2015 NFL draft quarterback comparisons

This is what I see when I watch the top quarterbacks in this year’s draft class.

Marcus Mariota: Alex Smith.

Why: Smart quarterbacks who dominated college football and don’t make many mistakes. Practically the same size – 6-4, 218 pounds. Fast runners, although Mariota is faster. Good passers, although neither has a cannon and neither has pin-point placement. Neither had to throw into tight windows, neither had to anticipate openings in coverage and neither faced much pressure. Both played in spread offenses for teams that were much better than the opposition most of the time.

Smith was the top pick in the draft, but he needed a few seasons to adjust to the speed of the league and to get used to playing for a team that was much worse than the opposition most of the time. The same might be true for Mariota.

Jameis Winston: Jay Cutler.

Why: Big, mobile, pro-style, strong-armed quarterbacks who get picked off a lot. Winston threw 18 picks in 13 games this past season, and his interception rate at Florida State was 3.3%. Cutler’s career interception rate in the NFL is 3.4%. Both quarterbacks force passes and neither is particularly accurate.

Brett Hundley: Donovan McNabb.

Why: Powerful, fast, elusive, instinctual runners – like running backs. Strong arms. Quick releases. Inaccurate downfield passers. Practically identical college careers – McNabb threw 77 touchdowns, 26 interceptions, and ran for 19 touchdowns at Syracuse; Hundley threw 75 touchdowns, 25 picks, and ran for 30 touchdowns at UCLA.

Bryce Petty: Blake Bortles.

Why: Strong pocket passers who can run – Bortles scored 15 rushing touchdowns in college; Petty scored 21. Both operated spread-option offenses and threw a lot of screens and one-read passes.

Garrett Grayson: Greg McElroy.

Why: Smaller quarterbacks – 6-2, 220 pounds – whose collegiate success is a product of playing with top running backs. McElroy played at Alabama with two who were first round picks – Trent Richardson and Mark Ingram. Grayson played at Colorado State with Dee Hart, a running back who transferred from Alabama. When Grayson or McElroy faked a handoff, the defense followed the running back and left receivers wide open downfield.

Sean Mannion: Derek Anderson.

Why: Tall, slow-twitch athletes who can’t avoid a pass rush. Products of Oregon State. Backups.

Blake Sims: Tyrod Taylor.

Why: Small, fast-twitch athletes who can avoid a pass rush but can’t make accurate throws. Backups.

This article has 145 Comments

  1. Cody Fajardo: Colin Kaepernick

    Why: One of only two players with 9,000-plus passing yards and 3,000-plus rushing yards in a career.

      1. Do you believe that the 9ers should draft a QB? Should they try and pick one up in FA? Do you have a dark horse candidate, maybe from a smaller school?

  2. Good comparisons.

    I don’t think much of this class of QB’s either, but if Hundley is around in the 3rd it might be worth taking a shot.

              1. Really?

                Hundley: 67.4 comp %, 8.03 ypa, 6.04 TD %, 2.01 INT %, 150.8 rating.
                Petty: 62.7 comp %, 9.7 ypa, 7.34 TD %, 1.18 INT %, 166 rating.

              2. I’m not convinced about which guy is better. I like both. They’re tough, mobile competitors who have strong arms. Hundley is a better runner and Petty is a better passer. Hundley is a bit erratic like McNabb.

              3. Would really like to see a pass distribution chart for Hundley. Seems like he struggles on throws of 10+ yards.

  3. For every rule .. there is .. an exception ..

    Grant sez:

    “….Neither had to throw into tight windows,…”

    No, you’re right about Alex .. he never .. had to ..
    but he did …. once … (that I can recall) ..

    and it was later dubbed … “The Catch III”

  4. Just heard on NFL Insiders that it is the consensus around the league Chudzinski will remain with Indianapolis because working on the same team with Andrew Luck would be the best path for Chud to become a head coach again.

  5. so you’re saying they’re no David Fales?

    Hundley is intriguing. He can play, and there’s something to be said for having a decent athletic QB on a rookie salary if you plan to win with rushing and defense. Agree with rocket – he has great value in the 3rd round – but he’ll probably go in the 2nd.

    Separately, can we now get Josh Gordon for an 8th round pick and a bag of slightly deflated balls?

