Eric Reid on Marlon Moore: “He’s a deep threat for this team. He’s reliable.”

SANTA CLARA – Eric Reid spoke in the 49ers’ media tent Tuesday afternoon. Here’s what he said.

Q: After studying your performance from Game 1, what was your takeaway?

REID: I felt comfortable. I do think there were some things I can improve on, but for the most part I felt like I had a good game. I made some tackles. We didn’t give up a big play on defense, that’s always good. But we need to get better.

Q: You’re going to be facing Aaron Rodgers Week 1. If you’re going to start that game, do you want to be starting these preseason games?

REID: I try not to look too far ahead. We’ve got a pretty good quarterback here that I go against on a daily basis. I’m trying to use that every day to get better. When the coach decides who is the starter, whether it’s me or it’s another guy, I’m going to try to help this team out in any way that I can.

Q: Kaepernick throws some 40-yard lasers. Has that been eye-opening for you? I assume you didn’t see that even in the SEC.

REID: I don’t imagine it gets much tougher than that. Coming out of the middle and he throws 40 yards on a line, you’ve got to take a pretty sharp angle to get there and meet the ball. That’s helping me out. You’ve got to take that mindset into every practice that you’ve got to get better, because Kap will make you look bad if you’re not on your toes.

Q: Does that change what the definition of good coverage is to you?

REID: Oh yeah, it definitely does. If you’re a half step behind a guy, he’ll put it in there. It’s great for me in preparing for the season getting to go against Kaeprenick every day in practice.

Q: How do they coach hitting?

REID: It’s all about the technique of a tackle. We do the bag drills. You’ve got to make sure your feet are in the ground. For me, it’s not lunging at a guy. Coach Donatell likes to say you get your power from the ground. As long as you have good mechanics and your feet are on the ground and you make contact, you can deliver a blow.

ME: We just interviewed Marlon Moore. What’s your assessment of him as a wide receiver from playing against him in practice?

REID: Speed guy. He is a deep threat for this team. Yesterday he caught a nice ball on the sideline. He’s reliable. We can send him down the field and throw him the ball. But for me, I’ve got to get him covered so I’ve got to make sure I take good angles and I have to get to him.

Q: Do you have a bit of back issue?

REID: It was tight. The other day it tightened up on me, so the trainers wanted to hold me back a little bit just to make sure I didn’t overstrain it. I’m good now. I just had to get it stretched out. I saw a chiropractor yesterday. I didn’t know my spine could pop that much. They fixed me up.

Q: Were you a full go yesterday?

REID: Yeah.

Q: How much film study have you done for the Chiefs?

REID: Today was really the first day we watched some stuff on special teams. I think the coaches are going to figure out what they want to do as far as the game plan.

Q: How much have you had to cover Vernon Davis in practice and what has that been like?

REID: I’ve covered him quite a bit. Yesterday he ran open down the seam and I had to go get him from the other side of the field. I thought he was getting the ball but thanks to our pass rush, Kap wasn’t able to throw it. He’s definitely a threat. I don’t want to sound redundant, but it’s fortunate for me that I get to go against him because I don’t know if there’s a better tight end in the league.

Q: How does he compare to other tight ends you faced in college? Does he seem to be more athletic, faster?

REID: Is that a serious question? That can’t be a serious question. He doesn’t compare at all. He can line up at receiver if he wants to. I think that’s something they might be working on. They could do that if they had to. He’s probably the biggest, fastest, strongest tight end in this league.

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  1. Great interview. I hope Reid proves me wrong about my belief that the Niners reached when drafting him (which I think he will.)

    1. I sort of felt the same way during the draft. Not Reid in particular, but a safety in general. Like you, I hope the kid proves me wrong like Aldon did.

    1. MidWestNiner,
      Nice video. May only qualms regarding Moore is why couldn’t he stick in Miami?
      Are their (Dolphins) WR’ pro-bowl level WR’s that made it impossible for Moore to win a roster spot?

      Moore is a complete mystery to me, and that gives me pause.

      1. Moore is an unproven deep threat who runs a 4.49. The Dolphins decided to go in another direction and sign Mike Wallace to a big-money contract to be their deep threat.

      2. Moore spent 3 years at Miami after impressing enough as an undrafted rookie to make their 53-man roster in 2010.

        However, on a WR starved Dolphins roster he was unable to work his way into any meaningful playing time in those 3 years (I believe he actually saw his most playing time in his rookie year). As a result, the Dolphins were willing to let him go as a RFA without offering him a tender this offseason.

