Brandon Jacobs says Jim Harbaugh knows nothing about football

FILE – In this Aug. 10, 2012, file photo, San Francisco 49ers running back Brandon Jacobs carries against the Minnesota Vikings during an NFL preseason football game in San Francisco. The 49ers parted ways for good with Jacobs on Monday, Dec. 31, 2012, an expected move after the outspoken player was suspended for the final three regular-season games. (AP Photo/Ben Margot, File)

Former NFL running back Brandon Jacobs made some interesting comments recently about Jim Harbaugh on CBS Radio. As you may remember, Jacobs briefly played for the 49ers in 2012, the season they went to the Super Bowl. Here’s what Jacobs said:

“Going somewhere where they don’t have route conversions into certain coverages was just absurd. They’re just running routes in the defense, getting people killed. Size and strength is what they had, and that’s why they won. Let’s be real. They had great assistant coaches, but Jim didn’t know what he was doing. Jim had no idea. Jim is throwing slants into Cover-2 safeties, getting people hurt. That guy knew nothing, man.”

Jacobs is correct that Harbaugh’s offense did not have “route conversions” or “sight adjustments,” as most NFL offenses do. Harbaugh wanted to keep his passing game simple for a couple reasons:

  1. To avoid interceptions.
  2. To allow a limited passer like Colin Kaepernick to function.

Jacobs also is correct that the 49ers won because they had “size and strength” and “great assistant coaches,” such as Vic Fangio, Ed Donatell and Mike Solari.

But, Jacobs sounds moronic and vindictive when he says Harbaugh “knew nothing.” Harbaugh’s winning percentage since 2010 is .745 — roughly three wins every four games. Harbaugh clearly knows something. And he continues to win at Michigan even without Fangio, Donatell or Solari.

Jacobs probably should have kept his mouth shut.

What do you think of Jacobs’ comments?

 

This article has 108 Comments

    1. This^

      Grant, didn’t JH have some of those same passing concepts in place with Alex Smith as well before CK started playing? Or did he change it just for him?

        1. They must be running those same things in KC as AS has a similar INT rate at 1.4, 1.3, 1.5 & 1.6.

          Alex actually had a bump up in INT rate from 2011 to 2012, from 1.1 to 2.3.

          1. Alex is careful with the ball. Its no secret he struggled moving from a college to a NFL offense. I don’t think KC’s offense is much different than what we had here with JH. Strong running game, good TE’s, mediocre QB and WR play. Good enough to keep the game close and use the clock while relying on the defense.

    2. Wow. Just got home and now I’m spitting out my martini. JACOBS! You are a true butt wipe and your jealousy knows no boundaries. Keep your pie hole closed and your own family might begin to respect you. lol

    3. Football is a stupid game played by crybabies and run by advertising executives and rich people. Nothing that happens above the high school football level has any value to any regular human being on the planet.

  1. I know what he’s talking about but he still sounds like a bitter moron. Harbaugh is a better leader than football coach but bottom line is he’s a winner.

  2. “Harbaugh wanted to keep his passing game simple for a couple reasons:
    – To avoid interceptions.
    – To allow a limited passer like Colin Kaepernick to function.”

    I’m afraid Harbaugh does know a thing or two about football…at least to the point of modifying his offense to fit the QB equation…like it or not.

    1. Harb’s was all about his top 5 NFL assistant coaches, a power run game (due to his Bo Schembechler– 3 yds and a cloud of dust days), and play action passing with simplified routes, and stout defense.
      What I liked about Harb’s, was, although his passing game was simplistic, he wasn’t adverse to adding talent to spruce it up: Randy Moss, Ginn Jr., Torey Smith.

      History has worked to our advantage in a weird way. We had to go through many coaches to get Kyle Shanahan, whose offense averaged 400 yrds/game, breaking some NFL offensive records along the way

      1. The problem was when the defense collapsed, he didn’t have the chops to win with offense. In fact when the field position advantage went away, the offense dropped to 25th. But even with the field position advantage, the offense under-performed.

        If our offense performed to NFL averages, our expected scoring in 2013 (#2 field position in the NFL) should have been far closer to 450 points than 406. And that’s just being average (16th) in offensive efficiency. I’m not talking Denver that scored 606 points from average (17th) field position as they destroyed defenses left-and-right until the Superbowl. Just butt-average efficiency and we’d have been a Top-5 scoring offense that year, not 11th.