    1. Separately, can we now get Josh Gordon for an 8th round pick and a bag of slightly deflated balls?

      No, but on the brighter side, the Baalke-York-Tomsulsa interview is no longer the worst look for a team this offseason.

      1. Gordon will probably out of football in the next
        year or so .. and then he’ll “learn his lesson”
        and start making videos doing sit-ups in his
        driveway, showing that he’s “ready”
        to make a come back ! ..

        Oh.. wait …

        That’s been done before ..right ?

  6. Saying Graysons success came solely because of play action doesn’t hold water.

    What were defenses scare of? The 30th ranked RB? A guy who only had 194 attempts all season? That’s the guy who defenses followed? The RB who only averaged 16 attempts per game or the QB that averaged 35 attempts per game and still completed 64% of his passes.? Which one was the bigger threat in that offense? Dee Hart scored all of 16 TD’s this year, Mariotta ran for 15 alone. I seriously doubt the defense biting on play action is why Grayson was one of the best college QB’s this past season.

    I know QB’s aren’t your strong point when it comes to scouting but don’t just make stuff up.

      1. Go look at the individual performnces, he was erratic and usually only showed up against the weaker competition. He had huge games against bad teams but even had bad games against weak ones.

        Whether the RB was having a good game or not Grayon’s performances are far more consistent throughout the season.

        Grayson lack of elite athleticism is the only thing holding him back from the #1 or #2 QB conversation. He has the intangibles that cant’ be taught, his slow release and lack of strength are both facets that NFL trainers can work with.

        1. That’s because defenses were geared up to stop Hart, not Grayson. Watch the games. Grayson’s big plays mostly came on play-action passes when receivers were wide open, just like McElroy at Alabama.

          Grayson played well only against bad teams. Utah’s defense and Colorado’s defense made him look bad.

        2. “Grayson lack of elite athleticism is the only thing holding him back from the #1 or #2 QB conversation. He has the intangibles that cant’ be taught, his slow release and lack of strength are both facets that NFL trainers can work with.”

          Wow, talk about ignoring history.

          Slow release+weak arm=Soon to be exposed through the draft process. Late round pick.

      1. Fales completed 68 percent of his passes against Stanford in his first game of Div 1 football. Grayson couldn’t complete 60 percent of his passes against Utah, Colorado, Boise State or Hawaii.

        1. Grayson is the 2nd best QB in the draft. He’ll be selected third probably in the beginning of the second round. He’s the most ready to start of the QB’s in this draft although I hope he goes to a team that sits him for a year.

            1. As we get closer to the draft and as his popularity becomes more widespread you’re going to try and raise that prediction to closer to a third or fourth round pick but I’m going to hold you to you saying he’s a 6th or 7th especially when he doesn’t make it out of the second.

          1. I’m not as critical of Grayson as Grant and rocket, but I’m not 100% convinced by him either. As Grant said, a lot of his best plays came on plays where he had all day in the pocket and WRs were wide open. Most QBs can look good in that situation.

            For me he is well in the conversation for 3rd best QB in the draft. But this isn’t a strong QB class.

            As for most NFL ready, I disagree. Winston is the most NFL ready.

              1. He lacks maturity. Just because he can handle the college game doesn’t mean he wont have a steep learning curve learning the NFL game. A person with the maturity level and non-football intelligence he appears to show usually isn’t the kind of person willing to dedicate their off the field life to learning their game once their in the pros.

                He’s not mentally ready for the NFL regardless of his level of play on the college field because he doesn’t show the maturity level that the position requires.

              2. He was able to come in and run a pro style offense at FSU well. He displays a lot of innate QB attributes, such as sensing pressure, knowing how to avoid it, keeping his eyes downfield in the face of a pass rush, anticipating throws, and going through progressions. That doesn’t happen by accident – he can clearly learn the game.

                EJ Manuel said as a rookie that the Bills offense was easier to learn than FSUs. While that can be put down in some respect to a stupid comment by a rookie, it is well known FSU has a complex, pro style, offense.

                His issues are off the field. While I agree those issues may prevent him from ever reaching his potential, he is more pro ready than any other QB in this draft due to the attributes he already possesses and coming from a system that is similar to the pros.

              3. He has on-field issues, too — turnovers. Name one successful NFL quarterback who committed 20 turnovers in 13 college games like Winston did.

              4. “Name one successful NFL quarterback who committed 20 turnovers in 13 college games like Winston did.”

