Jed York says it’s just not who he is to punish someone before he goes through an entire legal process

Jed York was interviewed at Levi’s Stadium by Murph and Mac Tuesday morning. Here’s a transcript.

MURPH: First of all, a formal, official, Murph-and-Mac, Levi’s-Stadium, KNBR-Levi’s-Stadium-studio welcome to the 49ers’ CEO who’s already having trouble with his head phones – poor Jed – Jed York, welcome to The Murph and Mac Show.

YORK: It’s like the turf, I guess. I think the same people did the microphones.

MURPH: Look at you, coming out with a little riff. So I’ll start with an easy question, then. How’s the turf?

YORK: It’s good. I think it held up really well for the soccer game. I think we’re ready. I keep getting asked the question about do you do field turf at some point? Our feeling is we like grass, we want to do everything we can to make sure that the grass is here. As you guys remember, Candlestick’s grass wasn’t always ideal. I think we got it to a point over time where the last couple of years it was probably one of the best actual fields in the NFL. And I think we can get it here. And if it doesn’t work, we’re not afraid to change it. But we certainly want to do everything that we can to make sure that we have a natural grass surface.

MAC: One more quick field condition question, because at Candlestick we know a lot of it was just the moisture seeping up from the Bay and that’s what caused it to be damp and chewed up all those years. But how about down here? What was the source of the problem where the field just couldn’t hold up for two games?

YORK: From what we’ve been able to tell it sounds like the sand composition under the field. So, having lighter sand that’s going to be less impact, but it wasn’t gripping as well. Ultimately we need to fix it and make sure that it’s set and make sure that it’s right. I think it’s holding very well and I think the field feels pretty good. But we need to make sure that it’s the best field in the NFL.

MURPH: OK, so now we’ve got to ask you about Ray McDonald and we appreciate you coming on. This is your first public interview since Ray McDonald got arrested, so I will ask you directly: Why have you waited until now to make any statements or do any interviews?

YORK: I think for me first of all, our organization speaks as one voice, so whether it’s Trent, whether it’s Jim, whether it’s me, whether it’s a statement that we put out, we speak with one voice. You can change the words that Jim spoke to you, the words that Trent – and I don’t know if he was on directly with you or just with some of the reporters. Feel free to put my name associated with any of their words that they’ve said. And we’ve had conversations internally. I’ve had conversations with both my wife and my mother about where we are and what we do. And I think it’s very important that we do let due process take its course. I think it’s very important that we don’t judge somebody before whether chargers are filed or whether anything else happens. We want to make sure everyone is afforded the right that I think Americans are afforded.

MURPH: Going to circle back to the question again and say I understand that Jim speaks for you and so does Trent, but I guess some people were looking for, quote, the word “leadership” from the front, front, front office. Jim Harbaugh’s the coach of the team whereas you’re the CEO of the team. If you could do it over again would you be speaking earlier on this to take more leadership on it?

YORK: I think we took leadership as a group and as an organization. I mean it was all of us. Again, whether it was me saying it, whether it was Jim, whether it was Trent, we’re all on the same page so we’re having those conversations, we’re making sure we’re in lockstep. I don’t think you’re going to see me say anything different than what those guys have said.

MURPH: Is it fair to make them speak for you? In some ways I thought it was unfair to put Jim in the crosshairs when you could have come out and just done it.

YORK: I mean, you can feel that. Jim speaks on football matter and football operations. That’s what his, one of his responsibilities is. I mean if you feel like I should have come out, that’s certainly fair for you to feel that. I mean I’m here today and I don’t think it would have changed anything that we’ve done.

MURPH: And thank you for being here.

MAC: So that being said, Jed, not changing anything that’s been done so far and having one unanimous voice represent yourself and the coach and Trent, explain a little bit what led to the decision that Ray McDonald was on the field in Dallas. We’ve been talking about it. A lot of people have been asking about it. What was behind that decision?

YORK: I mean, I know you’re a UCLA guy, and I like quotes. John Wooden talks about character and reputation. And I believe very strongly in that quote that you should care more about your character than your reputation. I’m comfortable if my reputation is going to take shots throughout this process, but my character is I will not punish somebody until we see evidence that it should be done, or before an entire organization and an entire legal police investigation shows us something. And again, if you sit him down or not, whether he’s guilty or not, we’ve said very clearly what our stance is on domestic violence. We’re not changing that and I want to reiterate everything that Jim and Trent have said and what the organization has said. And again, I would much rather walk the line of due process, and I think, again, we’ve said very clearly how we feel about domestic violence, and I would much rather take shots to my reputation, than to put somebody down and to judge them before an entire investigation has taken place.