      3. However, on a WR starved Dolphins roster he was unable to work his way into any meaningful playing time in those 3 years (I believe he actually saw his most playing time in his rookie year). As a result, the Dolphins were willing to let him go as a RFA without offering him a tender this offseason.

        That is why I think that Moore will do great here if he can make the final roster Scooter. He has a massive chip on his shoulder after that. And from Grant’s reports and the fact that he played with the starters against the Broncos support my theory so far.

      4. Moore is an unproven deep threat who runs a 4.49. The Dolphins decided to go in another direction and sign Mike Wallace to a big-money contract to be their deep threat.

        I’d take Moore over Wallace in a heartbeat. Wallace is too much of a diva and checks out during a game at times.

      5. MidWest, you don’t think going undrafted was enough to put a chip on his shoulder? Didn’t seem to help him make it at the Dolphins.

        He’s doing enough in TC to get noticed, with a lot of positive plays. This is also what he did at the Dolphins the past 3 years. While I hope he develops into a solid starting WR, I don’t feel comfortable at this point that he’s a starting calibre WR.

        Taking Moore over Wallace… I don’t even know what to say to that. While I think Wallace is somewhat over-rated and overpaid, he’s a legitimate deep threat WR that has proven very capable at getting open deep the past few seasons.

      6. Like I have said earlier, I think that Moore will be our version of Wes Welker Scooter. Going undrafted probably put a chip on his shoulder but being let go and having hardly any bites in free agency significantly increased the size of that chip.

        Wallace is a legitimate deep threat but he is inconsistent and turns off his motor whenever it suits him. That isn’t someone who I would want on this team (which is the criteria I judge any player with).

      7. What do you mean by that? That Moore will end up being a great slot WR like Welker? I think he is mainly being seen as an outside WR, and he hasn’t shown the same knack for working the underneath areas.

        Or do you mean like Welker in terms of an undrafted FA that spent 3 years at Miami? I guess there is some similarity there. But unlike Moore, Welker worked his way up every year. In his 3rd season he caught over 60 passes, which was why they tendered him at a 2nd round level as a RFA. So aside from being undrafted and spending 3 years in Miami, not a similar scenario.

        Don’t get me wrong, I hope he does do well. But he’s now a 4th year vet that was let go by a team that was desperate for WRs. Doesn’t exactly shout ‘success story’.

      8. I mean that he will develop into a great WR Scooter. Please don’t read anything else into it. Also compare our QBs to the Dolphins QBs that he played with. And Austin Collie will be our slot WR.

      9. You two talking about Miami’s great receivers? That’s like trying to talk about San Francisco’s great receivers from 2005-2012–you can’t do it, because there’s never been a QB worth a damn in Miami.

        Just axe Brandon Marshall.

      10. ‘there’s never been a QB worth a damn in Miami’
        Bob Greise had at least one decent season; 17-0/Super Bowl Champions. That’s worth a damn and a half I’d say.
        Dan Marino set a lot of passing records and won a lot of games; a lot of games. One of the best passers the game has ever seen. That’s worth a damn and a little bit.

      11. Brotha, no doubt E didn’t mean the entire history of the Dolphins franchise – a scout of his caliber has to recognize the talent of a Dan Marino.

        But it was just his way of making another childish dig at Alex Smith. Man, some people just can’t let go.

      12. Rib

        Thx for clearing that up for BroT. Obviously I wasn’t referring to days of yore.

        Equally obvious is my objectivity regarding Niners QBs since Young. I don’t dig at Alex Smith, and take exception to you misconstruing my words. As I’ve pointed out repeatedly, and as is born out in facts and stats, Alex Smith underutilized the WR position during his time here, same as the peashooters in Miami have done over the same time period.

        I don’t dislike Alex, but I do dislike those fans of the Niners who play revisionist and somehow anoint the guy as anything but a massive bust. I know he was largely set up for failure by an incompetent ownership and mishandled (even maliciously, at times) by the 2 Mikes. But what is indisputable is that Alex was Emperor of the Checkdown and Enemy of the State of Wide Receivers.