        The fact is, like it or not, Harbaugh ran a crappy college offense and relied on his defense to win. And Jacobs, bitter or not, has a lot of validity to his criticism. Harbaugh was as much an offensive mastermind as Marty Schottenheimer. Only Schottenheimer was a great defensive coach and not some reputed ‘offensive mastermind’ and ‘QB whisperer’ the press made Harbaugh into.

        1. Yet he still got us 2 yards away from a SuperBowl victory, something we never thought possible under the York’s–we all, including you, Mosses, liked what we saw in comparison.

            1. Just warping backwards in the time machine to recall the Cody Picketts, and JT O’Sullivans and comparing the York’s of then to where Harbaugh brought us.

              I think most 49er fans, being honest, may have disliked Harb’s conservative O, but learned to ignore it due to where we were (under the York’s), to where Harb’s took us.

              1. Cant believe I am agreeing with TrollD, but I agree that JH made the Niners relevant. JH did take that under performing squad and make it better, and got to 3 NFCC games in a row.
                .
                Too bad Jed preferred a suit over a coach.

          1. Tom’s right. Contrary to what Moses said about Harbaugh not having the chops to win with offense when the defense collapsed, he did just that during the SB run. The defense was terrible after Justin Smith was injured right through the end of the season and playoffs. The offense carried them to the SB.

        2. I certainly wouldn’t put Harbaugh in the genius category, but he’s not a Rich Kotite (the Jet incarnation) either. Having a talented coaching staff on board was a significant factor for Harbs.

        3. The fact is, like it or not, Harbaugh ran a crappy college offense and relied on his defense to win. And Jacobs, bitter or not, has a lot of validity to his criticism. Harbaugh was as much an offensive mastermind as Marty Schottenheimer. Only Schottenheimer was a great defensive coach and not some reputed ‘offensive mastermind’ and ‘QB whisperer’ the press made Harbaugh into.

          Not even remotely accurate. Harbaugh ran an offense befitting what he had on the roster and one that would work in tandem with the defense by limiting turnovers. You are one of a handful of Harbaugh bashers on here and it’s comical. Harbaugh wins because he knows how to run a team, motivate them and put them in the best position to succeed. This has been collaborated by most who have played for him. He knows the game better than most Coaches active today. He played for over 20 years through College and the pros, worked as an assistant Coach under his Father, worked as a QB’s Coach for the Raiders, took over two lousy College programs and turned them into winners. He then took an NFL team that had won jack in a decade to a SB and 3 straight NFC Title games. Do you not realize how ridiculous you look when you try to downplay what the man has done? Save the stats and look at the big picture: the man produces results and it’s not because of being carried by anybody. He’s the only constant in all the places he’s won which just happens to be every where he’s been.

          Jacobs is carrying a grudge because Harbaugh pretty much ended his career by not playing him. Looks bad on him and those on here who are feebly trying to agree with him.

          1. What are you doing now, or with your life? Losing like you did all your life Rocket. Just keep your crap to yourself

            1. Whoa there. If you don’t like opinions you might want to go somewhere else. Most of us here can handle an opposing view point without telling others to keep their opinions to themselves.

            2. What are you doing now, or with your life? Losing like you did all your life Rocket. Just keep your crap to yourself

              Dad is that you?

              1. Funny!
                Did your Dad, Uncles, and older siblings ‘Bap’ you on de back of yo head growing up? Hahahahahahahaha
                My family was Anglo, so the Bro, Uncles, and Dad could only ‘Bap’ us when the women folk weren’t watching.
                ; >)
                My Italian friends got it from their Moms and Nonas too! But they said the Nuns were the worst!

          2. It was, literally, Stanford’s offense (run with heavy play action) which was the offense Bo Schembechler ran at Michigan. In 2012/2103 they added the Pistol (UNR) to it to use Kaepernick’s running.

            So I don’t how the **** anyone could say it wasn’t a college offense. Seriously, Michigan + Pistol. That’s a college as it gets. And while it’ll work perfectly well in the running game, the NFL is about passing.

            There was no NFL passing game involved. The route trees were primitive . There were no route combinations designed to move the QB from his first read to his second to his third. It was just PA drop back, people go deep, run a crossing underneath and hope for the best.