MURPH: Jed York is the voice you hear, CEO of the 49ers, first public interview since the Ray McDonald arrest and, of course, he’s here mainly to talk about opening night on Sunday and we will. We have Jed for two segments. He’s kind enough to stay for two segments. But in fairness we talked to him earlier, we said we want to ask these questions that a lot of fans want to ask and a lot of listeners and a lot of reporters want to ask, and Jed has graciously agreed to take them on here. So, two extremely prominent figures in your franchise’s history, guys who are in this museum in statue form, Ronnie Lott and Steve Young, have both come out and said you guys should not have played Ray McDonald. Steve Young came through with an argument that I endorsed earlier in the week, which is I understand Ray McDonald might be exonerated, he may not even be charged, but it was my opinion that you guys had reached a boiling point with your team image and your team’s number of arrests. That maybe it was time to take a strong stand to send a message to your fan base and to your locker room that, don’t put yourself in these situations. Don’t be in a situation where we have to even talk about this. And as Steve Young said on Monday Night Football last night, if we have to sit you and pay you, so be it. This is the time to take a stand. How do you answer that argument?

YORK: I mean I think it’s a fair argument. And again, I think I’ve said it clearly, until we can go through an entire process and understand all of the facts and let that play out – again, I would much rather have somebody criticize me for doing that than punishing somebody that might be innocent and put them in a position where we’re presuming guilt before you’ve given them an opportunity to prove their innocence.

MURPH: But if you couched it by saying – sorry to interrupt you – if you couched it by saying we’re not saying you’re guilty, but we are saying it’s time for the 49ers to behave in a certain way and not – because you guys want entertainment dollars. You guys are a business. You want to fill the seats and sell the tickets and have fun. And there are people, you know there are people out there that are turning off of the 49ers because of the quote unquote image. And like you said, it might not be real, but it’s an image. Sometimes is it maybe important to protect that image?

YORK: You know, I think, again, I think as a leader you need to make sure that you’re doing what you feel is the right thing. And it’s not always what’s the most popular thing. And again, I will fall back on if you want to take shots at my reputation and you want to characterize me in this way for taking this stance, I’m comfortable with that. And I realize there might be people that dissent. And I fully acknowledge that and I fully respect that decision, but for me, to look at myself in the mirror and say I’m going to punish somebody, whether it’s not playing them or cutting them or suspending them or whatever that punishment is, before you can go through an entire legal process, an entire investigation, that’s just, that’s not who I am.

This article has 149 Comments

  1. not sure who all this hoopla helps…..

    Ray is out of a job…..
    The wife has repeated she is not a victim –
    The NFL will have another story in a month where a player assaults, do drugs or DUI…….
    ESPN/media will keep showing this story which will enable another assault situation….

    And the country is full of racists and wife beaters…..

    so what is the freaking point?

    1. Panthers Pro Bowl defensive end Greg Hardy was found guilty of assaulting a female and communicating threats…….

      Carolina Panthers defensive end Greg Hardy said he hasn’t heard from the NFL since he was convicted of domestic violence in July.

      its true Roger Goodell Is An ‘Enabler Of Men Who Beat Women’

    2. I wasn’t aware until this morning on the Radnich program that our own Chris Cook, while with the Vikings choked his wife/girlfriend/fiancé to the point the vessels in her eyes popped, this according to a former punter with the team. So, there is no “freaking point.” It’s the “49ers way.” Right, Jed?

      1. Any company of any size has multiple felons employed, in fact the NFL has a slightly lower average of felons than the rest of society.

        1. Bray i’ve worked in education for close to 30 years so i hate to admit this but there are more teachers [proportionally] arrested for felonies each year than pro athletes.

      1. Murp and Mac are lightweights but Murp interview with Jed was classic, tough questions, the only thing Mac can do is talk about the Greatfull Dead.

    1. If they stay healthy than we’re all good. For the most part we only use 2 backs, sometimes a 3rd bigger back for short yardage and goal line, but Hyde seems to fit the mold of an all-purpose back, much like Gore, but gigantic.

      I’m also little worried that this might take away a dimension to our running game that we had with Hunter, and presumably James. I think bringing back a speedster like Alfonso might help, but I doubt he brings the same element Hunter brought. This really makes me miss Hunter, could have been a great trio.

      I wonder if the nonchalant approach of adding a 3rd RB is an indicator of a shift of an offensive philosophy towards more passing. I think I’m looking to much into this.

      1. Maybe the nonchalant approach means Lattimore might actually suit up. (not counting on it)

        BTW… Boobie Dixon ripped off a nice run Sunday.

        1. Yes I thought about that too, so there just hoping they stay healthy at least until week 6 possibly.

          I wouldn’t mind that trio either.

      2. The 49ers ran Gore three consecutive plays to run out the clock. Its probably because of his good ball security and instincts.

        Someone speculated the 49ers were saving Hyde’s legs by running Gore. They want Hyde fresh for the end of the season. A reversal of conventional thinking.

    2. B2W, as they say, hindsight is 20/20. I think they kept James because he knew the playbook better than Winston and neither Hyde nor Ellington had ever proven themselves in an NFL season game. Furthermore, cutting LMJ when they did without having another RB to plug in, was uncharacteristic. That together with Harbaugh’s lukewarm reference to James in the press conference I take as meaning they cut him because, all of a sudden, he had become a cancer. It’s unfortunate, but I think if they had to do it all over again, they would. And maybe they are working on obtaining another running back you will like better than Winston.

