will win many games but may be hindrance to winning the big one.

    1. I think we could’ve won the last two Super Bowls hands down if the coaching had been better.

      They made up for Alex smiths weaknesses with their coaching but are not able to with kaepernick.

  16. Id say if we keep him he should make less than Carroll with an escalator to have him earn more than Carroll if he wins super bowl. I would bump his base salary to 6 to 6.5 million.

  17. I hope somebody in the NFL gets arrested for streaking in The Mall of America, or something so we can move on from these silly speculations. Is this the FF mind Jonesing in the off-season?
    Grant: the whole front office is going to Miami to trade Harbaugh to the Dolphins.
    Jed: uh, no.
    Grant: John’s cutting Jed out of the deal
    Jed: uh, no
    Grant: we’ll Jed’s going to do it.
    Jed: uh-uh
    Grant: we’ll, he should do it.
    John Madden: Uh, No!
    Grant: Tomsula’s the guy.
    Jed: Love and admire him enough to give him the Interim HC job and guarantee him a spot on the new staff with the new HC, but if I wanted him as The Man I would’ve left him in place and not hired Harbaugh. But he’s been a great Defensive CoOrdinator, oh, wait….
    Grant: It doesn’t matter, he can still promote from within. Perhaps Paraag? Or maybe one of the really savvy Goldrush Girls.
    PS @ Crabs15-
    I think this series by Grant should be candidates for your Tuesday Quote Follies sometime in the future. Get back to that, Bro.

  18. @Razor
    I think the PC way to express that is: “Out(!)Standing”. : >)
    Regarding Harbaugh’s prickly personality, I think back to COs I worked under. Stateside I hated spit and polish, anal retentive p*****, but in CZ a mean or d***ish CO who was competent under fire was A-OK. You see an FNG show up, you worried the rookie might get somebody killed. With a new Bn or Co CO, or especially a rookie PC, you knew they could get you ALL killed. Even in business, I was busy, I’d always rather do business with a nasty guy or gal who was competent than a very nice nincompoop who wasted my time.
    Harbaugh wins. All the what-ifs about mythical other coaches who would’ve won it all with SFs roster can be endlessly remodeled to fit an arguement. What if (2 BIG ifs in this one) Harbaugh gets hired by Dallas in 2010, and ( here’s the BIG one) Jerry Jones lets him coach, then THAT is the floundering 8-8 team that heads deep into the Playoffs the next 3 years.

  19. My bad… I forgot why I stopped reading this blog. Today I accidentally found my way back out of boredom and there was a lack of new stories from Matt & Matt. The beating of a dead horse was bad enough but then to see the author of the article defend his stance in ways that prove he is simply a pot stirrer, solidified my reasoning behind not coming on here.

    Without getting into name calling or negative and immature comments, I have one question for the author.

    If we have such a deep team, with few holes, cap space, a solid coaching staff, a new stadium, a fan base that loves the head coach and a BUTT LOAD of picks already, why would trading for more picks be a good thing for us to get rid of Harbaugh? It seems to me that trading a HC with proven results and momentum as a franchise for a bunch of picks, half of which don’t make the team would be a bad idea or it is simply the author’s way of stirring the aforementioned pot.

    When the blog posts are just the news conferences and interviews, typed verbatim, with no editorial or comments, the author is at his best.

      1. Your logic has major holes in it Grant. NFL history is littered with HOF coaches that didn’t “seal the deal” in their first couple oppurtunities.

      2. And Harbaugh’s team didn’t have major holes when they didn’t have a WR beyond Crabtree worth a damn for the first two years?

        Both John Harbaugh and Tom Coughlin sealed the deal because their teams got hot at the right time; not because they are great Coaches. Neither one of them had the start to their HCing career that Jim Harbaugh has had, in fact nobody has.

        1. He had two of the best tight ends in football.

          Coughlin and John Harbaugh didn’t freeze up at the end of their Super Bowls. They didn’t lose the game for their teams.

          1. Grant, I’ve forgotten more about football since breakfast than you have ever known, and that aint much…

            You keep pounding the Tomsula drum like you don’t actually see the debacle that would ensue if he took over coming. Tomsula is so great that he has had how many suitors clamoring at the Santa Clara gates this offseason? You have got to be kidding me right?

            Alright, that’s not fair. You don’t know football as well as my grade school son, so of course you don’t see what’s coming in that hypothetical future. Well, lets look into the past for some referential material that might help everyone that reads your blog better judge the opinions that you have been espousing here of late about Jim Harbaugh’s performance as a head coach, just to put your arguments into some perspective. Let’s see if you’re possessed with the neuronal activity to follow me on this one.

            All this racket about Harbaugh not being a great coach because he can’t win the big one in his first three tries? Do you have any idea how many hall of fame coaches you’re insinuating are chokers based on the assumptions you’ve made about what those championship losses imply? Did you know Tom Landry lost 2 championship games to the Packers, 1 Superbowl to the Colts, and 2 divisional playoff games to the Browns before he ever won a Superbowl? Of course you didn’t Grant. You don’t know anything about football. I guess Tom Landry should have been shown the door then huh Grant? He was a choker right? He froze up in championship games right Grant? You know, in your undeniably informed opinion? By your definition he was even less successful as a coach than Harbaugh, clearly. But oh wait… People who know football consider Landry one of the greatest coaches in the history of the game and he was incredibly well respected before he ever won the Superbowl. How do you explain that Grant? Please expand in your answer. I’d love to see you try to convince everyone that Tom Landry was overrated and should have been traded for a first round draft pick. That is essentially what you are saying, as Harbaugh’s record in his first three years is miles better than Landry’s.

            Then there’s John Madden. So overrated it’s unbelievable. I can’t believe the Raiders hung on to him after he led his team to playoffs in 6 of his first 7 years as HC, BUT DIDN’T WIN THE BIG GAME. What a bum! Of course he is an even worse coach than Jim Harbaugh since he lost the AFL Championship in his first year, The AFC Championship in his second year, and missed the playoffs in his 3rd year with one of the most talented rosters in the history of the game. He didn’t have the stones right Grant? Please expand on how much of a choker, Championship freeze-up artist John Madden was. That’ll do wonders for your credibility. Given Madden’s even greater failures than Harbaugh’s, what would you have traded for John Madden Grant? A second round pick? Do tell.

            Don Shula really sucked. He lost 5 playoff games including 1 NFL championship game and 2 Superbowls before he broke through. Too bad Jim Tomsula wasn’t around to rescue Shula’s squads from him. History might have been so much kinder to his teams.

            The list goes on Grant. There are endless examples of Hall of Fame Coaches that didn’t break through in their first few tries, hell Lombardi lost his first championship game. Did you know that Grant? Be honest now. Of course you didn’t. Quick, rush to your favorite stat site right now to verify. That can’t be right, can it? The damn trophy is named after him. He must have won ‘em all right Grant?

            Need more modern examples? As often noted by your readers, Cowher stunk in the clutch I guess, Sean Payton didn’t even get his team to the playoffs in two of his first three seasons with one of the best QBs in football, Tony Dungy, Jon Gruden, and on and on and on. So many first rate chokers whom, just as you described Jim Harbaugh doing, “freeze up in championship games”.