        Where a team has a QB who cannot/will not get the ball into WRs hands, those WRs cannot be accurately gauged, and the ones who have talent (i.e., Crabtree/Marshall/Lloyd) more often exude displeasure at their plight than they do excitement at the prospect of playing with such impotent passers. You can imagine how enthused Marlon Moore must be right now to be playing with Kaep, who puts 40 yard frozen ropes through 8″ windows. There’s no way to judge Moore’s mettle as a #2. To be determined …

        And just another fact for you Rib, King of the Revisionists:

        Alex Smith never met a backup who couldn’t take his job from him. Check that stat. Disprove it in an honest way. You won’t be able to.

      13. Rib,Tarzan the former self proclaimed NFL scout and retired Mr.Thurston Howell III needs some stroking so what better way to draw up an Alex debate. Feel bad for the lonely guy!

      14. Unhinged theatricality!!! Thank you, CB!

        I see Rib and CB are still consorting with the cancer patient mocker, world-record holding censor-earning, biteless flea.

        CB & Rib. Do better. Ditch your shadow. And address the substance. I was as big a supporter of Alex as anyone on here until Kaep proved himself with that 54 yard bomb to Kyle Williams against the Bears. And then, as simple as that, adios chump. But that wasn’t the point. The point was that Marlon Moore’s potential could not be gauged properly because he had subpar QB play in Miami. Just like Crabtree and Williams had subpar QB play in SF until Kaep arrived. Call him elite if you want to, and I agree that in many ways he was elite (checkdowns, sustained drives, ball security, work ethic, command if the offense), but as far as anticipating throws, driving the ball downfield, and leading TD drives, all if which largely depend on connecting with WRs, Alex was subpar.

      15. FDM
        Think about your question relative to his #1 overall status. $50M rookie contract, Niners QB legacy, etc … Pretty sure he didn’t live up to expectations.

      16. Rib

        You’re all Full of pisssinvinegar, but totally lacking in the self-respect necessary to formulate an argument. I welcome your rebuttal.

      17. E:

        I’ll be happy to address the substance as soon as you start supporting your opinion-presented-as-established-fact with, you know, actual facts.

      18. E, how could I ever hope to hold my own against a one-time professional football talent scout?

        Perhaps you missed my upthread response.

      19. Tarzan what 49er QB legacy are you referring to? According to you, the former Pro NFL scout, Steve Young was garbage, therefore,how do you have a legacy with only one guy?

        You need to stop changing screen names. You are getting confused with what messages you are saying. Keep it simple, stupid!

      20. CB:
        Fact: Alex Smith never had a backup he couldn’t lose his job to.

        Rib:
        Your two up thread replies were hot air. Don’t talk about Alex, that’s fine. But tell me how the Niners or Dolphins could have known what kind of talent their respective WR corps had when their respective QBs lacked the wherewithal to reliably drive the ball to downfield receivers. Simple question, but you evade it like the plague.

        You guys are a lot better when you’re talking football. Sorry I got under your skin. Steve Young is the #3 QB in the history of the Niners franchise and the #10 QB in the history of the NFL. Satisfied?

      21. >>But tell me how the Niners or Dolphins could have known what kind of talent their respective WR corps had when their respective QBs lacked the wherewithal to reliably drive the ball to downfield receivers. Simple question, but you evade it like the plague.

        Simple answer for a simple mind. With the lone exception of Brandon Lloyd, the likes of WRs
        Johny Morton, Arnaz Battle, Antonio Bryant, Michael Robinson, Jason Hill, Josh Morgan, etc. really tore up the league in their post-Niners careers, didn’t they?

        But I guess that was after *your* scouting career, so you didn’t get to properly evaluate them on their new teams.

      22. ribico:

        I apologize for interrupting when you are on a roll, but I wanted to point out that Brandon Lloyd’s last year with the 49ers was 2005, Alex Smith’s rookie year. It would be ridiculous to blame Smith for holding back Lloyd’s production as a 49er under those facts, but that doesn’t mean E won’t try.

  2. Love the honesty about “was that a serious question?” Reid was a nice choice and I look forward to his years as a 49er.

  3. Get yourself the necessary specialists combined with the latest technology, and take care of that body Mr. Reid…

  4. “You’ve got to make sure your feet are in the ground. For me, it’s not lunging at a guy. Coach Donatell likes to say you get your power from the ground. As long as you have good mechanics and your feet are on the ground and you make contact, you can deliver a blow.”