      1. There were many on this blog clamoring to replace LMJ with Winston before cut down day. Not saying they are right. (I thought Glen Coffee would have a great career after his sterling preseason.)

        After promotion to a management position, an old timer told me “most of the time employees fire themselves. You just do the paperwork.” It’s very possible LMJ talked his way out of a job.

        1. I was one of those who thought that Winston was a better fit as a runner, having both power and speed, and have long thought that James was a wasted roster spot.

          1. I believe I was the first on here to say it would be a mistake to keep James over Winston, and the common response were the comparison’s to pre-season warriors destined for the scrap heap…..

            1. Razor i may may not have commented here but i told all my fellow 9er fans at work that i thought Winston could be a star and LMJ goes down when he is touched by a finger.

              1. You, like Brotha(although he was one of the culprit’s, tee hee) are voices of reason in here, so I believe you. Jack Hammer opined that Winston was a dime a dozen back. I have to say he had it backwards…..

              2. Perhaps we should wait until Winston is on a game day roster and carries the ball in an actual NFL before we designate him for Canton.

              3. Depends on Ben Tate’s injury. If he is held out, then they probably would activate Winston as the third RB. Otherwise, I doubt it. The three Cleveland RBs who dressed against Pittsburgh on Sunday each averaged more than 6 yards/carry. Why would they pull anyone to play Winston?

                You might want to try the Browns site on sbnation.com. They may have some info on Winston and his chances of playing.

                That said,

            2. Razoreater

              ‘Like the mayonaise ad “..so whattya’ want, A parade?” At this point after a personnel decision, the “I told you so’s” usually come out in droves. Let’s see just what the season brings …If LaMichael James blows the doors off the league for another team like he was never going to with a team as inflexible as the fortyniners. I don’t know if it’s Greg Roman or Jim Harbaugh, but I think that there’s a reason that Bo Schembechler was never a HC in the NFL.

            3. I was the 28th person to suggest Winston over Gore.

              Seriously, I’ve been comparing Hyde’s 3 negative yardage plays in 183 carries to LMJ’s Frequent Fumbler Miles since May.

              I’ve been swatting away Hunter = LMJ comparisons for over a year. There is no comparison (when Hunter is healthy).

              All moot now. Winston was a preseason star… which sometimes means something, and sometimes means nothing. Lets hope Lattimore is “laying in the weeds, sharpening his knives.”

              1. Dr. Lattimore believes he’s ready. It’s the 49ers stones that have determined he’s not yet sharp enough….

              2. Could not agree more. Hyde was a threat in both the pro set and option in college. He’s a natural receiver too (like Lattimore).

                Kaepernick + Hyde = confused defenses.

        2. If Winston takes the league by storm I’ll be happy to come on here and eat some crow over my assertion that he is another in a long list of RB’s to have success against scrubs late in a preseason game. Before that can happen he has to get off the inactive list…

  2. Three entries in a row about Ray McDonald and not even a mention of Frank Gore passing 10k yards? You’re ruining this blog Cohn. Let me tell you something, this blog is about the 9er fans who post here. You are a byproduct. I’ve been reading and posting here since before you had your first date and I’m ready to go to SFGate or Niners Nation for my 9er news and interaction with fans. You drive enough of us away and you’ll be out of a job no matter who your Daddy is so I suggest you shape up or move on.

      1. Can’t say it’s not enlightening that the comments on this article are concerning the RB situation and not that of McDonald. Surely we can’t all be tired of hearing about this non-stop?

    1. Man I am ready for us to talk football and just stop speculating on all of this till the police tell us something. Its a shame that Grant hasn’t done a piece on Gore reaching 10,000yds or most others for that fact and that we are still talking about RM. Let hear injury updates, practice updates, something else as well.

  3. What if the Kaep incident happened during the season?. Should he have sat on the bench for 2 months before the Miami police finally cleared him of wrong doing? Or what about the Crabtree incident two years ago?

    1. No charges were ever filed, nobody was ever arrested, and there was no evidence of wrongdoing on the part of the players in those situations.

      Personally I think the NFL should consider “suspension pending investigation” whenever an athlete is arrested – typically an arrest is not made unless the DA or officers involved feel there is enough evidence against them to warrant it.

      Why is it that they can fail a drug test and be suspended immediately, but if they blow .24 in a breathalyzer after being pulled over for a DUI they wait for due process. Isn’t that essentially failing a drug test?

      1. Ninergirl good point regarding drugs and D.U.I.’s but in the case of domestic violence if an officer responds to a call there will more than likely be an arrest, then an investigation.

      2. Hope this is a good example for you. The reason that we have due process is to look at all the details to formulate as accurate a decision as possible.

        Your breathalyzer example is a good one. Guess what, equipment fails. They need to go in and check if it’s calibrated correctly, when was the equipment last calibrated. Had that particular machine failed previously in the field.

        Two weeks ago I went and had my blood pressure taken prior to knee surgery. The reading I got was 156/110. The doctor came in very concerned. Wanted to cancel my surgery and started the process of putting me in contact with a heart doctor. I stopped everyone and asked for them to take my blood pressure with a different machine. They did. I got 128/89. Technology fails folks. Bad example maybe but I just wanted to demonstrate that.