            Just like Michigan.So, you want to pretend otherwise, feel free. But we ran the Michigan/Pistol offense.

            1. It’s not strictly a College offense at all in fact it’s unlike most College offenses that have moved to spread systems entirely. He’s always run pro concepts and didn’t use the pistol until he had Kaepernick. He traditionally runs a power/play action based system which is a combination of different concepts he’s picked up from a number of different Coaches. He’s said many times that he’s been influenced by Ted Marchibroda, Lindy Infante, Bo Schembechler, Bill Walsh and his father in a number of different ways. To suggest he doesn’t understand NFL route combinations and passing concepts is either complete ignorance or a lack of objectivity due to not liking the man.

              He put in a system in SF based on who he had and the time he had. His first year they didn’t have an offseason to implement anything so it had to be relatively simple. From there it was just making use of the talent at his disposal and it worked pretty well considering both QB’s that played for him during that time have proven to be average to below average at best. He adapted his offense a few times during his 4 years as I mentioned in another post and won with offense when he needed to as the run to the SB clearly shows.

              If you truly want to delude yourself into thinking – a man who played QB in the league for 15 years under some of the top offensive minds in NFL history – doesn’t understand route trees or NFL passing concepts, be my guest, but it is an asinine stance and one not supported by common sense.

              1. I have several thoughts and unanswered questions that challenge several of your thoughtful beliefs Rocket.

                (1) Harbaugh’s Stanford offense utilized three OC’s with separate and distinct scheme and play calling responsibilities (Greg Roman, Pep Hamilton and David Shaw). Why did he think his rushing game coordinator (Roman) was capable of coordinating and calling a passing offense against the NFL’s best defensive coordinators?

                (2) Given the limitations of his “below average” quarterbacks, why didn’t Harbaugh ever improve cumbersome play calling and poor clock management, or coach situational football to improve third down and red zone efficiency?

                (3) With influences like Schembechler and Walsh, why did he under utilize his running backs as receivers and safety valves? Gore, Hunter and James were relatively ignored as receivers compared to how other coaches have used them.

                (4) Aside from maybe Anquan Boldin, can you name any free agent or drafted receiver, tight end and running back who developed into anything meaningful or demonstratively improved under Harbaugh’s coaching? In four seasons, you should be able to name 3-4 players. none come to my mind…

                (5) As an avid 49ers fan, I recall lots of praise for the 49ers rushing game, but I don’t recall a single article, column or analytical expert praise the schemes or routes of Harbaugh’s passing game. In fact, a quick google search will show many critics. So who is deluded? Generate a single written or spoken word that praises Harbaugh’s route trees or passing concepts.

                (6) Harbaugh reportedly wanted to draft Kaepernick. Harbaugh opted for Kaepernick over Alex Smith. So the shift to the pistol was manufactured entirely by a series of Harbaugh’s decisions. Rather than excusing Harbaugh’s failings by pointing to Kaepernick, assign responsibility to Harbaugh. He engineered it.

              2. Capelle,

                Thanks for asking. Answers are below:

                (1) Harbaugh’s Stanford offense utilized three OC’s with separate and distinct scheme and play calling responsibilities (Greg Roman, Pep Hamilton and David Shaw). Why did he think his rushing game coordinator (Roman) was capable of coordinating and calling a passing offense against the NFL’s best defensive coordinators?

                He did the same thing with the 49ers actually. Roman had the OC title, but other Coaches on staff and Harbaugh himself put together the passing game during the week and called some of the plays during the game. Also, as I pointed out previously, the passing game was effective for most of the time Harbaugh was there. They just didn’t pass as much as they ran.

                (2) Given the limitations of his “below average” quarterbacks, why didn’t Harbaugh ever improve cumbersome play calling and poor clock management, or coach situational football to improve third down and red zone efficiency?

                How do you know he didn’t try? It still comes down to players executing and the 3rd down and Red zone efficiency did improve each season for the first 3 years. The clock management was a problem, no argument, but that has nothing to do with the concepts within the system.

                (3) With influences like Schembechler and Walsh, why did he under utilize his running backs as receivers and safety valves? Gore, Hunter and James were relatively ignored as receivers compared to how other coaches have used them.

                Because he preferred a play action passing game and Kap really didn’t like checking down. If they had failed to have success in what they did, I’d agree with you, but their passing game was largely effective in the way they used it.