                Drew Brees had 20 INTs his sophomore year, just like Winston. John Elway threw more INTs than games played as a junior and senior. Eli Manning threw 15 his junior year. Russell Wilson threw 14 INTs as a junior. These are all Super Bowl winning QBs, that threw a lot of INTs at some point in college.

                Dan Marino never won a Super Bowl but he’s regarded as one of the best QBs to ever play. He threw 23 INTs each of his junior and senior seasons. Drew Bledsoe was also a pretty darn good QB and he threw 15 INTs each of his last two college seasons.

              5. Brees’ TD-to-INT ratio still was 2-to-1 that season. Winston’s wasn’t close to that.

                Maybe Winston is the next Marino, but I don’t think so. Marino had the quickest release.

              6. Sorry, I was wrong on Brees – those 20 INTs his sophomore year aren’t the same as Winston, they were two more than Winston.

  7. I’m not excited about this year’s draft class. I might get more excited as I study the prospects, but as of now I’m hoping Baalke fills a few key needs, grabs a BPA (if any) and trades the rest to 2016.

    I wonder how underclassmen affect the talent pool.

    Year – Number of underclassmen
    2004-2011 (average) – 49
    2012 – 65
    2013 – 73
    2014 – 102
    2015 – 82

    82 is a good number, but are they mainly filling in for the record 102 that came out last year?

    I’m still stunned the 49ers couldn’t find a way to take advantage of the 2014 WR glut. I like Baalke’s drafts, but we all know WR is a weakness.

    1. Unlike previous drafts Trent will draft for need this year. No more drafting for the future. They need to have the team to do well as quickly as possible in order to mitigate any more negative repercussions to their decision to can Harbaugh.

  8. Jameis Winston: Ben Roethlisberger.

    Why: Both guys have cannon like arms and aren’t afraid to throw it up to make a play. Both guys prefer to hold onto the ball a little longer to let plays develop than take the check down option (until this year for Ben). Both guys are big bodied QBs that can absorb a hit and shrug it and are far more elusive in the pocket than you’d expect, enabling them to extend plays. Both guys are good at sensing pressure while keeping eyes downfield, and making subtle movements in the pocket. Both guys play their best when the game is in the balance, or the team needs them to make plays – they are gamers. As a result, both guys are winners. Both guys have questionable off field character, but are respected team mates.

    1. Winston is an inch shorter and at least 10 pounds lighter than Roethlisberger.

      Winston forces passes. He throws into double coverage.

      Winston did not play his best against Oregon. Far from it.

      Winston benefited big time from playing with Kelvin Benjamin in 2013.

      1. Name a QB that doesn’t benefit from have a big playmaker on their team. Winston is better than many starting QB’s in the NFL currently.

      2. They are both big bodied guys, no matter which way you look at it.

        They both force passes and pass into double coverage, though Winston is indeed more prone to do so. Will be interesting to see how Winston goes once he devotes himself to football full time, rather than splitting time between baseball and football.

        Yep, he lost one game in his career in FSU, and didn’t play his best in that game at all. He did however lead the team back to victory a number of times during the season by playing some exceptional second half football.

        You bet he did. Which QB doesn’t benefit from having a good WR group? Roethlisberger has benefited from having the likes of Hines Ward, Santonio Holmes, Mike Wallace, Antonio Brown, Heath Miller, Emmanuel Sanders, Martavis Bryant, Markus Wheaton… that’s a team that can scout receiving talent.

        1. Winston played for one of the most talented teams in college football. FSU went 12-2 under E.J. Manuel in 2012. Manuel’s performance in 2012 was better than Winston’s performance in 2014.

          Winston is reckless like Cutler.

          1. Yes he did. And he is a highly talented QB. His biggest question mark is his attitude, not his physical ability or his talent.

              1. People do question his attitude on the field though, and his ability to come up big in the clutch.

                Winston has shown he is a gamer, and he doesn’t drop his head after a bad play.

                If Winston never learns anything else about how to play QB, and doesn’t learn to be a little more careful with the ball (especially early in games), he’ll go down as a talented guy that never played to his potential. That is a possibility given his off field concerns.

                If he learns to harness his instincts a little, he could easily have a career like Roethlisberger.

                To me Winston is the most talented QB in this draft, but his character may hold him back. Mariota may end up having the better career if he goes to the right destination, as he has a much better head on his shoulders.