        Due process. Respect how our country, our constitution and our laws work.

        1. True, technology fails. But the same can be said for the NFL drug testing equipment and they don’t wait for due process, re-calibrations, retests, etc. in those cases. Suspension is immediate. Why differentiate with a breathalyzer test?

          1. And secondly about the drug testing. They’re athletes and in their job drugs can give a competitive edge. There’s millions on the table for players. And cheating is obviously not tolerated. Alchohol and off the field issues are a seperate issue in themselves. They don’t screw up the competitive balance on the field.

            1. Recreational Drugs and PED’s should be seen as totally separate things.

              Time to subtract THC tests and add HGH tests.

            2. True – but one of the biggest competitive advantages is HGH. They aren’t testing for that because 80-90% of the players would be suspended….and they both know it and tolerate it.

              1. 49ergirl from what i’m reading and hearing that may change very soon. The owners are ready to ease up on rec drugs for HGH testing and its rumored that the players association is ready to deal. The players understand that players size and speed are directly related to concussions and they are serious about concussions.

              2. As a long time cycling fan I know in-house PED testing never works. The UCI’s been falling on its face for 20 years.

                If the NFL hires WADA or USADA then I’ll know they are serious. Any internal NFL testing is bound to be poorly executed (at best).

          2. On the drug testing the suspensions are NEVER immediate. The players are able to play until all appeals are fully excercised unless the player accepts it. Remember- richard sherman got a dirty test and never stopped playing. He was let off on a technicality.

            What is new is the idea of punishing somone immediately without facts or appeals. That is why ray mcdonald is such an awkward case- the press wants the niners to do something unprecendented to prove how tough they are on domestic violence.

      3. 49er girl… drug tests are cut and dry and are ‘testing’. Whereas an investigation with many different people needs to happen before ‘facts’ are outlined in a domestic abuse case. It’s not even close to cut and dry, especially with multiple witnesses.

        It takes 30 seconds to tell if someone failed a drug test.

      4. The only problem with that opinion is you would or could have a lot of people making false accusations on certain players. They could become targets of exploitation where people want money from them. So then, the police are called on an accusation, arrested with no formal charges and the player now has to sit, suspended and wait til possibly the false charges or accusations are acquitted.

        Unless its murder, homicide, due process seems to work. Just my opinion.

      5. “Why is it that they can fail a drug test and be suspended immediately, but if they blow .24 in a breathalyzer after being pulled over for a DUI they wait for due process. Isn’t that essentially failing a drug test?”

        The NFL’s substance abuse policy treats alcohol involved issues differently from PED’s or illicit dugs. The separation is not uncommon, either at law or under employment agreements. While alcohol is clearly pharmacologically a drug, it is often neither legislated nor perceived as such.

        Under the NFL’s policy, alcohol use is only an issue if an alcohol involved criminal offense is committed. Conversely, illicit drugs and PEDs are specifically prohibited. As alcohol consumption is in and of itself not a grounds for league intervention under the policy, then the league will “generally” wait for the outcome of a criminal proceeding for alcohol involved offenses prior to intervention.

        There is another issue as well, one to do with the source of testing. The NFL suspends players for positive tests for PEDs and illicit drugs pursuant to test administered by or at the behest of the NFL. These tests follow the procedures prescribed in the policy. Roadside BAC tests are not administered in accordance with these procedures. Further, roadside equipment, while better than it once was, pales in comparison to the accuracy of laboratory testing. The incidence of improper/inaccurate police BAC testing, even blood testing, is also much higher than such incidence with drug testing labs. Thus, suspensions based on BAC at time of arrest would rely on testing that is not done in accordance with agreed policy and which has a lower surety of accuracy than drug lab testing.

        If the NFLPA would agree to BAC testing standards below those used for other drugs, and would agree that consumption of a legal substance is proper grounds for league intervention if such consumption is coincident with suspicion of illegal activity related to said consumption, than maybe we will see BAC treated the same as a failed drug test. However, I do not foresee the NFLPA agreeing to anything like this.Interestingly, reports are that the NFLPA might agree to a mandatory suspension upon conviction of an alcohol related DWI, but this is a far cry from treating BAC as a drug test.

        With respect to the idea of “suspension pending investigation,” it should be noted that neither the NFL’s Personal Conduct Policy nor Substance Abuse Policy require the commissioner wait for legal determination of wrongdoing. This will “generally” be the case in first offenses, but the Personal Conduct Policy makes it clear that the NFL’s investigation is the source of rationale for league intervention, not the criminal proceedings, and that in exceptional instances and for second and subsequent violations, the commissioner can take action prior to the conclusion of criminal proceedings.

        So, the commissioner could establish an “suspension pending investigation” policy consistent with the Personal Conduct Policy for players who had previously violated the conduct policy. It would be more difficult for first offenses to the policy, as the term “generally”, which allows the discretion to not wait for criminal proceedings to conclude in exceptional cases, also restricts the unilateral enactment of a policy of “suspension pending investigation” for first offenses to the conduct policy as the plain language of the document states this will not be the general practice. The NFLPA would have to agree to this as a modification of the controlling document (NFL Personal Conduct Policy), and as with BAC being treated as a drug test, I do not foresee the NFLPA agreeing to such.