                (4) Aside from maybe Anquan Boldin, can you name any free agent or drafted receiver, tight end and running back who developed into anything meaningful or demonstratively improved under Harbaugh’s coaching? In four seasons, you should be able to name 3-4 players. none come to my mind…

                The better question to ask is: who did they draft or sign during Harbaugh’s tenure, and did they really have a chance to unseat the vets already on the roster? The players that were already staples like Davis and Crabtree both played well under Harbaugh and Crabtree had his best season in that offense. Gore continued to play well and Hunter did as well until he was injured. Boldin came in and had his best season in years. Who is it that he was supposed to develop while he was there that he didn’t? Baalke was pathetic in drafting offensive skill players.

                (5) As an avid 49ers fan, I recall lots of praise for the 49ers rushing game, but I don’t recall a single article, column or analytical expert praise the schemes or routes of Harbaugh’s passing game. In fact, a quick google search will show many critics. So who is deluded? Generate a single written or spoken word that praises Harbaugh’s route trees or passing concepts.

                So what? It’s been established that his passing game was pretty simple already so you’re arguing a strawman here. What was suggested by Brandon Jacobs was that Harbaugh didn’t know what he was doing and it’s ludicrous considering the number of years this man has spent playing or Coaching the game of football. There is a big difference between knowing how to do something and deciding what is best for your particular roster. Alex Smith was a mess when Harbaugh arrived and he turned his career around in one season by implementing a simple passing game with clear and easy reads. He then took a 2nd year QB who played in a simplistic passing offense in College and did the same thing.

                (6) Harbaugh reportedly wanted to draft Kaepernick. Harbaugh opted for Kaepernick over Alex Smith. So the shift to the pistol was manufactured entirely by a series of Harbaugh’s decisions. Rather than excusing Harbaugh’s failings by pointing to Kaepernick, assign responsibility to Harbaugh. He engineered it.

                What responsibility do you want me to assign to Harbaugh? The responsibility of taking Kaepernick and Coaching him to two NFCCG’s and a SB? You seem to be missing a rather large point here: Kap played well under Harbaugh. His worst season in Harbaugh’s Coaching tenure was the last year when injuries and Jed York’s Locker room leaks and Tweets sabotaged the season, and even then Kap was middle of the pack statistically. Harbaugh didn’t coach Kap the past two years so why in the world should he receive criticism for it?

                You are trying to find fault with a system that got the most out of a couple of limited QB’s and it doesn’t make any sense to me. Would you prefer he had come in and put in something the QB’s struggled in? Do you not see Alex Smith continuing to put up average to below average numbers under one of the best offensive Coaches in football in Andy Reid? Harbaugh got the most out of what he had and has done that everywhere he’s been. I understand if some are put off by his personality and competitive nature, but that has nothing to do with his knowledge of the game. Most of the comments being made – from Jacobs to fans on this board agreeing with him – are based on dislike of the individual. You can’t argue with success and Harbaugh has achieved it every where he’s been with different assistant Coaches, different players and different schemes. The man knows the game better than most that are Coaching today.

    2. I agree, Cassie. I also agree with much of what Jacobs said, though not necessarily with his choice of words. Yes, Harbaugh inherited a QB in Alex Smith who had been asked to do too much season after season with new Head Coaches and Offensive Coordinators. Harbaugh & Roman’s simplistic offense allowed for just enough smoke and mirrors to hide Smith’s and Kaepernick’s weaknesses. But, Jacobs is right that Harbaugh was way too willing if not inclined to put his receivers in harm’s way. No matter how much of a lead his team had, he would continue “grinding” the team. How many receivers and running backs became injured late in the 4th quarters of games decided by blowout scores. I’ve been saying this for a very long time now: Jim Harbaugh is not a good person. To be sure, he is a great leader; but he’s controlling, self-centered, can stare into the camera without blinking while also lying from both sides of his mouth, and cares nothing at all about the health of his players. How much work would it have been for him to learn and teach route conversions that adjust to defensive adjustments? I suppose for a man who is all about NOW NOW NOW, such teachings would have taken too much time. I for one was happy to see him go. If not for Harbaugh’s grind it style of coaching, who knows if Patrick Willis, Justin Smith, Anthony Davis, Chris Borland (to name only the first players to mind) would have stuck around for 1 or 2 more seasons

      1. Lol happy to see him go?? How relevant has san fran been since harbaugh left? How many wins have u guys had since he left? Like 7,8,9? He was what 40 something n 20…. lol u crack me up dude😂

        1. He was already fading when he left. He won on defense, when that fell, the offense fell.

          Do you really think the #25 offense he was generating behind Kaepernick was going to be successful without an elite defense to carry it? No. It wasn’t. That kind of offense is a placeholder for an elite defense.