            Here’s the thing Grant, games turn on numerous plays, none of which the HC gets to strap it on for. Great coaches create a championship atmosphere and give players the structure that allows them to succeed, then the players either make the plays or they don’t, simple as that. All you can ask of a coach is that he keep putting his players in the position to succeed year after year, that he keep them believing in the system, and in the process, and in each other, and scratching and clawing for the team, the team, the team, practice after practice, day after day, week after week, year after year, and yes, heartbreak after heartbreak. That is the real job of a head football coach you see: to take a very large group of very large men, whom are highly competitive, highly egotistical, disparately intentioned, rolling in the benjamins, distractions all around them, and running so hot 9 months out of the year that it’s a minor miracle they don’t commit more felonies on the whole than they already do, and keep them all pointed in the same direction, all invested in each other and the team, all focused on getting better every day, and all focused on winning the next game, even as they risk their bodies and careers with every snap of the ball. You don’t know anything about football so of course you couldn’t possibly fathom how difficult that is to do, and what a special person such a job requires to do it.

            Jim Harbaugh has done all of that and more. He took a team that had no confidence, that got booed off the field repeatedly, that had a failed QB, that had no tradition of winning, no understanding of how to win consistently, or how play together, or how to play for each other, and elevated them to one of the most tight nit, confident, hard working, and focused teams I have ever had the privilege to watch up close and that is no easy thing to do. He deserves ALL OF THE CREDIT for that, Trent Baalke be damned.

            It was championship culture that Tom Landry brought to the Cowboys, John Madden to the Raiders, and Shula to the Colts and Dolphins. It is championship culture that wins consistently, not just talent. It is championship culture that Jim Harbaugh brought with him to Santa Clara, not just x’s and o’s, and certainly not players. Championship culture was worth 8 more wins in 2011 than all 53 players, plus practice squad and PUPs, that Trent Baalke could muster the year before, with virtually the same team. Championship culture was worth 41 wins in the last 3 seasons (playoffs included) – that is more than the number of wins the team totaled in the 7 years previous to Harbaugh’s arrival! That speaks for itself.

            One last historical footnote of relevance: Unlike Tom Landry’s and John Madden’s management, whom recognized their coach’s value despite their early heartbreaks, Don Shula’s owner was not very happy with him for not being able to “win the big one” while with the Colts, his importance was underestimated, and amid well documented friction with management, he walked. He took his championship culture with him to Miami. The Dolphins became a powerhouse and eventually the only undefeated team in the history of the sport, always competitive during his 25 years there, winning 10 or more games in 16 of those seasons, while the Colts, even though they had received a first round pick for Don Shula as a result of a controversial tampering infraction enforced upon the Dolphins, were only able to cling on to the residue of the Shula’s championship culture for a couple years before fading into obscurity for the NEXT 30 SEASONS. That history should give every 49ers fan pause, and I sincerely hope that Jed York knows his football history lest he repeat the famed mistake of Colts owner, Carroll Rosenbloom.

            Feel free to respond and please do so at length. I’d love for you to try and make sense out of your own argument given the implication of what your assertions about Harbaugh’s coaching in big games implies about every coach in history that wasn’t lucky enough to win on their first try. Tom Landry’s, John Madden’s, and Don Shula’s Hall of Fame careers make your argument hard to justify, because anyone in their right mind wouldn’t say those men froze in the big moment, and as I said, Jim Harbaugh’s career is off to a better start than any of theirs. React please, I dare you to make even more of a fool of yourself than you already have on this topic.

          2. Delanie Walker was not one of the best TE’s in football. There is no limit to your reaching apparently.

            What exactly is it that John Harbaugh did in the second half to win the SB Grant? I know he watched his return team get him a TD that had nothing to do with how he managed the game. I know he watched his defense get torched and put his team in position to give up the biggest lead in SB history and lose. What exactly did he do to exhibit not freezing up in your mind?

            Tom Coughlin watched his QB escape a sack and complete a miracle to a WR who secured the catch to his head. He also had a good seat to watch Wes Welker drop a pass that may have changed the outcome and his QB complete another low percentage throw down the sideline that would fail more often than not. I don’t see great Coaching as the factor in winning these SB’s, and there certainly wasn’t great Coaching as the Giants went 9-7 during the season.

            The truth is none of these guys froze up and neither did Jim H. Coaches give their players a game plan and the players play. The players ultimately decide the outcome based on their ability to perform at key moments. Kap and Crabtree failed twice in key moments and that’s the difference in winning a SB and getting there a second time. That happens with a young inexperienced QB which John and Coughlin also didn’t have to deal with.

            1. Walker led the league in long catches by a TE and was a good blocker.

              Those coaches didn’t lose the game for their teams like Jim did.

          3. Walker caught 19 passes the entire season. He was not a big factor in the passing game and not even remotely close to being one of the best TE’s in the game. Take a break you need it.

            1. You need the break. Walker is one of the highest paid tight ends in the league. He was a serious threat in 2012. Unfair to have a No.2 TE who is that good.

          4. And this is the part where Tomsula comes riding in on his appaloosa to show Jim how it’s done? Bwaaaaaaaaaah!

          5. Walker is middle of the pack in money and his contract is dwarfed by many . 19 catches and a problem with dropping the ball is not a major threat. He was useful in the offense because he was versatile, not because he was some big threat. You should really take that break.

          6. “Freeze up at the end of their Super Bowls” is the equivalent of charging that Harbough choked and it is demeaning (your word was “fun”) to a professional in a field where you have no underlying foundation of knowledge.

            Constantly repeating it in no way advances your point.

          7. The first one was due to Crabtree struggling against a mediocre secondary, mainly due to the fact that the team didn’t have somebody in the passing game to keep the Giants honest. The second and third championship losses were more due to Kaep predetermining who he was going to throw to and committing to it despite what the opposing defense was giving him in each game.

          1. OH…OH… Fight for the Honour
            Fight for the Splendour
            Fight for the Pleasure
            OH…OH… Fight for the Honour
            Fight for the Splendour
            Fight for your Life!

          2. he fighting resumes, a silence looms the
            Swordsman move ‘gainst each other
            A cut and a thrust, a parry, a blow
            a stab to the heart and you’re down
            The Angel of Death hears your last breath
            Meanwhile the reaper looks on

            OH…OH… Fought for the Honour
            Fought for the Splendour
            Fought for the Pleasure
            OH…OH… Fought for the Honour
            Fought for the Splendour
            Fought to the Death

  20. Here you go Hammer and Grant, in case you don’t know how to scroll. Please respond and prepare to be dominated yet again:

    Grant, I’ve forgotten more about football since breakfast than you have ever known, and that aint much…

    You keep pounding the Tomsula drum like you don’t actually see the debacle that would ensue if he took over coming. Tomsula is so great that he has had how many suitors clamoring at the Santa Clara gates this offseason? You have got to be kidding me right?

    Alright, that’s not fair. You don’t know football as well as my grade school son, so of course you don’t see what’s coming in that hypothetical future. Well, lets look into the past for some referential material that might help everyone that reads your blog better judge the opinions that you have been espousing here of late about Jim Harbaugh’s performance as a head coach, just to put your arguments into some perspective. Let’s see if you’re possessed with the neuronal activity to follow me on this one.