        Finally, although I think a “suspension pending investigation” policy might be valuable, with regard to criminal matters I have concern with your comment that “typically an arrest is not made unless the DA or officers involved feel there is enough evidence against them to warrant it.” Arrests are made on probable cause. Probable cause for an arrest warrant is determined by a judge (but the evidentiary threshold is much lower than for arraignment); probable cause for a warrantless arrest is determined by the officers on the scene, and the decision may also include issues such as flight risk, victim safety, community safety, and even suspect safety. In either the case of an arrest warrant or a warrantless arrest, probable cause merely means there is a reasonable basis for believing that a crime may have been committed, not that substantial evidence for that crime exists.

        I would be more comfortable with a policy that stated that a defendant being indicted or bound over for trial would result in a “suspension pending investigation” than I would a policy that based suspension on merely an arrest. If an indictment is issued or a case is bound over for trial, then a person (judge) or body (grand jury) has reviewed the evidence and found that the evidence presented is sufficient to warrant moving beyond probable cause and on to a trial.

        1. JPN:

          Thanks for the well-written tour through the byzantine details of player discipline under the CBA. You summed it up very well.

          Fwiw, I think you are absolutely right when you say that a “suspension pending investigation” should not arise merely for an arrest, but should wait at least until a judge or grand jury has reviewed the evidence and deemed it sufficient enough to warrant a trial.

          1. I agree – that is a better solution than jumping the gun and/or waiting for a trial that will never take place in the era of “settled out of court/no contest plea”.

        2. I would be more comfortable with a policy that stated that a defendant being indicted or bound over for trial would result in a “suspension pending investigation” than I would a policy that based suspension on merely an arrest. If an indictment is issued or a case is bound over for trial, then a person (judge) or body (grand jury) has reviewed the evidence and found that the evidence presented is sufficient to warrant moving beyond probable cause and on to a trial.

          Perfectly said JPN and it echos the concerns I have over disciplining the player before indictment. If charges are issued, we can talk about the team needing to take some form of action. Until then, due process needs to be adhered to.

      6. “Personally I think the NFL should consider “suspension pending investigation” whenever an athlete is arrested”

        I would agree. Problem is I don’t think the NFLPA would.

        1. Jack,

          Take a case such as McD’s, where the player hasn’t been charged yet. What if the investigation gets strung out four or five weeks? Are you suggesting that the player involved sit that entire time?

          And what if the DA’s office and / or police take their sweet time to come out with a statement that the arrested player is no longer a subject of an investigation?

          I realize this scenario wouldn’t be the norm, but do you see how unfair being “suspended pending investigation” could be to a player?

          Add in the practical issue that you would likely never have the full trust of the player, or many of his teammates again, and it becomes a no brainer.

          There will be plenty of time to come down on McD like a ton of bricks, when, and if, he’s found guilty.

          Just because it itches, doesn’t mean it should be scratched.

            1. Jack,

              I read your comment as you agreeing that “suspension pending investigation” was a good idea, and only then raising the doubt that the NFLPA would go for it, as a secondary thought.

              My mistake…

      7. Alchohol is legal
        Drugs are not. If Mary Jane ever gets legalized you’d have the same problem if there was a machine made to take thc levels at the time of arrest. In the eyes of the law machines can fail.

          1. If it’s not federally legal it isn’t legal. No way big corps like the nfl make that move unless the crooks in Washington tell them they can

      8. i believe in the case of domestic violence, one of the party *must* go with the police, and they are usually let off on bail, pending further investigation.

  4. Houston I agree with your comment and assessment. All Grant does is re-post something written by others and tries to stir things up. He has no knowledge of the game and is a smarmy little no nothing. At least the other blogs writers will try to do their best to be a journalist and report the facts without re-posting 49ers.com. Sadly though, our press corp is very weak in the Bay Area and you wonder why they never get a scoop on anything.

    Look at his Dad starting the after game press conference with the question on whether Coach H has lost the locker room. The team had just won a game that not everyone was sure about and LC starts with a stupid question. They are not journalists … they’re hacks.

    1. Did you ever stop to think that Lowell and Jim might know each other better than you think and that was a softball for the coach that Lowell asked as a favor? Things are not always as they appear…

      1. “Did you ever stop to think that Lowell and Jim might know each other better than you think and that was a softball for the coach that Lowell asked as a favor?”

        Seriously? That’s not a real question, right? Do you really think Harbaugh is intimate on any level with Lowel Cohn or any other member of the Harbaugh Hater Posse comprised of the Cohn’s, Ann Killian, Tim Kamakawi, Ray Ratto and the rest of the sanctimonious, soap box preaching, holier than thou crowd?