      2. Folkwolf, besides Josh Morgan who are you thinking JH got hurt? Kendall Hunter and one of our recievers got hurt late in a Seattle game but we were still competing to win that game. Crabtree tore an Achilles in camp.

      3. You insinuate that the problem was that harbaugh didn’t have the knowledge to teach route conversions rather than the obvious answer that he didn’t have the players to execute it. It is hard to explain how a person with his lifetime of football success and experience could be less knowledgeable than a poster on this website.

  3. SANTA CLARA —

    Did you sign a big-money deal with the 49ers recently? Are you a former first-round draft pick?

    Yeah, so what?

    That’s the message the team’s incoming regime appears to be sending early on. That is, just because you were a favorite of former general manager Trent Baalke doesn’t mean you’ll have a similar standing with us.

    Joshua Garnett, for example, was a first-round pick a year ago who started 11 games at right guard. When last week’s OTA practice began, however, newcomer Brandon Fusco mostly was playing right guard with the first-team unit. Garnett, whom Pro Football Focus ranked 70th out of 72 guards last year, mostly was playing on the left side with the second team.

    Read more here: http://www.sacbee.com/sports/nfl/san-francisco-49ers/article153354634.html#storylink=cpy

    1. Joshua Garnett was a terrible pick. He was a road grader who didn’t fit chip’s scheme and doesn’t fit Kyle’s scheme. It’s like Baalke forgot that Roman was no longer running the offense.
      And to top it off we could have had Myles Jack.

  4. TomD’s Take: Many (including myself) wondered in the weirdness of Trent Baalke signing extensions to players when a new coach was about to be hired….EXTREMLELY BAD MOVE JED !

    * Players who recently signed hefty free-agent deals or contract extensions also have no special status. In fact, you could argue that those types of deals have put a bull’s-eye on players.

    1. Receiver Torrey Smith, who signed the biggest free-agent deal of the Baalke era, was released
    2. The 49ers recently acknowledged trying to trade tight end Vance McDonald, who signed a contract extension in December
    3. Team officials denied a report they were shopping linebacker NaVorro Bowman as well. Bowman signed a large contract extension last summer, which was odd considering he still had three years left on his current deal at the time.
    4. the two-year extension weak-side linebacker Ray-Ray Armstrong signed in December —
    5. the team signed Malcolm Smith to a big free-agent contract

    All of which begs the question: Why did the 49ers allow a general manager who was on shaky footing in 2016, decidedly so in December, to extend the contracts of certain players?

    At the time, the 49ers figured that anyone who took over would appreciate the moves.

    Six months later, however, none of the maneuvers seem that wise.

  5. The San Francisco 49ers are experimenting with a variety of changes along their offensive line

    1. Adding Zuttah, via a trade with the Baltimore Ravens, means Kilgore won’t be the shoo-in at center. That’s a good thing. Centers are of utmost importance to a Shanahan offense.
    But the good news is the loser of this starting battle could kick out to the guard spot. And former Los Angeles Rams center Tim Barnes keeps both Zuttah and Kilgore on their toes.

    2. Gilliam isn’t going to overtake Brown. Gilliam is much more nimble on his feet but, according to the Santa Rosa Press Democrat’s Grant Cohn, Gilliam was having all kinds of trouble blocking edge rushers Arik Armstead and Ronald Blair during the Niners’ first week of OTAs. Gilliam isn’t a good pass blocker. Beadles could, in theory, but Brown is a much better option in pass protection. Yet it doesn’t take too much to identify an issue here. With Brown’s struggles in run support.

    3. With a 40.2 overall PFF grade last year, Beadles was certainly among the worst 49ers starters in 2016.
    His opposite number, Garnett, had a disappointing rookie season last year. His 42.4 PFF grade wasn’t much better than Beadles, and there are also questions as to how he’d fit in a zone-blocking scheme.