              2. Winston did not come up clutch in the biggest game of his life. Cardale Jones, Brett Hundley, Kevin Hogan, Jared Goff, Connor Halliday, Travis Wilson and Colby Kirkegaard played better against Oregon than Winston did.

              3. Yep, he had one game where he didn’t win, and guess what, he didn’t play well that game. Good thing no other QB has done that.

                One could easily argue winning the national title game in 2013 was his biggest game too, and he played pretty well in the clutch in that one.

              4. Who cares that he won a lot of games on a great team? So did Matt Leinart. Winston did not play well last season. He threw four picks against Florida and three against Louisville. Hundley played better than Winston last season, and Petty played better against Oklahoma State than Winston did.

              5. Are you comparing him to Matt Leinart?

                You don’t think he’s any good in the clutch because he didn’t lead his team back one time, that’s fine. Nothing I say will change your mind. You want to discredit his ability because he played on a good team, that’s fine too.

                I’ll just focus on what I see from him as a player. And he’s got plenty to like about him.

              6. No. You keep harping on Winston’s win-loss record. Leinart won 34 games in a row at USC. He was clutch in college, too, and he played better in his bowl games than Winston did. So what?

                Winning games as FSU’s QB isn’t a big deal nor does it predict future NFL success.

              7. I’m pointing out that he didn’t play clutch in one game. You are the one discrediting his ability to play well in big moments, but it happened just once in his career at FSU. It was a big game, but so was the one the year before against Auburn when he did perform well in the clutch.

                I am not predicting NFL success because of his record. Heck, I’m not even predicting NFL success. But in terms of which QB his play is most reminiscent of, it is Ben Roethlisberger. Sure, if you like we can agree he is a bit looser with the ball, like Cutler. But aside from that he is more similar to Roethlisberger than Cutler.

                If he wants to have the same kind of success as Roethlisberger in the NFL, he has areas of his game he needs to improve. No shock there. Will he? I’ve no idea. But his off field character issues are a big concern.

              8. He didn’t play that well against Auburn — 57 percent completions, 6.7 yards per attempt. And he had Kelvin Benjamin and the better overall team. That’s not clutch. If it was, Leinart would be clutch, too. He won games late at USC.

                The fact that Winston is careless with the football makes him like Cutler, not Roethlisberger. Roethlisberger’s INT % was 2.6 in college, and it’s 2.6 in the pros. Winston’s INT % is 3.4, like Cutler.

              9. Winston didn’t play well against Auburn… until the 4th quarter. His last two drives he led for TDs, which won the game. Say what you like, he has a knack for playing his best football when it matters, with the exception of his last game.

                You are focusing on one thing and saying they are the same player because of it. Winston shares more in common with Roethlisberger than Cutler.

              10. And I am far from the only person that sees it. Winston gets compared to Roethlisberger all the time.

              11. I can see the Roethlisberget comparison, but Winston was really careless this season which is not a good trait coming out of College.

                He’s a better prospect than Mariota though.

              12. Agree with everything you just said here rocket.

                He’ll benefit from playing under a good OC in Koetter, with two good big-bodied WRs with speed in Vincent Jackson and Mike Evans. If Doug Martin returns to form, and they draft/ sign a decent slot WR and good OT, that offense could be very dangerous.

              13. “Roethlisberger isn’t careless like Winston.”

                You might want to go back and look at Roethlisberger’s early NFL career. He didn’t have a really high number of INTs his first two years simply because the Steelers limited how much he passed. The four years following that, when he was being asked to pass more often, he tallied 61 INTs in four years. An average of a shade over 15 per season. That doesn’t happen from being careful with the ball.

                From his 7th season on he has learned how to be more careful with the ball.

              14. Roethlisberger threw a lot of picks early in his NFL career. That’s understandable.

                Winston threw 18 picks in 13 college games last season. That’s awful. Even Cutler never did that, and he played for a much worse college team than Winston.

  9. If the 49ers are interested in using a mid round pick on a QB, they should see if the Bucs are interested in trading Mike Glennon. He’ll be a better prospect than what they can find in the draft.

      1. Exactly.

        If Chudzinski is named OC, I wouldn’t be surprised to see Jason Campbell brought in as the backup QB though.

      1. He is easily as good as the second tier QBs in this years draft, and could potentially be had for a mid round pick. But he has the added bonus of having two years NFL experience, including some decent playing time, and while he hasn’t blown the world away he has shown some promise.