    All this racket about Harbaugh not being a great coach because he can’t win the big one in his first three tries? Do you have any idea how many hall of fame coaches you’re insinuating are chokers based on the assumptions you’ve made about what those championship losses imply? Did you know Tom Landry lost 2 championship games to the Packers, 1 Superbowl to the Colts, and 2 divisional playoff games to the Browns before he ever won a Superbowl? Of course you didn’t Grant. You don’t know anything about football. I guess Tom Landry should have been shown the door then huh Grant? He was a choker right? He froze up in championship games right Grant? You know, in your undeniably informed opinion? By your definition he was even less successful as a coach than Harbaugh, clearly. But oh wait… People who know football consider Landry one of the greatest coaches in the history of the game and he was incredibly well respected before he ever won the Superbowl. How do you explain that Grant? Please expand in your answer. I’d love to see you try to convince everyone that Tom Landry was overrated and should have been traded for a first round draft pick. That is essentially what you are saying, as Harbaugh’s record in his first three years is miles better than Landry’s.

    Then there’s John Madden. So overrated it’s unbelievable. I can’t believe the Raiders hung on to him after he led his team to playoffs in 6 of his first 7 years as HC, BUT DIDN’T WIN THE BIG GAME. What a bum! Of course he is an even worse coach than Jim Harbaugh since he lost the AFL Championship in his first year, The AFC Championship in his second year, and missed the playoffs in his 3rd year with one of the most talented rosters in the history of the game. He didn’t have the stones right Grant? Please expand on how much of a choker, Championship freeze-up artist John Madden was. That’ll do wonders for your credibility. Given Madden’s even greater failures than Harbaugh’s, what would you have traded for John Madden Grant? A second round pick? Do tell.

    Don Shula really sucked. He lost 5 playoff games including 1 NFL championship game and 2 Superbowls before he broke through. Too bad Jim Tomsula wasn’t around to rescue Shula’s squads from him. History might have been so much kinder to his teams.

    The list goes on Grant. There are endless examples of Hall of Fame Coaches that didn’t break through in their first few tries, hell Lombardi lost his first championship game. Did you know that Grant? Be honest now. Of course you didn’t. Quick, rush to your favorite stat site right now to verify. That can’t be right, can it? The damn trophy is named after him. He must have won ‘em all right Grant?

    Need more modern examples? As often noted by your readers, Cowher stunk in the clutch I guess, Sean Payton didn’t even get his team to the playoffs in two of his first three seasons with one of the best QBs in football, Tony Dungy, Jon Gruden, and on and on and on. So many first rate chokers whom, just as you described Jim Harbaugh doing, “freeze up in championship games”.

    Here’s the thing Grant, games turn on numerous plays, none of which the HC gets to strap it on for. Great coaches create a championship atmosphere and give players the structure that allows them to succeed, then the players either make the plays or they don’t, simple as that. All you can ask of a coach is that he keep putting his players in the position to succeed year after year, that he keep them believing in the system, and in the process, and in each other, and scratching and clawing for the team, the team, the team, practice after practice, day after day, week after week, year after year, and yes, heartbreak after heartbreak. That is the real job of a head football coach you see: to take a very large group of very large men, whom are highly competitive, highly egotistical, disparately intentioned, rolling in the benjamins, distractions all around them, and running so hot 9 months out of the year that it’s a minor miracle they don’t commit more felonies on the whole than they already do, and keep them all pointed in the same direction, all invested in each other and the team, all focused on getting better every day, and all focused on winning the next game, even as they risk their bodies and careers with every snap of the ball. You don’t know anything about football so of course you couldn’t possibly fathom how difficult that is to do, and what a special person such a job requires to do it.

    Jim Harbaugh has done all of that and more. He took a team that had no confidence, that got booed off the field repeatedly, that had a failed QB, that had no tradition of winning, no understanding of how to win consistently, or how play together, or how to play for each other, and elevated them to one of the most tight nit, confident, hard working, and focused teams I have ever had the privilege to watch up close and that is no easy thing to do. He deserves ALL OF THE CREDIT for that, Trent Baalke be damned.

    It was championship culture that Tom Landry brought to the Cowboys, John Madden to the Raiders, and Shula to the Colts and Dolphins. It is championship culture that wins consistently, not just talent. It is championship culture that Jim Harbaugh brought with him to Santa Clara, not just x’s and o’s, and certainly not players. Championship culture was worth 8 more wins in 2011 than all 53 players, plus practice squad and PUPs, that Trent Baalke could muster the year before, with virtually the same team. Championship culture was worth 41 wins in the last 3 seasons (playoffs included) – that is more than the number of wins the team totaled in the 7 years previous to Harbaugh’s arrival! That speaks for itself.

    One last historical footnote of relevance: Unlike Tom Landry’s and John Madden’s management, whom recognized their coach’s value despite their early heartbreaks, Don Shula’s owner was not very happy with him for not being able to “win the big one” while with the Colts, his importance was underestimated, and amid well documented friction with management, he walked. He took his championship culture with him to Miami. The Dolphins became a powerhouse and eventually the only undefeated team in the history of the sport, always competitive during his 25 years there, winning 10 or more games in 16 of those seasons, while the Colts, even though they had received a first round pick for Don Shula as a result of a controversial tampering infraction enforced upon the Dolphins, were only able to cling on to the residue of the Shula’s championship culture for a couple years before fading into obscurity for the NEXT 30 SEASONS. That history should give every 49ers fan pause, and I sincerely hope that Jed York knows his football history lest he repeat the famed mistake of Colts owner, Carroll Rosenbloom.

    Feel free to respond and please do so at length. I’d love for you to try and make sense out of your own argument given the implication of what your assertions about Harbaugh’s coaching in big games implies about every coach in history that wasn’t lucky enough to win on their first try. Tom Landry’s, John Madden’s, and Don Shula’s Hall of Fame careers make your argument hard to justify, because anyone in their right mind wouldn’t say those men froze in the big moment, and as I said, Jim Harbaugh’s career is off to a better start than any of theirs. React please, I dare you to make even more of a fool of yourself than you already have on this topic.

    1. Deek,

      That’s your gauntlet?

      Thank you for putting that together. Each of those coaches you listed have one thing in common. A championship. Just like I said last night in far fewer words and in a much less condescending tone.

      I’m about to have lunch now.

      1. That’s all you got Hammer? Another genius… Hammer, lets see if you can do the math. It took Landry 12 seasons to win the Superbowl. It took Madden 8. It took Shula 10. Harbaugh has had 3. And they were far more successful than the first three seasons any of those Hall of Fame coaches enjoyed. What each of those HOFers had in common, Hammer, was time. Rome was not built in a day. Neither was “America’s Team”. Why you are so enthusiastic about sending an excellent young coach down the road, when he resurrected the team you apparently root for from football hell and has them on the doorstep of a championship, is baffling.

        There are so many great lines from Shawshank Redemption, but here is one that applies to you and your deathgrip on an obviously flawed argument against Harbaugh: “I don’t understand. Why are you being so obtuse? Is it intentional?”

        I suspect it is… Either that or you are neuronally challanged.

        1. There are 22 coaches that have been deemed great enough for enshrinement in the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Only 4 of those men did not win a championship.

          Marv Levy – 4 straight trips to the Super Bowl
          Bud Grant – 3 trips to the Super Bowl
          Sid Gillman – the man many point to as the leading innovator of the passing game.
          George Allen – 10th winningest coach in the game at the time of his retirement.