    And this might describe why San Francisco brought in Fusco, whose 52.8 PFF grade a year ago is already better than what both Garnett and Beadles posted in 2016.

    TomD’s Take: The 49ers will employ a combination: outside zone blocking, left side, with power on the right side (due to Trent Brown’s bad run blocking grade). Brown’s run-blocking grade in 2016 netted a lowly 39.0 mark — 72nd out of 79 qualifiers in this category.

    http://www.49erswebzone.com/commentary/1686-49ers-offensive-line-san-franciscos-unit-flux/

  6. I think you pretty much covered it. Regardless of what Harbaugh knows or doesn’t know about football the guy wins games. Impossible to argue with the results.

  7. Eli Harold was picked in the third round of the 2015 draft, and was considered by a number of draft writers as a steal at this spot for the 49ers.
    A pure speed-rusher, Eli Harold has first-class burst and follows it up well with length and hand usage as a pass-rusher. His surprising strength allows him to bull-rush and fight blockers.

    There should certainly be some hope however that the transition into Robert Saleh’s aggressive one gapping scheme should bring out the best in Harold. The scheme should help to accentuate his athletic capabilities and help him to radically improve

    Height 6’3 ; Weight: 265 lbs; Age: 23–Experience: 2 accrued seasons

    Currently, Harold appears to be the 49ers’ second choice strong-side (SAM) linebacker, behind veteran Ahmad Brooks. This role is essentially the same as he was asked to play in his first two seasons in the league, lining up outside the tackle and either setting the edge against the run.

    Harold could be used as a specialist pass rusher in addition to being the SAM linebacker, resulting in him seeing more snaps.
    http://www.ninersnation.com/2017/5/30/15709900/49ers-roster-breakdowns-90-in-90-eli-harold

  8. The only reason I didn’t get upset when Harbaugh left was because he SOLD US OUT his final year!!! He should have fired Greg Roman after 6-8games but he didn’t want to fire his buddy!!! Our Defense was still stout & I think we had like a 6-4 record (still very much in the wildcard race). . . He should have taken a page from his brother. . Baltimore fired their off. coordinator after 10 or so games the year we played them in the SuperBowl!!! (Our situation was EXACTLY the same but Jim Harbaugh chose his BUDDY GREG ROMAN over what was BEST for the 49ers at that time!!!)

    1. And who should have been promoted to OC if he fired Roman Ed? You can’t bring in anybody from the outside and install a new system half way through the season, so who was Harbaugh supposed to put in Roman’s place in your mind?

      There is also the fact that the 9ers were 7-4 with an injury riddled team so firing the OC really wasn’t a priority.

  9. Harbaugh is a very good head coach. He wins where ever he goes.
    Is he Bill Walsh? No. He is not an offensive mastermind. He likes power football, he hires good assistants and he can lead a football team.
    Jacobs comments have a ring of truth, but he took it way too far.
    I also think Harbaugh is best suited for the college game. His act seems to get old after a few years so having a complete roster change every four to five years works out for the best for all concerned.

  10. sorry but i for one hate fake news and the media. you got nothing to write so you talk about some fb who is deranged from hits in the head and you make a big deal out of it. who is he an all pro? how many rings does he have does he even play football? why not just go talk to some holes insane person not taking his meds? we besmirch a hc who played in the nfl, won everywhere he has gone, went to a super bowl, turned the miserable 49er players to probowlers in one year. if the talent on the niners got them to the super bowl not harbaugh, then how come they couldn’t even reach 50% before and after he was there? too many crybaby entitlement generation whining in the media. giving this credibility is stupid on my part……wanna complain about assistants better than the coach, how bout them cowboys with jimmy johnson?

    1. Fake as utterly false and completely fabricated; an outright lie? Or information of no value, mostly irrelevant, and who cares? Yes, this isn’t the most earth shattering item to dissect, but Brandon J. did make the Harbaugh assertion in the media. Are there more important things to discuss? I’d say yes. I agree that Harbaugh was a difference maker. Brandon’s being Brandon.

      Funny…adults in positions of power in the 60s described the baby boom generation as self absorbed, spoiled, and entitlement-driven. Wonder what adults in the 30s called the emerging generation that had to deal with what the 40s dished out…lazy, pleasure seeking, etc. Been that way for eons, and will be into the future.

    2. “how many rings does he have?”