      2. Actually no I did not. Having listened to Coach Harbaugh’s mantra it’s the team and it should have been recognizing a great win, Frank Gore’s super milestone of 10K yards and proving the naysayers wrong. I watch football to watch a game I happen to enjoy and am supportive of the team. I enjoy listening to the post game interviews of players and coaches to see the raw emotions good or bad because it is about the game. My issue with a lot of the press (local and national)is they all believe it had to be tabloid or TMZ like journalism. Give us all a chance to enjoy the win or sulk about the loss.I maybe old school but I believe the outcome of the game was a pretty good indicator he had not lost the locker room. Ask Singletary, Nolan and Erickson about losing locker rooms.

        I lived in the same development as Erickson when he was HC of the Niners and I can tell you on Friday nights prior to a home game the only thing he was all into was adult refreshments… not the game. So I am very happy we have a very good coach and staff today who seems to be all in.

        1. Why does that bit about Erickson partying on Friday nights not surprise me? Worst coach in recent Niner history…and that includes Singletary, lol!

          I hope they get the contract worked out with Harbaugh sooner than later. Love him or hate him, he’s been effective and our team’s been winning, and it’s been a really long time since we’ve had a HC who did that consistently.

          1. Agree with your comment.One Friday night before Erickson had so many adult refreshments he couldn’t remember where he parked his Escalade (not a big parking lot BTW) nor what color the vehicle was. thankfully there was only one Escalade in the lot :-)

  5. I’m glad York is finally on the record. How sad is it that the Harbaugh brothers have to do their respective team’s management/ownership’s PR dirty work?

    1. I agree Rib. Even if he’s saying exactly the same thing as Harbaugh and Baalke I would rather hear it from him first. That would take the heat off those two which to me is a sign of leadership.

      Jed’s not there yet.

      1. Speaking of which, how about the Ravens putting it all on the shoulders of John Harbaugh yesterday? JH handled himself nicely, but the ownership and FO embarrassed themselves, IMO.

  6. Houston I understand your frustration. I usually go to Matt maiocco for 49er news and here to read the comments from the fans. I think the fans make this site worth coming back to. I’d hate to see anyone leave because of the tone of the posts. The real value is in the comments that are self moderated and take their own direction regardless of the headline.

  7. Guys don’t like the blog, don’t let the door hit you ont he way out. Come back when there’s another guy at the top.

    Meanwhile, I am more than happy to let Jed play with his marbles instead of inserting himself into the conversation. You want Jerry Jones??? Please…

    And as much $$$$$$$$$$ as the bro’s get paid, they can speak for the organization all they want. Plus I really enjoy Jim’s responses to the many dumb bunnies in the press corp. Refeshing to not hear that smarmy Bee-Ess that most coaches bloviate…

    1. >>And as much $$$$$$$$$$ as the bro’s get paid, they can speak for the organization all they want.

      A spit in the bucket compared to the owner’s take from the operation. This is a management issue and should be addressed from the very top.

  8. Kudos to Mr York. In America, everyone has the right to trial by an impartial jury. Everything else is PR. PR matters…but it’s always good to start with the the basics…like the Constitution.
    Left to their own devices, the mob would devour many of us and regret it later.

  9. Where’s Ralph Barbiari when you need him? (lol).
    Actually I thought that Murph did a good job with by not suger-coating his questions.

    I still don’t get where (even Jed York) the team feels that sitting McDonald is perceived as a conviction or punishment. My thoughts are that DUE PROCESS can be undertaken while a player (especially in the case) is benched while awaiting final results.
    Where are his constitutional rights being violated if he remains on the team payroll?

    1. AES,

      What about the damage done to the team by alienating the player and at least some of his teammates? That is damage that would never be fully undone.

      1. exgolfer,
        I fully understand the effects it may have on teammates if Mac is benched, but at the same time we have to be cognizant that this whole issue has likely already effected the team.

        It’s too late for the team to change their current stance on letting Mac play. But they should create a policy going forward that any player arrested would be put on administrative leave until all facts are presented.

        Sure, some teammates are going to be content or discontent on the orgs decisions on these matters, but if there is a core set of standards in place they will know in advance what the repercussions are if they are arrested due to bad choices.

        1. AES,

          I get what you’re going for and if it was attainable with a blanket edict, I’d go along with you.

          The problem is, you’re eventually sweep up a player that is innocent of anything serious enough to warrant a suspension. If a player feels wrongly accused and, at a minimum, you’ve lost that player (at least to a degree).

          Let’s say that Kaepernick had his Miami issue during the bye week, except this time the girl accused him of rape. As he was in Miami, he’s innocent in this case, but he needs lab testing and other forensics to clear him, which ultimately happens, only nine weeks later, which happens to be two weeks into the playoffs.

          Now, how do you think Kaepernick, not to mention the rest of the team is going to feel about him being suspended pending investigation?

          Forget about how the players would feel, if the fan base ever found out you were behind the auto-suspension-when-arrested edict you’d need to move to Seattle (of course, there you’d be a hero, sort of like Snowden in Russia. Of course, like Russia, what’s the point of being a hero in Seattle?).

          1. exgolfer,
            I’m not looking to be a hero in any venue except in my home.