          Jim Harbaugh can’t even hold their clipboard yet when discussing great.

          1. Jack, is that because he hasn’t had the time yet or because you don’t think he is good enough to achieve what they did over their careers?

          2. Scooter,

            He’s 3 years in, it’s way too soon to call him great. He hasn’t won anything to deserve being called that yet. Will he in time? Who knows for sure.

          3. If the term great bothers you that much Jack then we can change it to one of the top Football Coaches in the game today. Either term covers the fact he’s near the top of his profession and deserves the raise he is asking for.

          4. This is a great point, a great way to look at it. If Harbaugh’s coaching career ended today, would he be a Hall of Famer? Of course not.

            I think Tom Flores deserves to be in the Hall, even over Marv Levy. Winning two Super Bowls is a serious accomplishment.

            Flores > Madden.

          5. Jack, thank you for clarifying it is simply a time related point you are making. Too soon to be calling him great. That is fair.

            So, my next question is, do you believe he has what it takes to win the SB at some point? “Will he in time? Who knows for sure” – I get that your answer is you don’t know. Also very much fair enough. Impossible to know at this point. But what is your gut telling you? If your gut says yes, then you believe he has the capacity to be one of the greats (as measured by Super Bowl wins). Is it then wise to move on from Harbaugh if he doesn’t win it all next season? Is failure in season 4 going to tell you either way whether he can do it?

            You have stated that in a confrontation between Baalke and Harbaugh, you would choose Baalke. So would I, in order to create a united front office. What is your reasoning for this? I read your posts on 49erswebzone and understand your reasoning to be that Baalke’s ability to evaluate and bring in talent would be harder to replace than Harbaugh. Is this a correct summation?

            You go on to state that there are several potential coaching replacements already in the building, and you have also noted David Shaw as a potential replacement. Is it your belief these guys are as good (or better) candidates than Harbaugh? If yes, why?

            I’m making an assumption here, but I don’t believe this is what you meant. My take was that you think there are other candidates capable of coaching this team successfully given the ability of Baalke to bring in talent. They may not be better coaches than Harbaugh, but if Harbaugh is going to cause friction and hasn’t yet shown he can take them to victory in the Super Bowl then they are better off moving on and going with a potentially lesser yet capable coach and keeping Baalke in place. Is that correct?

            Sorry for the thousand questions, but I’m trying to understand exactly where you sit on all this.

          6. Scooter,

            I like Harbaugh a lot because I see a lot of myself in what he does. Don’t get me wrong, my coaching ability was nowhere close to Harbaugh’s, but the belief in a power run game, swarming defense, approach to players is familiar. When I did my predictions before the season I said I would never bet against a Harbaugh and I still feel that way.

            Yeah, I think Baalke has done a remarkable job of building a team that is not only strong with the frontline guys but throughout the roster. That depth has played a big role in the team being able to win like it has the last few years.

            I recently started covering the Buccaneers for cover32.com, and this has given me a far greater appreciation for Baalke’s work. The Bucs have decent front line talent, but absolutely no depth. Remember how bad Patrick Omameh looked for the 49ers last preseason? They have him as a backup on their active roster. No wonder they’ve stunk so long. But I digress.

            I definitely think that Shaw can be as good, maybe even better, than Harbaugh. Shaw has almost the same background as Harbaugh, football family, experience on NFL staffs, and now as the head coach of a top college program. He has taken what Harbaugh built and not only maintained it, but improved it.

            Shaw’s offensive coordinator from 2 years ago just helped the Colts improve from the prior season, and even with that loss on his staff they maintained success by going to the Rose Bowl for the 2nd straight season for the first time since 71-72.

            He’s more than capable in my opinion.

            Harbaugh is good, but if you choose him over Baalke what is going to make him all of a sudden stop grinding people and butting heads with the new guy? Eventually the 49ers will be right back in this same position, and I’d rather not weaken my front office.

            I hope that answers your questions. Good stuff.

          7. Thanks Jack, really appreciate you taking the time to answer my questions. That definitely clears up things for me and I actually think you and I are very much on the same page on this.

          8. “Jim Harbaugh can’t even hold their clipboard yet when discussing great.”

            After three years why make a statement like that? It wouldn’t even come up if some people weren’t incensed at that idea that Harbaugh has choked away three Super Bowl wins in the past three years. You haven’t called him a choker, but that demeaning evaluation is the trigger for a lot of the emotional out burst. Oh yes, then there title of this post that suggests that the 19th pick in the draft is worth more than the guy who choked away three Super Bowl wins.

            Harbaugh can certainly hold the clipboard of every 49er coach since 1946 except Walsh.

          9. Even Walsh “choked” away more Super Bowls than he won. In fact he managed to “choke” away three in a row when he had Montana, Rice, and Craig. The three of them managed zero touchdowns in those playoff games.

            I know it proves nothing but the fact I’m irritated by anyone who labels athletes or coaches as failures because “They couldn’t win the big one.”

          10. “After three years why make a statement like that?”

            Follow the thread. It had to do with whether Harbaugh is great or not. To this point he hasn’t reached that level.

            “Harbaugh can certainly hold the clipboard of every 49er coach since 1946 except Walsh.”

            Who said he couldn’t? Again, that was a statement regarding greatness and how only four coaches who have been enshrined in the Hall had failed to win a championship and that he couldn’t hold the clipboard of those four men.

            By the way, how many 49ers head coaches besides Walsh are in the Hall of Fame?

        2. @Hammer says “He’s 3 years in, it’s way too soon to call him great. He hasn’t won anything to deserve being called that yet”. That is absurd. He is the first coach in NFL history to appear in three straight championship games in his first three years. Never been done before. That means it’s unprecedented. Which means great. He’s a winner, and I like winners!

          1. Ding! Ding! Correct Mr. Hammer, but to say he hasn’t won anything to deserve being called great with the 0 Championships written on his 49er tombstone is not only premature, it is absurd.

      2. It was over the top emotionally, but the points are valid, and neither you or Grant deal with them. The first three years do not a career make. Harbaugh may be someone that no one can live with, but that doesn’t mean he’s had anything less than an outstanding first three years.

        What happens next will depend on how smart Jed is. His uncle wasn’t that easy for a coach to live with. Who knows about Jed?

        1. @htwaits.
          Eddie was no stranger to playing favorites. IIRC, after the 1983 season, he invited Joe and Dwight over to Youngstown, apparently wined and dined them, and then on a whim bumped up their contracts. Needless to say that did not sit well with Ronnie Lott, who was also looking for a new contract/extension.

          Fast forward to now, after three winning seasons:
          Jed has a brand new stadium
          Paraag has a new title
          Baalke has a contract extension till 2016
          Jimbo?

          Success often changes people, changes dynamics in between them.I would not be the least bit surprised if Jed now thinks: Meh, we found one successful coach, am sure we can find another.

          1. Maybe. I hope not. One of Walsh’s greatest achievements was dealing with his owner. Based on his press, Jed doesn’t seem to as tumultuous as his uncle. So far I’m not sure Harbaugh could deal with an owner like Eddie for as long as Walsh did. Of course Walsh was a basket case after ten years of Eddie.