      Jacobs has two Super Bowl rings playing with the New York Giants. Niner you and Jacobs are both irrelevant ranters. Cheers.

  11. Is Jacobs bitter? Yes, but he is also right. However, Harbaugh wanted Manning. That would have drastically changed the offense. Harbaugh hitched his wagon to Kap. BIG MISTAKE.

    I’m bitter that Jacobs only had 7 YDs for us. Nobody was expecting him to be an All Pro, but I thought he would give us something. He didn’t though. He whined like a bitch for carries that he didn’t deserve.

    1. What ?…Dylan Thompson over Kaep !!!

      Now that takes the (Seb’s) cake. …Hold on I hear him about to recite a poem describing himself:

      ’Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
      Did gyre and gimble in the wabe

      “Beware the Jabberwock, my son!

      The jaws that bite, the claws that catch!
      Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun
      The frumious Bandersnatch!”

      And, as in uffish thought he stood,
      The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame,
      Came whiffling through the tulgey wood,
      And burbled as it came!

    1. This makes sense #80 considering that there’s no real back up to Ward if he’s injured. And the reality that our DB’s need to do well in man coverage in this system. Outside of Robinson’s rookie campaign we’re pretty thin. I don’t think Tartt is great in coverage and as Grant points out he takes bad angles in run coverage. Seems like they’re not happy yet. Who knows if Reid can play SS. Seems like the season depends on this group to decide if we’re a 2-4 win team or a 6-9 win team.

  12. Harbaugh actually is a very good offensive Coach. He’s changed his system many times over the years to take advantage of the players he had. He is a run and play action guy at heart, but he didn’t mind throwing the ball more when he had Andrew Luck. He put some WCO plays into the passing game when he had access to the Walsh tapes. He and Roman went and studied the pistol offense so they could put in plays for Kaepernick and almost rode it all the way to a SB win. When teams started figuring out the pistol, Harbaugh and Roman put in a spread passing game in 2014 and had quite a bit of success with it until the Oline started falling apart after the Denver game.

    Trying to say somebody who comes from a Coaching family, who played for two decades and who has taken every team he’s Coached from doormats to winners, doesn’t know what he’s doing is so beyond ridiculous it can’t even be measured on the stupidity scale.

    1. Too bad he’s never won when it matters most!
      And the fact he thought he could gimmick his way to a championship with a one trick pony QB.
      The irony in all this is that his own brother exposed him.
      He’s a coach with a shelf life. And the fact is he never can win quick enough before he starts to wear out his welcome.

  13. BJ, you’re an absolute monster and still a horrible running back. You’re just mad bc you were benched behind backs who were all and all just better than you…get over it brah

  14. This is a copy of another article ,,,,,,on fox sports web site,,,,,,,Nunzio Ingrassia
    May 28, 2017 at 4:30p ET.

    1. First of all, if you are accusing someone of plagiarism then you should have given the link to the said article. Second, Grant just puts this hot potato out there to get reactions. I suppose if it is a copy, Grant could have said “Taken from the Fox Sports website.” If that’s true, Grant has no reason to claim it as his own and I’m sure he won’t.

  15. JH wins wherever he coaches. Jacobs is a bitter has been. Non-story. Thanks for the news on Dylan, MW, I can’t wait to read the Seb response and rational.

    1. Hmm, interesting, wonder if they are not sold on Goff.
      .
      My rationale is that Kroenke wants smooth sailing, and Kaep would ignite s QB controversy. Sounds like the Blackball is going strong and well.
      .
      Surely, you are not implying that DT is superior to Kaep? Then I will be questioning your football acumen.

              1. Your grasping, Sebbs.

                I’ll just cut to the chase and reiterate, to you-for kap………………

                HASTA LA VISTA, BABY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  16. I wish to appeal to Brandon Jacobs higher ideals. Dissing JH and wanting to tear him down is just hate, and it will consume him. He should aspire to loftier goals, like providing low cost housing and building schools.

  17. No Seb, on the contrary. You’ve read my equation I’m sure. His unemployment is a combination of his mediocre talent, his divisive sideline activism, and his out of touch contract expectations. It’s certainly not 100% blackball, or even more preposterous, 100% talent. That argument is laughable, considering the wretched QB’s that have been signed. I’d put the percentages this way. 60% blackball, 45% talent, 5% contract. He isn’t good enough to counter balance the negative backlash the organization would would encounter not only from the fan base, but from the community in general, along with advertisers and other financial entities. I predicted long ago on this site that his career was over, due in large part to his divisive activism. So far I’m right but there’s still a long way to go. And you say? I’d say at this point it’s 70/30 that he never straps up again.