    I wish more guys in the NFL understood this. We see so many guys leaving their feet, trying for the ESPN highlight.

  5. MidWestNiner says:
    August 13, 2013 at 6:33 pm
    “I mean that he will develop into a great WR Scooter. Please don’t read anything else into it. Also compare our QBs to the Dolphins QBs that he played with. And Austin Collie will be our slot WR.”

    MidWestNiner,
    I would very much like to see M.Moore make the team, but at who’s expense?

    If the carries (let’s say) 6 WR’ who do you think they will be?

    Here’s mine:
    1. Boldin
    2. Williams
    3. Patton
    4. Yes, AJ
    5. Manningham
    6. Collie

    The three WR’s in question would be (imo) are Collie, Manningham, and AJ in a 6 WR scenario.
    I would take Collie over Moore because he has been successful when healthy.
    I absolutely take Manningham over Moore for the same reason.
    AJ will be given one more season to prove himself (whether I like that or not).

    If Moore sticks he will make the PS (if he still qualifies).

    1. I think Manningham would be the odd man out AES, especially if Moore stays healthy and he along with Williams prove to be viable deep threats options for Kaep.

      1. I thought it was pretty much a certainty that Manningham would start the season on the Reserve/PUP list. If so, he won’t count against the 53 roster limit until the 49ers activate him, which probably won’t happen until at least week 8.

      2. MidWestNiner,
        I would be ok with Moore winning over Manningham, but I still believe that team leans towards Manningham because he is a proven commodity.

        Unlike Moore, Manningham is a proven deep-threat as well.
        Collie would be the odd man out if it came down between him and Moore. Collie like Manningham, is NFL proven. The only drawback is that they both have a history of injuries.
        Keeping both may be a tough decision by the Org because of the injury risk, but if they can remain healthy they will give us a very formidable WR corps.

        I’m very interested in what the team will do with Moore, but the answer may not come until the next few weeks.

      3. It will mainly depend on how well Moore and/or Williams are doing in that role when Manningham can be activated from the Reserve/PUP list.

  6. Thanks for the heads-up on Manningham, CB.
    Moore and Collie could conceivably both make the team given Manningham’ Reserve/PUP status over 8 games.

    WR Corps for 2013 could look like this:
    Boldin
    Williams
    Patton
    AJ
    Moore
    Collie

    *If the team only carries 6 WR’s.

  7. Grant

    Here’s a former NFL player professing gospel on your boytoy Tony Romo:

    “When Tony Romo got to Dallas he had everything around him and was a loser,” Johnson said. “At one time he had five Pro Bowlers on the offensive line. They have no passing game, so nobody’s worried about the run.”

    Here is where Grant will point to statistics to prove that the Cowboys indeed DO have a passing game, forgetting the mindbogglingly feeble feats the league’s penultimate choke artiste is able to achieve under pressure.

    “Tony Romo is not that guy. He is a thief. They need to bring him up on federal charges right now. He’s killing the franchise.”

    Yeah, pretty much. Romo and his false bravado are reminiscent of Sanchez. Alex Smith is a far better QB than Romo.

    For a good article on self-doubt, cloaked in false bravado, check out this link:

    http://msn.foxsports.com/nfl/story/robert-griffin-III-mike-shanahan-kirk-cousins-washington-redskins-081213

    1. Nice article, E.

      The takeaway quote:

      “When we constantly run our mouths we oftentimes expose ourselves in unflattering ways.”

      So true in so many aspects.

    2. E
      Not to disagree with your overall greater point of Romo’s suckness, But an article disputed several of Johnson’s claims, mainly that he had 5 pro bowl OL (he actualy had 3) and that he is not a good passer (his 4900+ yds last year was 9th highest in NFL history)

      I cant find the link but i think it was a PFF article.
      While he puts up good numbers he ultimately chokes in the big moments. Its easy to slam him because much like the QB whose job he took in DAL he is good enough to give you hope for the win only to rip your heart out with a boneeaded mistake at the most inopportune time

      1. [Romo] is good enough to give you a scare only to rip your sides out in laughter with a boneheaded mistake at the most inopportune time.

        There, I fixed it for you.

      2. CB
        I was writing that thinking of Drew Bledsoe but i guess ur right in that DB takes “choking” to a level TR has yt to approach. If you expect him to fail from the begining and just waiting to see which creative way the failure will occur you are left to laugh when the prophecy fulfills itself

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