            Eddie seems to be a person of amazing contradictions. Eddie had a close relationship with Freddie Solomon as Freddie was dieing of cancer. He was at his side during Freddie’s last days.

          2. “Baalke has a contract extension till 2016″

            Baalke doesn’t have an extension. That is the original contract he signed when he was hired in 2011. One year longer than Harbaugh.

          3. You may be right.
            On the other hand, according to Cam Inman:

            “Baalke has overseen the 49ers’ personnel since 2010, and he received a contract extension in February 2012 that runs through 2016.”

            From blogs.mercurynews.com/49ers
            Blog entry dated Dec 18, 2013.

          4. That is correct information. I’m not sure if he received a new contract when he moved to GM. I knew it ended in 2016 but should have double checked the start date.

        2. Jack, as you know there are no 49er coaches in the Hall except Walsh, but given that I’ve lived the ups and mostly downs of all of them, I’ll take Harbaugh if I’m restricted to living coaches. I would also take him for 2014 over anyone who is realistically available.

          I think that at least two of the Super Bowl winning coaches won their single championship based on having outstanding defense that they had little to do with developing. For that reason I wouldn’t include all Super Bowl winning coaches in a discussion of levels of greatness.

          If Jed can’t work out the Harbaugh contract situation, and does nothing until this time next year, it’s hard to imagine that Harbaugh will be back for a fifth year.

          1. “I wouldn’t include all Super Bowl winning coaches in a discussion of levels of greatness.”

            It gets them in the conversation, but I agree that not all of them are great.

            “If Jed can’t work out the Harbaugh contract situation, and does nothing until this time next year, it’s hard to imagine that Harbaugh will be back for a fifth year.”

            I agree.

      1. I hear you on the condescendence Scooter but this garbage is driving me up the wall. Grant has got the gall to essentially call Harbaugh, universally respected in his profession for his abilities (albeit not liked), a choker in so many words, saying over and over again that he “freezes up in big moments”? And what gives Grant the requisite experiential authority to be able to pass that kind of judgment on the early NFL career of a wildly successful coach who is loved and respected by his players, and who has brought success to a team that hadn’t experienced any in almost a decade? What has Grant done in his own profession? Is he universally respected as a journalist? Or as a writer? I think not. He is a troll, nothing more. And if you counter him with a lucid argument he doesn’t even respond. I’d say it is Grant who is out of line here.

    1. What response is possible? Your questions are excellent, but they have been brought up many times, and always ignored. It’s the equivalent of either taking the worst samples out of the data to make a negative point, or taking the best samples out of the data to make a positive point.

      One must assume that a degree in English from UCLA doesn’t include a five unit year long course in statistical analysis.

      1. htwait,

        Agreed. However, I have not seen anyone else bring up the point about Shula and the Colts. Isn’t it ironic that Grant is all hot and bothered by this Miami story, thinks the draft picks would be of greater value than Harbaugh, and doesn’t at least find it ironic that the Dolphins are the same team that Shula went to after the Colts managment, unappreciative of the value of a good coach, let him walk away? Has anyone else brought up the fact that the Colts owner Rossenbloom later said that was the biggest mistake of his career? Or that the Colts languished in obscurity for almost 30 years after that? No. These are new points that beg response. The similarities to this circumstance are eery.

  21. Still no response Grant? I explained how he didn’t freeze up. At length. I explained that THE TEAM got beat but that Harbaugh puts them in position to win. If you are essentially calling Harbaugh a choker, then how do you reconcile the early parts of the other 3 coaching careers I mentioned in some detail? Does Harbaugh not deserver the time to finish what he started, as those HOFers did, who each had early heartbreaks but year in and year out fostered a championship atmosphere as Harbaugh has done? You have not even attempted to address these obvious flaws in your understanding of the nature of coaching in the NFL, in your knowlege of the histories of those who have done it in the past with similar success and heartbreak that Harbaugh has experienced early in his NFL coaching career, and in the nature of team sports. Why don’t you respond with something that actually enlightens?

      1. Htwaits,

        Grant has made numerous responses since. He can’t argue the point because he knows his arguments don’t make sense. I’m sorry if my calling out a hack that has the audacity to label a excellent coach a choker bothers you. Is he not calling out Jim Harbaugh? And with what authority of knowlege of the history and tactics of the game is he making that statement? His total silence in the face of my calling him out to defend his argument in the face of logic steeped in the history of the game proves he has no basis for his argument, and no foundation of understanding with which defend it. As long as he keeps flogging a good coach, I’ll keep flogging him. He is a chump.

        1. The organization of this blog makes it hard to keep up with who replied to what and when.

          As I write this reply to you, someone else is probably making my look like a doddering old fool for liking what we have now, from a coaching point of view, over most of the history of the 49ers that I’ve lived through. I am also happy to keep the entire history of the 49ers over any other franchise. What could be dumber than that?

  22. Vernon Davis was open in the end zone on the last play of the Superbowl. Boldin was open on the last play of the NFCG. Was it Harbaugh’s fault that his young QB didn’t check down? With Harbaugh at coach, one thing you can be sure of is that he’ll continue to put his team in a position to win. At some point the players will make the plays that win championships. That is how it works. That is why it took Landry, Madden, and Shula a combined 30 seasons before they won their first championships. Is it your assertion that those three coaches are chokers too Grant? Fair question. Why can’t you answer it?

    1. Zadeek, in there you have another very good point that has been ignored for the most part in these discussions. At the end of the day it is the players that have to execute. You can be the best coach in the world but if your players don’t execute when it matters most you won’t win. Coaching can help get players in the right situation and right mind-set to execute in these moments, but sometimes the players will still make the wrong decisions. Was John Fox responsible for another Peyton Manning meltdown?

    2. It is safe to say that all three of these men would be looked at differently had they not won a championship, and to answer your question, of course they aren’t chokers, they finished the deal.

      When/If Harbaugh can get his team over the finish line the story will change.

      1. Jack,

        The point I made is that at the same point in their careers, and even long after, they had not yet closed the deal. You keep missing that. The fact is that great coaches continually put their teams in position to win. Players have to make plays the right time too, which is part of the reason that some great coaches have to wait a long time to get their titles. That doesn’t negate the value of their coaching though and Shula’s history, and the effect on the Baltimore franchise of his absence, proves the point with crystal clarity. When you have a good coach who gets his team to perform admirably consistantly, you keep him. Full stop. There are only a handful of coaches in any era that are worth more than a few wins per season. Jimbo is one. Labeling him a choker who can’t close the deal only highlights the ignorance of the labeler to the realities of the game. A head coach’s job is to create a winning system, a championship atmosphere, and championship expectations. The only reason the 49ers are even relavent is becasue Harbaugh has done that in spades. All I’m saying.

        1. Right, and the point that I am making is that unitl they finally closed the deal they weren’t held in the same regard as they are now post championships.

          1. Right but your stating that you’d be fine with a number of other guys taking the reigns right now is clear evidence that you are not giving Harbaugh his just due for the incredible perfomance of this team in the last 3 years. The same mistake that the Colts made with Shula, with disastrous effects. Do not underestimate the value of a winning coach.

      2. The only story that needs to be told while the journey is going on is what is the best alternative for a franchise from where they sit today, or tomorrow, or the next day. It’s pointless to condemn the present. Jack, that’s why I’m not interested in arguing greatness in relation to Harbaugh or any of his staff.