              1. I see a kid that really wasn’t been given a chance to come into his own this past season. He has some needed intangibles to be a decent starter, but Lovie Smith was only interested in his guy. If you get the right coach for him, I’m sure he’ll improve.

            1. What he is is a QB thrown into a bad situation as a rookie that played quite well for a rookie – as Jack said his stats weren’t that dissimilar to Kaepernick’s in 2013 as a passer. He showed some poise, some ability to go through his progressions, and ability to make good decisions.

              Then this year he was ousted by the new HC who wanted his guy to play, so he never got the lion’s share of snaps in camp or the confidence of the coaching staff. When he was thrust into action he was ok, but nothing great.

              To think he doesn’t have any potential to build upon what he’s shown so far seems strange to me. It’s like saying Joe Flacco showed everything he is as a rookie. Flacco hasn’t changed much as a player, he’s just gotten more refined and better at doing what he does. Glennon for mine can be similar to Flacco.

    1. A quick view of his footage shows nice touch on long passes and a quick release. Good qualities, especially for a guy his size.

      I didn’t see deep outs or other high velocity passes. Not saying he doesn’t have them, but they weren’t in the highlights I saw. If he shows good velocity at the combine/pro day, he should rise.

      My favorite recent footage was Faulkner. Not sure why he didn’t stick.

  10. Winston reminds me of – -and don’t even think of going there — Geno Smith. There’s a certain disinterest in the finer points of the game that is covered by raw and erratic talent. The same as Geno, I don’t think Winston has a big career in the NFL. YMMV and no problem…

  11. Scooter:

    Somebody named Joe tweeted the following which CK7 retweeted:

    “@Kaepernick7 there’s a horse named after you in Australia. And it won! #kaepernickingworldwide”

    Is that one of your horses??

        1. Nah, I looked it up, its got some talent actually. 5 starts, three at major tracks, for 2 wins and a second. Already won nearly $100K in prize money. It was 5 to 1 in its latest win.

          Of course it would want to be pretty good – it sold for $400K in the Magic Millions sale two years ago.

  12. Interesting that Bill Barnwell credits Baalke for some of the early draft successes of the Niners while working under Scotty:
    http://grantland.com/the-triangle/bill-belichick-nfl-draft-new-england-patriots/
    “If any organization in football emulates Belichick’s philosophy of trading down and taking chances on players with short-term issues, it’s the San Francisco 49ers. General manager Trent Baalke might approach things that way because he has a deep, settled roster, but in 2007, he was still working underneath then-VP of Player Personnel Scot McCloughan, who had one of the best first rounds a GM can have. Drafting for a still-struggling 49ers team, Baalke drafted Patrick Willis with the 11th overall pick, and when tackle Joe Staley was still on the board at 28, he traded up to nab a player who would eventually become a star offensive lineman.”

    1. Baalke didn’t “draft” either guy or “trade up” either. That was not his job at that time. He probably had a lot of input from a scouting point of view.

  13. Vince Young: Colon Kaepernick
    Nick Foles: worth looking into since chip kelley needs picks to trade up for mariota who isnt as good as foles.

    1. colon: a punctuation mark or a part of my intestines.

      Colin: the first name of a quarterback that’s been to the Superbowl.

      edit function: something that Tim Kawakami has and this blog is missing.

      1. Yep, I posted that from my phone and noticed afterwards.

        What does everyone think of Nick Foles? If you could trade a 2nd round pick and Kaepernick for him, would you want him?

        I think he’s a natural pocket passer who can move a little. He’s got great touch, accuracy, and he seems instinctive and moves better in the pocket under pressure than Kaepernick. He does have a thin frame, so hopefully he’s not fragile.

          1. I’m always amazed at how some people don’t view a teams willingness to get rid of a productive player, at the most important position in sports, as a red flag.
            It’s all about Kelly’s offense and it always has been. He views players differently. I don’t think Mariota is a great prospect, but it would be intriguing to see him teamed up with Kelly again in the NFL. M

  14. Bryce Petty is awful, wouldn’t even draft him. Average arm at best and ridiculously inaccurate all over the field. He’s tough and a good leader but that’s basically all he brings to the table.