            It seems that the majority of the off field issues confronting the 49ers have generally taken place during the off season.
            If the Org can enact a more clear and firm set of conditions for the team with clear repercussions, my hope would be that players could feel less compelled to commit poor choices.

            In the case of McDonald, I’ve said from the beginning that the most damning report is that made by the SJPD. Not the players who were at the party or even his fiancée for that matter. But the police dept.

            Kap’ case was completely different because there was no evidence of wrong doing…

            “No charges, no indication that a criminal act was committed,” Ed Griffith of the State Attorney’s said, according to CSNBayArea.com. “She was alleging that she may have been the victim of a sexual assault, and there was no evidence.”

            “The women involved in this incident also had a previous record of mental issues…
            Greater details were revealed about the incident Thursday in the closeout memo. Prichette, from Atlanta, was admitted to the hospital under the Baker Act for mental illness. Police said at the scene she was screaming incoherntly and was hearing voices. She had to be sedated and strapped to a stretcher. She and Kaepernick had met a year earlier and had sex, but he cut off communication with her when she said she was pregnanat, both the police and Kaepernick’s attorney confirmed.

            There was never an arrest made in the case, either.” ~ Sporting News

            1. AES:

              In the case of McDonald, I’ve said from the beginning that the most damning report is that made by the SJPD.

              Are you talking about the synopsis? I don’t think it contained the information you think it contained. All it said was that the police received a call, that McDonald’s fiancee has bruises visible on her neck and arm, and that McDonald was arrested. It doesn’t conclude that McDonald struck his fiancee or otherwise caused the bruises; it doesn’t state that the bruises were caused that evening; it doesn’t explain the circumstances that led to the bruising. It contains no allegations from his fiancee or any other witness testimony.

              I’m not sure what you consider “damning” about the synopsis or why you think it is evidence that McDonald made a poor choice.

              1. CB,
                I used the term “damning” in that it has been the strongest report (SJD) regarding the McDonald incident to this point. It seems (at least I have not heard of such) that there were no witnesses of the incident by the attendees.

                No, the bruises on her arm and neck does not represent conclusive proof that it came from McDonald.
                But there in lays the controversy imo. There are to many unanswered questions. One question that I would be interested in is; Who called the police to report the incident?

                If no one at the party was privy to the incident it seems to leave either the fiancée or McDonald himself that made the call.
                Until all the evidence has been submitted I would sit RayMac.

              2. I wonder how many of these “don’t bench McDonald” defenders would be using the same argument if it had been Richard Sherman who had been accused and accused for putting bruises on his fiance’s nick and arms.

                Come on guys. Unless someone else wanted to risk getting killed by McDonald for bruising his pregnant woman, it’s pretty certain he was too rough with her and marked her up.

                He should sit if the 49er organization is serious about domestic violence. York has already said it’s just lip service so I guess he’ll play.

                Women everywhere should applaud this “profile in courage”.

              3. As far as I’m concerned, Sherman and every other Seahawk should be benched for infractions no more serious than excessive cursing or driving an Escalade.

                Yeah, I’m a hypocrite. That’s what you are getting at, right?

            2. AES,

              I didn’t say you were trying to be a hero, I was merely making a joke, sorry if you misinterpreted that.

              I’m fully aware of the final outcome of the CK’s actual case in Miami. I was using that as a jumping off point for a separate, and hypothetical case, one in which CK was actually accused of something. I left it to inference that CK was arrested (not clear on my part, sorry).

              My point was that what if a key player is the subject of an ongoing investigation, or is wrongly charged and awaiting trial (don’t think that out of market DA’s wouldn’t try to make political hay on the back of an athlete), and it takes some amount of time for an innocent player to be exonerated? You think it would be fair to the player, the team and the fans to suspend the player until exonerated? I don’t, not unless the evidence was pretty clear, and that’s why I think this kind of thing needs to be handled on a case by case basis.

              Also, do I have it right that you’re supporting your idea of blanket suspensions with the claim that most issues are in the off season? You mean like Ray McDonald’s case?

              1. No I don’t support a blanket suspension and in fact I have not used the word suspension regarding Ray McDonald. I said the team should create something tantamount to an administrative leave. In this scenario, a player(s) constitutional rights are not violated because he is still a paid member of the team.

                Yes, I agree with you that each case should be treated on its on merit, that was my intention in presenting the Kaep incident.
                But in the McDonald case there were definite marks of bruising on his fiancee’ arm and neck. Whether they were put there by Mac or not, is the reason I would sit him. A DV case is too volatile/sensitive to allow a player to continue to play while too many questions remain unanswered.

              2. AES,

                Here’s what you wrote above:

                “It’s too late for the team to change their current stance on letting Mac play. But they should create a policy going forward that any player arrested would be put on administrative leave until all facts are presented.”

                Perhaps I paid to much attention to the last sentence, but the phrase “…any player arrested would be put on administrative leave…” sure sounds like you’re talking about all players arrested, and, by definition, that’s a blanket solution.

                If I misinterpreted your meaning when you wrote “…any player arrested…”, my apologies.