        My motor is running in this discussion for other reasons.

        Just in passing, I think that if the 49ers had failed to win the Super Bowl the year after they went one and out for the third consecutive year, none of Eddie’s top people could have kept him from firing Walsh and making it stick.

        1. Yeah I think DeBartolo probably tried to fire Walsh 5 or 6 times between that loss to Minnesota in ’87 and when they started ’88 6-5.

          1. At least that many times. They tell stories of waiting a day or so for Eddie to cool down. He seemed to recognize that he needed to be controlled in that way.

            If he had kept the team it would have been interesting to see how he adjusted to the cap hell that they went into.

  23. A lot of this stuff will unresolved amongst us because we have different criteria; as in personal takes on things. I judge by a different set of priorities and emphases than, let’s say Grant. OK, but then I come to this:
    “Flores > Madden”
    Look I understand and disagree with Grant’s valuation (only one guy on the podium, 1 medal ) but it’s poppycock; in football and in life. It’s a ridiculous point of view and if followed to its logical conclusion, only one person would blog about football, and I dare say Grant wouldn’t get that one job. To substantiate that I give you once again:
    “Flores > Madden” This is false.
    For any youngsters out there who know Madden only as a Grandfatherly tv announcer; go ask your Dad. Tom Flores is a good football guy whom I admire, but he isn’t of the same stature as Madden. Period. I doubt there’s another sports writer in the Bay Area who would buy Grant’s preposterous take. Maybe Jack will prove me wrong and climb on that bandwagon too? : >)

    1. Exacty Brotha. Not even a question. Madden was the guy that created the winning tradition. Which is much harder to do than to just carry it on. Was George Seifert a better coach in 1989 than Bill Walsh in 1988? The team won more games? How could that be? Seifert must have been better…. DOH! Some of the logic on this board, especially the host’s is so asinine.

    2. Flores would have won more than one SB if he had coached Madden’s stacked teams. Madden didn’t win a Super Bowl until he had one of the most talented teams ever.

      1. Grant, not sure if you follow any European football (aka soccer), but Real Madrid routinely trot out the most talented football squads year in, year out, and have had any number of top line trophy winning head coaches (or managers as they are termed in football). Yet the last time they won the Champions League – the ultimate in knock out competitions – was in 2001-02. They often fail to live up to their billing as the ‘Galacticos”.

        Having the most talented team and a top coach doesn’t mean you will win it all. As I said previously, all it takes is to come up against another good team that catches fire at the right time. That is the beauty of playoff systems that are win or you’re out.

      2. Maybe he would have.
        But, do you think Madden’s teams and Flores’ teams faced the same caliber of teams in the playoffs to reach the SB?

        Madden’s solo SB win came in the middle of the Steelers dominant run….was there such a dominant team in the AFC during Flores’ time? I do not believe so.

        1. “Madden’s solo SB win came in the middle of the Steelers dominant run….was there such a dominant team in the AFC during Flores’ time?”

          From 1980-1989 the AFC went 2-8 in the Super Bowl. The Raiders under Flores counted for the 2. Make of that what you will.

          1. I urge you to re-read what I wrote in my earlier post.
            My point was Madden’s coaching career also coincided with the Steelers dominant run, and just prior to that the Dolphins back-to-back SB wins….hence harder to get past them to the SB.

            In 1980 and 1983, when Flores won, which were the dominant teams, either in the AFC, or for that matter even in the NFC?

          2. The 49ers and Redskins dominated the NFL from 1981-1989. Flores’ Raiders team that won SB XVIII defeated the defending World Champion Redskins, who had defeated the 49ers to get there.

            I do get your point on the tough road Madden faced within the conference. It was very similar to what Walsh faced in the NFC with Gibbs and Parcells. Parcells in particular.

      3. Oh, we’re going to mix and match coaches and teams through history, are we? So ok, go through everyone playing in the league during those eras that represent the coaches opponents and develop a strength-of-opponents algorithm, and that will tell you what exactly? You make specious claims that are unsupportable.
        Apples ain’t oranges. Could Derelle Revis shut down Paul Warfield Mano-a-Mano?
        We’ll never know. Someone can throw out their opinion on that and it’s worthless, because it unknowable.
        Barry Switzer won a ring; is he on the same level as Madden or Seifert? Absolutely positively NOT, but by your FF criteria he would be. Sorry, when you sling stuff that is that far off of reality I have trouble letting it pass unmolested.

        1. … and Seifert followed Wash’s over all organizational plan to win his first Super Bowl in dominating fashion. Then, when they loaded up the year before the cap stated he was smart enough to throw out the Walsh business like approach and let his 1994 team just go out and play. It took a few games to get them rolling, and almost killed Steve Young in the process, but they ended up being dominant.

          I really don’t know if Seifert was a great coach, but I do know that he is my favorite 49er person of all time.

          1. There are franchise builders: Lombardi, Brown, Walsh, Jimmy Johnson….these turn around a floundering/expansion franchise and turn them into winners.

            Then there are franchise managers, who follow up on the franchise builders, and win titles: Seifert, Swittzer, Flores, Tomlin.

            But, on this blog, all that matters seemingly is a ring. So, as long as you win one you are a great coach….the scope of the challenge seemingly is unimportant.

    3. Well at least we know for sure who was best in a booth with a microphone in from of them.

      I think that they both must have done a good job, given their owner, but the fact remains that neither of them got the football credit they deserved when they were active coaches because “Mr. Davis” wouldn’t tolerate it. Madden had to live with a press that constantly demeaned his coaching as nothing but a front man for the real coaching genius, Davis.

      I agree with you that counting rings effects only one thing, public perception. As Steve Young has said, many many times, no matter how you play, the ring changes public perception. It doesn’t change reality, but it does change public perception.

          1. I’ve said numerous times that I don’t consider a coach great unless they have won a championship. You’re a smart guy, figure it out.

    1. Razor
      I wanted to wait for Jack to answer for himself. He’s pretty consistent with his thinking, so I can respect his opinion even though I heartily disagree on this question. I fundamentally disagree on the premise that one has to win the SB to get full credit. George Seifert has stated publicly that as he reviews his HC years at SF he thought a year other than his SB win was his best season coaching. Alas I don’t remember which season, but the team sputtered a bit, righted itself but didn’t go far in the playoffs; yet he thought that steering the team through adversity was his best effort and result as a Head Coach.
      But the eyeball test for me is beyond obvious: Don Coryell was an outstanding HC, offensive innovator, and program builder.

      1. I do not go by the premise that a coach only achieves greatness when he wins the championship.

        In a team sport there are many factors involved that can easily swing the pendulum one way or another.

        Great players can make a mediocre coach look great. Basketball’ Miami Heat is a perfect example. Can Erik Spoelstra win a championship without LeBron James?
        Heck, the same can be said of Pat Riley when he coached the Juggernaut Lakers
        teams.

        George Seifert won a SB but will he be considered a great coach?
        Seifert, similarly had great players in the same way Spoelstra has.

        Paul Brown won championships in the NFL and pre-NFL league (7 counting both leagues) but had a below 500% winning record in his years as Bengals coach – does that make him a less than great?