  15. Speaking of QB’s, who’s the guy working out with Kaepernick in his pics from today? Doesn’t look like Kurt Warner.

  16. Could be worst QB class in long time. I see Winston starting his career like Freeman (great first year) and ending similarly. Like Freeman, I don’t see a guy who is going to want to work hard year-in-year-out to be great. Mariota will work hard, just no sure any of these run-first, gimmick offense QB’s are going to ever be elite. Right now, there is zero who have made it to that level (and don’t put Wilson in that list, he came from pro-style program @ Wisconsin). Almost all seem to have questions about accuracy and hitting tight windows coming out…things you don’t easily teach.

    Personally, if I was a GM, I wouldn’t touch any of these “duel threat” QB’s like Kaep, Wilson (again, a scrambler who came from pro-style offense), Newton, Manziel, etc. in first round. Second? Third? sure. If I am drafting in top 10, it better be a QB first (not athlete). I want a Rodgers, Luck, Goff, Hack, etc…guys that may have other questions, but accuracy is not one of them (you need strong arm, but not Kaep arm). You have got to be accurate at next level or you have no chance of being elite.

  17. The #Colts are keeping Rob Chudzinski, source said. He’s going to become the associate head coach. #49ers and #Rams wanted interviews…… PER IAN RAPPORT

    1. Quite possible. But there are other things to consider. First, we don’t know how much Indy is paying him to stay. Second, the Rams wanted to interview him for OC too. So it could be he was never going to leave the Colts. But you are right in thinking that Jed and Baalke have poisoned the well.

        1. You need to work on your spelling. The head coach is running this search and this is the way he likes to have his name spelled — Tomsula, not like this – Baalke.

      1. 2George

        Good post…other factors might be that anyone jumping into the OC job is probably looking at it as a step to a future HC position. Who in their right mind is going into an interview for the job knowing he/she is going to have a QB who is at best a project . All of the receivers on the roster are virtually untried, because they haven’t had a ‘REAL’ QB throwing to them. You can’t teach instincts, and that he’s been throwing footballs for most of his 27 years without developing accuracy should tell you what the odds are that it’s going to happen suddenly because of Kurt Warner, Jeff Garcia, or the ghost of Van Brocklin. How is an OC going to display his ‘wares’ if his QB can’t go through his progressions. I think that the best option now is Geep Chryst….he’s aware of what he has on hand, and has his own ideas of how to work with his QB. Too bad about some of the others….but if you snooze, you lose.

        1. He had a lot worse than Kap in Cleveland and any belief he didn’t want to interview for the job because of working with Kaepernick is really complete nonsense

          He declined an interview years ago when Singletary was HC and my guess is he views the situation pretty similarly with Tomsula now HC.

          1. 2rocket

            O.K. what does that tell you ? HE GOT FIRED IN CLEVELAND! Complete nonsense , my fanny….try LOGIC. Would you take an OC position under Mike Singletary ? The man is working with Andrew Luck…unless you’re related to him, there’s no way you can say that Kaepernick will get you better results than Luck.

    1. cubus, I have a concern about Chryst too, but if it is him, hopefully early next season we will all be calling him The Savior.

  18. Well it turns out that Kiffin and Chudzinski both have the same agent. As per a Barrows tweet this morning:

    “Agents doing a good job leveraging 49ers OC search into raises for clients. Kiffin’s agent = Jimmy Sexton. Chudzinski’s agent = Jimmy Sexton”

    1. Sexton also represents Gase. Hmmm. This quote from Barrows almost made me lose my breakfast:

      “This is the second time Chudzinski has declined a chance to run the 49ers’ offense. He was an early candidate in 2009 when Mike Singletary was the head coach. Singletary had trouble finding viable candidates and ultimately settled for Jimmy Raye, who was fired a few games into the 2010 season.”

  19. George:

    It’s going to take divine intervention.

    About 6 to 7 weeks ago (I forget exactly which game), I wrote on this blog that I wanted the 49ers to let Chryst call a game instead of Roman. The reasoning was to see what he could do and if he could potentially replace Roman. Why doesn’t the team listen to us :). Grant should put a plug in for this blog during the pressers.

    At least one good thing should come out of all of this. Part of the problem with getting the plays run in time was that all plays had to go through Harbaugh. Doubt that will happen with Tomsula, so we should be able to get the plays called in to Kaep quicker and hopefully that will result in quicker execution.

  20. The offensive side of the coaching will need bolstering. If Chryst is going to be the OC, he will probably need help, lots of help.

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