    1. We will just have to agree to disagree.
      .
      Kaep is a SB QB who has set records. DT is lucky to have a job. Kaep will play again, especially if a team wants to really win, and their QB goes down due to injury.

      1. SB participating QB. Not winner, loser.
        Records? It’s not the Guinness Book of World records. It’s about winning and keeping a job.
        The guy you are referring to hasn’t in the last 3 years.
        Shut up already

  18. I think Kaep is realizing that it’s important to play this year. If he doesn’t get signed this year, it will make it harder to sign in the future. That’s why I’m thinking that he might take any offer he can get. Of course, if an owner really despised him, he would sign him, not let him play in the pre-season games and then have him cut at the end of TC.

  19. Years ago I played at a NCGA 2 handicap. I played on teams in competitive golf leagues at Bennett Valley, Northwood and Windsor. Now I’m a NCGA 18. I play with my buddies for fun. No more competitive leagues. The moral of the story is it doesn’t matter what you did 5 years ago, or 20 years ago, or 3 years ago. It’s about what you can do now, and what you have done recently. CK is not very good at this moment in time. Now. The film and the record doesn’t lie. It is irrefutable. It’s irrelevant what he did 4-5 years ago.

  20. NFL Teams want to make money, period. Until some owner thinks CK can help his team make more $$ than a potential loss of fans, sponsorship and TV ratings, CK won’t be signed. Too much risk for s long shot.

  21. Brandon Jacob is nothing more than an over the hill crybaby doing his best to be relevant.
    He should be grateful that the 49ers gave him a chance to keep his broken career going.
    I mean, did he really think that he was going to share snaps with Frank Gore?
    Interesting and foolish that he would try to denigrate Harbaugh during a Super Bowl season.
    Pick your battles wisely Brah.
    This one blew up in your face!

  22. If Steve Young or Jerry Rice were saying this then I would be inclined to listen. But Jacobs is a one hit wonder and has no NFL cred. This idiot is just trying to get the spotlight on an otherwise fizzed-out career.

  23. Your exactly right AZ. The investment is certainly not worth the risk. Well said AES. His comments fall under the phrase, “Better to remain silent and be thought a fool then to speak and remove all doubt”!

  24. Brandon Jacobs is right about his comments. All of them. Harbaugh didn’t know how to Coach as a HC at the NFL level when Jacobs was there. However, one of Jim Harbaugh’s greatest attributes is that he knows what he doesn’t know.
    Jim Harbaugh surrounded himself with experience and expertise. Jim Harbaugh is a leader of men. He allowed each man on his staff to do their jobs and he got the most of out each individual under his charge.
    I was disappointed Brandon Jacobs was not utilized more. I am disappointed Brandon Jacobs allowed his ego to speak louder than his play. I am disappointed Jim Harbaugh was unable to get through to Jacobs.

    1. Didn’t know how to Coach at the NFL level? He took a bad team before he arrived to three straight NFCCG’s and a SB. He’s had different assistant Coaches every where he’s been and has continued to win. Seriously give your head a shake.

  25. Never ceases to amaze (and disgust) me to see former players bash their coaches. Jacobs was clearly at the very end of his NFL career when Harbaugh threw him a bone to play for the Niners. BJ failed miserably. Maybe he thought he was going to be the featured RB…surprise, nyet. I get Harbaugh rubs some the wrong way…but, he’s a very successful head coach at both the NFL and college level. If I were Jacobs, I’d cease & desist, because he’s in a no-win situation. He probably won’t, which will only continue to make him look like a huge sour grape.

  26. Along with emotional regulation, Harbaugh had a difficult time with clock management he never met a timeout he wouldn’t or couldn’t unnecessarily burn.

  27. Jacobs is entitled to his opinion, as you are. He’s probably still mad because the Niners told him during the season they no longer needed his services. And, I think SF still paid him. Had we had Jacobs in the Super Bowl, perhaps we could have powered in a run. Jacobs had the size and skill even at that stage in his career. Gore was too small to punch it in.

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