        Bill Walsh finished his second tour of duty as Stanford’ head with a 3-7-1 record. Yet, Bill Walsh will go down as a great coach known as the person who perfected the WCO in the big leagues.
        But I wonder how many SB wins BW wins without great players.

        I guess many people have their own interpretation of great. But in a team sport it takes more than just a coach/players to achieve greatness.

        1. I agree AES, which is why this is a topic that can’t be viewed with the Black and White mindset Grant and Jack are using to determine how good he is.

          1. rocket,
            I can see Grant and Hammer’ point here and yes, it bears consideration just as well.

            There is such a fine line and like you say no true black and white clear answer.
            Here’s a couple more examples that can fall into such a category.
            1. Minnesota’s coach Bud Grant and Buffalo Bills coach Mark Levy took their teams to SB appearances yet lost.
            My personal take is that these were great coaches because they were consistent winners, but I could certainly understand the line of thought that many don’t consider them great because they did not win the ultimate prize.

            As 49ers faithful the bar for greatness is achieving SB wins and I understand that standard.
            But no one can convince me that players like Frank Gore, Justin Smith, Patrick Willis and N.Bowman and coach Harbaugh are not great if they never win a SB.
            But that’s just one man’s opinion.

          2. AES,

            If pass interference had been called on that 4th down play and the Niners had then run it in for a TD to win the game, then by Grant and Jacks logic he could now be called a Great HC. If an officials flag is the difference in determining a HC’s level of ability, then the theory is severely flawed.

            Winning the SB can’t be the determining factor in rating a coaches worth. There are far too many variables beyond the coaches control to do that.

      2. Brother Tuna,
        Probably Seifert’s last season, 1996.
        The 49ers lost the division to the upstart Panthers, ended up a WC team. In the first round, against the Eagles, Young busted his ribs running it in for a TD.
        In the divisional round, they went up to Lambeau, Young insisted on playing, took most of the practice reps, and lasted one series or two.
        That season was also Walsh looking over Trestman’s shoulders….the one that finally culminated in Eddie bellowing “He’s gone”.

  24. Hopefully this statement puts the ridiculous argument of Harbaugh being great or not to bed. Whether we agree on his current legacy or not, we should all concur that Jim Harbaugh is one of the best coaches right now in the NFL.

    1. Who cares if the word great is applicable or not? The man wins. Period. And coaches whom, through the sheer force of their presence in the organization add significantly to your win total, don’t grow on trees. Pay the man. Keep the man.

          1. Very ironic that you point to an end of game failure as a reason for him not being ready to potentially replace Harbaugh….

          2. Interesting he turned down the chance to coach with the big boys, and the irony is all yours since you want him to replace Harbaugh. P.S. 21 runs 7 passes the entire second half. Not just the last 4 plays. After that game, NFL interest diminished…

          3. Perhaps you didn’t watch the 49ers fail in the 4th quarter their final game each of the last 3 years.

            He’s pushed away the NFL because he doesn’t want to uproot his young boys.

          4. Harbaugh is a franchise builder. You’ve been known to point out Kaepernicks’ progression deficiencies. If you want Kaepernick to reach his full potential in that regard, and I assume you do (maybe you’d like to do a package deal Harbaugh/Kaepernick, then bring in Shaw/Fales? I don’t know…), who could possibly do a better job than Jimmy Joe Harbaugh, also known as the quarterback whisperer?

            I knew you’d come up with an excuse for Shaw not wanting to make that jump to the NFL. What will you come up with next? Baalke has a private agreement with Shaw, guaranteeing him the job just as soon as he’s able to unload Harbaugh?

          5. “Harbaugh is a franchise builder.”

            Yes he is. And Shaw took his Stanford franchise to new heights.

            “You’ve been known to point out Kaepernicks’ progression deficiencies. If you want Kaepernick to reach his full potential in that regard, and I assume you do, who could possibly do a better job than Jimmy Joe Harbaugh, also known as the quarterback whisperer?”

            Harbaugh is very good with QB’s but so is Shaw. In fact those Rose Bowl trips didn’t come with Luck, Harbaugh’s guy, but rather Kevin Hogan. A guy he has developed. I’m sure He could help Kaepernick improve.

          6. Shaw. You mean the guy that flunked his Rose Bowl exam? The guy with the imagination of a fruit fly? HA! Asinine.

            All we have to do is look at the 49ers in 2010 under Singletary and then the 49ers in 2011. Harbaugh’s first season…the roster was much the same, and the results striking. That’s great value. Even if Harbaugh has difficulty getting along with management, Grant, and Hammer… that kind of greatness is irrefutable and extremely rare in this sport. You and Grant keep saying Harbaugh can’t win the big game and is a freezer. It’s just further evidence that he’s had the 49ers within a play or two each time, and it’s the reason you and your ilk could get draft picks for him. Harbaugh knows quarterbacks, and knows how to develop them. It’s this ability that is most valuable. There’s only a handful of coaches in this league with that ability. Could a suit or GM hold a locker room together, and ensure every player was walking on the Razors Edge with all the boats sailing in the same direction…. from training camp all the way through to the championship, three straight years? Is there anything to suggest in Harbaughs 4th year, his team will not be as competitive in 2014? One more thing, for all the reports on how bad it is to work with Harbaugh, it’s interesting the stellar staff he’s assembled, and held together…..

          7. Jack,

            Shaw did not take Stanford to new heights. Harbaugh left with one loss and an Orange bowl victory. Shaw lost two games the following season including the Fiesta Bowl. The past two seasons have both been two loss seasons with one Rose Bowl win and one loss.

            That is not raising the program to new heights. It’s not even maintaining the level Harbaugh left it at.

            I like David Shaw. I think he’s a very good coach in fact, but the 9ers have a proven winner as HC and assuming you can plug somebody else in and achieve the same results is unrealistic and has rarely happened in the past.

          8. “All we have to do is look at the 49ers in 2010 under Singletary and then the 49ers in 2011. Harbaugh’s first season…the roster was much the same, and the results striking.”

            Two things: First, there were 19 players on the 2011 roster that were not on the team in 2010. That’s a lot of change in one year.

            Second, Singletary was an awful coach whose staff was just as bad. He fired Raye and replaced him with Johnson, who a year later was fired by UCLA.

            “You and Grant keep saying Harbaugh can’t win the big game and is a freezer.”

            The losses speak for themselves.

            “It’s just further evidence that he’s had the 49ers within a play or two each time”

            You give Harbaugh a pass here, but rip Shaw. Ironic.

            “Could a suit or GM hold a locker room together, and ensure every player was walking on the Razors Edge with all the boats sailing in the same direction…. from training camp all the way through to the championship, three straight years?”

            Yes, if the suit can find a competent replacement.

            “Is there anything to suggest in Harbaughs 4th year, his team will not be as competitive in 2014?”

            I never said there was. In fact, I said this season has a very 1994 “win it or tear it down” feeling to it, and that’s a good thing.

            “One more thing, for all the reports on how bad it is to work with Harbaugh, it’s interesting the stellar staff he’s assembled, and held together…..”

            They know Harbaugh is a good coach and that will create opportunities. A big reason that the staff is still together is that they haven’t had a chance to leave because of the deep playoff runs. And don’t forget that a couple years ago the 49ers denied a team to interview Donatell for a D Coordinator position.