  10. Grant you have received alot of criticism around here for running a Hollywood rumour blog instead of a football blog. I’ve stayed away from those criticisms for the most part but please start writing about on field issues again. I really did’nt follow the bears game sunday or its aftermath. Please catch me up on our next opponent. I have been a follower of this blog for about 5 or 6 years, i really enjoy the give and take between all of your regular readers, hell i even enjoyed DS most of the time. I believe its time to put away the moralizing and move back to football. The last thing i want to do is leave this site for MM or MB so i’m pleading with you tell me about Da bears.

    1. It should be a similar game plan to that of Dallas, however the Bears don’t have three 1st Round draft picks on their offensive line. It will not be as formidable. I’d like to think Fangio will try rotating Borland in running situations. To me Wilhoite struggled against the run, and Borland has better instincts there. I don’t expect Brock to start for at least two weeks, and it may be a situation similar to when Culliver came in for him and he never got back in the starting line up. Cox has earned a starting role in my opinion. The Bears offense runs through Forte, so Ian Williams needs to play better, along with Brooks setting the edge, against the run. Defensively the Bears are more growl than bite, and the 49ers should have their way with them. Btw, did you see the way Iupati paved the way for Gore, when they needed to run the ball late to put some salt on it? Impressive…..

      1. If Brock can’t go I think Cook may go from inactive to starter. Cox and Johnson got the nod to suit up over Cook because they offer versatility and STs presence. But I think in terms of starting outside CB, Cook would be ahead of those guys. Just my opinion though, not supported by anything.

        1. Scooter,
          I like Cook because of his height. The Bears have Marshall and Jeffreys who make up a tall WR tandem. I believe we may see Dontea Johnson in the mix as well, but not as a starter.

        2. Ward should be good to go it would appear. That means Cox will start outside for Brock. Johnson would be next with Cook as the final backup . Fangio described Cox as the utility club in the golf bag, and said he can play safety. Which begs the question, how long before Dahl is released?

    2. They also have in their possession, a ball hawk in Jennings on the back end of their defense, so Kaepernick will need to be cognizant of his whereabouts….

      1. They’re ranked 18th, so “terrible” might be considered an exaggeration. Gore should have a big day, and in turn, the entire offense….

      2. They’re ranked 18th, so “terrible” might be considered an exaggeration. Gore should have a big day, and in turn, the entire offense….

              1. Hey Kaep! How can you not complete 80% of your passes against that sorry Dallas secondary? YOU STINK!

                That better?

  11. message for Jed York: … you can
    stand on your head or
    paint yourself green…
    you can play Ray mcDonald or
    Tom, Dick or Harry…
    Do whatever you want, just know this:
    if you & Coach Harbaw fail to bring home
    Lombardi trophy #6, then you suck eggs.

  12. The Bears have two starting offensive linemen that went down this week with high ankle sprains. Also Alshon Jeffries tweaked a hammy this week as well.

    Bears not in good shape.

    1. Plus Brandon Marshall is “working through something as well” BTW did you see Marshall on Inside the NFL? Very good in front of the camera with great insight and comments. I thought he and Ed Reed were pretty good when Simms would finally let them speak

      1. I agree Al. I saw the same. Look like they wanted to hit each other at the end for a minute. Lol didn’t know he was that tall or reed was that short.

  13. I suppose that tomorrow we hear if anyone claimed LMJ today. If there were no suitors, there’s always the possibility he comes back to us, that is, if they didn’t cut him because of the Rapaport story. I ask myself why they haven’t signed anyone yet. Maybe that’s the reason.

      1. I wonder if his attitude is a big part of why he failed. The right attitude is to come in as a rookie, no matter what you did in college, and say you want to do whatever the coaches ask you to in order to help the team win. His attitude always seemed more like he was being held back by the coaching staff, as if he could be a big star on a different team. I guess a lot of success in college can lead to that thinking. But his backstabbing the coaching staff in his twitter comments and in probable leaks to the media about “dissension” in the locker room seem to have made him radioactive. That attitude can fly if you are a huge talent. If you are a marginal talent, good luck.

    1. I think the reasoning George is, Ellington can run everything James did. Outside running plays, slot receiver, return duties. So now the question becomes, Dr. Lattimore. Can he convince the 49ers in practice that he’s ready? My belief, is yes and he will get his shot sometime after the bye…..

      1. I certainly hope that works out, but they are not the type of organization that goes without the extra insurance of a third RB, are they? I don’t think so, which is why I think they will sign someone before this weekend, unless they promote Gaskins. Btw, a month or so ago, someone, I think it was AFNP, suggested they groom Okoye for the role. He thought it would be great to see them plan runs for him against Sherman when we play the SS.

  14. Never thought I say… I miss the days of the Alex smith saga. Uhhggg.
    Can we PLEASE talk some football?
    Hyde?
    Ck?
    Boone?
    Iupoti?
    Gore?
    S Johnson and Lloyd?
    Game plans?
    New stadium opener?
    Please FOR THE LOVE OF GOD!!!
    (C Farley voice)

    1. MD,

      OK, let’s talk about the guys you listed.

      Do you think those guys you listed should be suspended if they get arrested? Why, or why not?

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