          9. rocket,

            Shaw has won back-to-back Pac10 championships. I may have forgotten so please remind me of how many Harbaugh won at Stanford.

          10. Jack,

            Winning a PAC 12 championship with two losses tells us it wasn’t as hard to win doesn’t it.

            The Wins and losses don’t back up your assertion.

          11. @Hammer

            Two things: First, there were 19 players on the 2011 roster that were not on the team in 2010. That’s a lot of change in one year.

            Little thing: How many of the 19 were starters?

            Second, Singletary was an awful coach whose staff was just as bad. He fired Raye and replaced him with Johnson, who a year later was fired by UCLA.

            Which speaks to the degree of difficulty Harbaugh was faced with, yet was able to change the culture of ineptitude in just one year, to championship quality.

            The losses speak for themselves.

            The victories speak louder. 36 wins 11 losses winning percentage .766

            You give Harbaugh a pass here, but rip Shaw. Ironic.

            You say Shaw is proven, and after his lack of creative innovation against the Spartans, I have to agree with you. If Shaw can’t adjust at halftime against Michigan States defense, how is he going to do against the Panthers. (I still get goosebumps thinking about the job the entire coaching staff did in that game)

            Yes, if the suit can find a competent replacement.

            IF being the operative word…

            I never said there was. In fact, I said this season has a very 1994 “win it or tear it down” feeling to it, and that’s a good thing.

            I see nothing good about tearing down a .766 winning percentage and being one of four teams to have a chance to win the Super Bowl every year…Nor do I see a reason to.

            They know Harbaugh is a good coach and that will create opportunities. A big reason that the staff is still together is that they haven’t had a chance to leave because of the deep playoff runs. And don’t forget that a couple years ago the 49ers denied a team to interview Donatell for a D Coordinator position.

            Too bad you don’t realize that Harbaugh created and continues to create opportunities for this staff to go into the history books as Super Bowl champions every year….

          12. “How many of the 19 were starters?”

            6, with non-starters such as Aldon Smith and Chris Culliver playing key roles.

          13. Jack,

            A PAC 12 Title means about as much as a most beautiful pig Title if you can win it with 2 losses and go on to lose to Michigan State. The bottom line is Shaw has won fewer games the past two seasons than the team Harbaugh went out with.

            Making a statement that Shaw took the program to new heights is delusional and devoid of fact.

          14. Yep, three straight championship game appearances in his first three years as a NFL head coach. Never been done before in the history of the National Football League. How ironic you refuse to acknowledge the professional accomplishment, but instead cite the accomplishment of an amatuer at a University not known for their rich football history…..

          15. Where did I say it wasn’t an accomplishment?

            I’ve stated that Harbaugh is a very good coach, and the only reason they move on is if York is forced to make a choice.

            Perhaps you’re mixing my argument up with someone else’s.

          16. Where did I say it wasn’t an accomplishment?

            I said you fail to acknowledge the accomplishment, not that you said it wasn’t. By fail to acknowledge, I mean you brush it aside and praise Shaw for the first back to back Rose Bowl appearances at Stanford in their football rich history laden 40 years.

            If York is worth his salt, he’ll force Harbaugh and Baalke to work it out….

          17. The PAC 12 Champ gets a spot in the Rose Bowl Jack. Getting in because the rest of the conference had more than 2 losses is no great accomplishment. The fact Shaw is 1 and 2 in bowl games also doesn’t support your view that he could step in and replace Harbaugh.

      1. ; >)
        “Lies, Damned Lies, & Statistics”
        IMO, stats are an excellent tool, but like many tools, apparently can’t be entrusted to just anybody.

  25. Off topic musing, scroll on bye if you want….
    The discussion of coaching evokes a memory of my favorite coaching moment, not the best, but my favorite. It’s high school stuff, so has little to do with NFL coaches, or even Big Time college coaching; different game.
    Way back when I was playing for a small, rural school in Arizona in a small school conference. We hosted a team from Tuba City High that we were expected to beat. They were from a Rez and so poor they didn’t have Road White jerseys so we had to wear white. They were smaller and overmatched. A Flu bug ran through their school and they showed up with 13 guys dressed out. We were killing them in the 4Q when they suffered their 3rd injury. They were down to 10 guys and the coaches conferred with the Refs about calling the game. Our coach said “Coach, there’s no quit in your kids’ eyes, how about I pull a guy and we finish this out?” So we finished the game playing 10/10, very awkward, but there was a lot of mutual respect at the end. Those kids went home with pride despite a 40-7 score.

  26. I try to read the Press Democrat sports along with the green sheet daily. I visit Miaocco and Barrows blogs regularly. I watch the Yahoo sports talk on Comcast 3 or 4 times a week. I find it curious that this site is the only place I read or hear this level of criticism of Harbaugh as a head coach. Off the regular and relatively sane posters here, the only one I hear saying the 9ers should trade Harbaugh is Jackhammer and if I understand his opinion he doesn’t want Harbaugh traded because he isn’t a very good NFL coach but because he doesn’t believe a deal will get done and the team should get something for the coach before he walks away. It seems to me the only member of the media who is taking the latest rumors seriously is GC. The only member of the media who is expressing this level of vitriol towards Harbaugh is GC. Yet we are here seriously discussing a neophytes opinion of a highly successful NFL coaches future. Jackhammers take is one that deserves discussion but GC’s is just silly.

    1. Any suggestion of getting rid of a HC with the history of success Harbaugh has is asinine, but we talk about it because it elicits strong opinions. I’m with you coach, the forum is the only reason to come here. News and info are far superior elsewhere.

    2. Coach,

      Yep, that’s how i see it. Thanks for taking the time to understand my position.

      I also don’t want anything to happen until after this season. I think all of the friction could end up being a positive thing for the 2014 season.

    3. Hammer also believes Shaw could do just as good as Harbaugh, if not better. Pay Harbaugh, and he will be around another 3 years. By then, Shaw will have more experience as a head coach.

    4. You and Jack always make sense. Of course, neither one of you is pushing a blog.

      On the other hand, there is another blogger who is blaming Bonds today for MLB’s institutional failure to deal with performance enhancing drugs. Then there is the wink and a nod NFL/Player’s Association take on the issue. I digress …

      Sorry.

        1. If you aren’t making a pretty good joke, and Bonds can teach his ability to diagnose pitchers and select pitches, it should be a great help.

  27. Peeking in here for the first time in a few weeks. I see Grant is still on his Harbaugh on the trading block kick. But you guys are being much too hard on Grant. After all (as he will forever tell us), he correctly predicted the team would replace Smith with Kaepernick. I guess the 2nd round pick status had the rest of us really fooled.

  28. Based on Grants logic that would make grant an average to below average reporter.He has not won the big one yet.

  29. Has Jed York admitted where Trent Baalke, Paraag Marathe and 49ers’ legal/executive assistant Micheline Capaci are on this Sunday afternoon early in March?

    Doesn’t even Grant care anymore?

      1. Given that Jed’s first admission is about 48 hours old, those folks could be in Miami for a big project by tomorrow morning. Where are they right now?

        Speaking of crazy coaches obsessed with winning at any cost, I just watched the first half of the Lombardi’s NFL Life show. Two building years, two winning years, followed by two years without getting to the championship game were very hard on him and everyone around him. He didn’t exactly try to get along with the people who hired him from day one.

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