Roman on Crabtree’s 60-yard catch: “Really saw something that alluded to that being a good play.”

SANTA CLARA – At his Thursday press conference, Greg Roman answered a question about Michael Crabtree. Here is a transcript.

Q: On Crabtree’s long play, did you put that in especially for him coming back? Was that installed last week just for that?

ROMAN: “A little bit. Yeah, we felt really good about him doing it. For sure. Really saw something that alluded to that being a good play. And it was really good by Colin and Crab having that Jedi thing going on that play. That was something that they talked about in the meeting, they got a feel for it and it happened on the field. That was really good to see.”

Here’s what Roman saw “that alluded to that being a good play.”

Trumaine Johnson was playing off Crabtree and had stepped inside to attempt to jump the slant route. This was bad positioning by Johnson. It left him vulnerable to the double move. A cornerback always should put himself in a position where the receiver has to go through him to finish the route. But Johnson stepped inside and lost vision of Crabtree while Johnson was eye-balling Kaepernick.

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    1. Maybe. It was a good call either way. Roman seemed to suggest they took advantage of something they noticed Johnson had been doing.

  1. I may be wrong, but it reads to me like this was something they saw him doing on film and worked on it in practice.

    “Really saw something that alluded to that being a good play. And it was really good by Colin and Crab having that Jedi thing going on that play. That was something that they talked about in the meeting, they got a feel for it and it happened on the field.”

  2. “A cornerback always should put himself in a position where the receiver has to go through him to finish the route.”

    I played CB in high school and D1 college and this could NOT be further from the truth. It totally depends what kind of coverage you are playing.

      1. He jumped the route Jack and got beat on a double move because of it. That’s something aggressive corners do sometimes. My problem was with Grants blanket statement that CB’s “always should put himself in a position where the receiver has to go through him to finish the route” is just wrong. What if he runs two routes like Crabtree did? Sometimes, as a CB, you give a WR inside leverage because all your job is to take away the outside and vise versa. Sometimes you have over the top help so you are supposed to play trail coverage and watch for any back to the QB breaking routes or back shoulder passes. I could go on and on and on. It just totally depends on the coverage called (man, zone, combo etc.). To say CB’s “always” are trying to be where the route runs/finishes is just wrong.

      2. Please go on Mike. If you want to throw out the “never played” stuff please take the time to explain it and show all of us how much smarter you are.

      3. Mike to simplify the discussion lets say the D is straight man. That would make Grants statement true but way over simplified. Sure a DB should force a WR to go through him to finish a route, the problem is you had better be right when you jump the route [and you do have to jump it to force him to run through you] or you are going to give up lots of TD’s instead of catches that do’nt lead to drives and force punts. Bend do’nt break means do’nt jump patterns very often.

      4. Professor Hammer, how many pages should Mike write? Double spaced??? References???

        Thanks for explaining it Mike. It helped a novice like me understand it better.

  3. on a double move route, i.e. slant & go, hitch & go, out & up or hook & go, Jerry Rice always said the key thing was to have a plan of escape because he did not want the DB, i.e. corner back, to block off his second phase of the route. if the DB bites and is clueing the QB’s drop and footwork and breaking after the QB stops his drop at 3 steps and it is a sluggo route or a hitch & go, he can make the receiver redirect if the DB’s position has obstructed the escape of the WR. At least the DB then has a chance to recover. However, if the DB crosses the face of the receiver and goes for the pump fake and thinks the ball is coming out of the QB’s hand, then the WR has a free escape for the second phase of his route. If you are a deep third defender or in man coverage, if you guessed wrong and jumped a phantom route, you would prefer the receiver to have to run through you rather than have a free path for a potential 6 point play.

      1. You are talking about how a DB should defend a double move in a man on man defense. Totally different from your blanket “always” comment. Clearly you guys cannot take criticism.

      2. You guys crack me up…

        and mike there’s a slight differnece b/w criticizing respectfully and attempting to belittle or put down someone by making the asssumption Grant has never played football in his life and has no idea what he’s talking about.

        Great stuff though :)

    1. Correct, but Crabs sure got his DB to freeze on a great shake without a pump from Kap and got way behind him without any top end speed. Crabs is a master of what you just described. Get the DB off the angle the pass will be coming from.

      1. I must have missed the pump, I though he did that Peyton ball slap thing with a flinch. The DB was reading Crab though, his eyes weren’t on the QB. I was actually surprised with the quick feet of Crabs on that play, the quickness was more impressive than the the worry of him looking pretty slow.

        1. That’s a good way to describe it. It was subtle, but Johnson was watching it. Go back and watch the replay. Johnson’s eyes were on Kaepernick.

      2. Head movement and body position through the route are key giveaways for WRs when running routes. The really good ones don’t have tells, and are able to use their body language to convince the DB they are doing something else entirely. It is way more important an attribute than speed for a WR. Crabs is by far and away the 49ers best WR in this regard.

  4. And it was really good by Colin and Crab having that Jedi thing going on that play.

    I think that he was referring to a mind meld here, and if that’s the case the case, it’s a Vulcan thing.

    1. Jags-Texans. That way you’ll have a better idea of who will have the #1 pick Teddy Bridgewater in the 2014 draft.

      1. don’t underestimate the draft stock of David Fales of San Jose State University. he does not get the media hype that Bridgewater gets, but watch him play and make the throws he does, and one cannot help but be impressed.
        Derek Carr of Fresno State also is a gifted passer.
        Both of these guys would be the talk of the town if they played at schools which were in the limelight.

      2. If Hundley declares for the draft, then I see him being the second QB to come off the board. If not, then Johnny Manziel.

  5. Here’s a question Grant (mainly b/c i’m bored) do you think with the Money they will be saving on Kaep’s contract extension, assuming they are going to save money due to his lack of production to this point in the season compared to hightened expectations, they will make a bigger effort to re-sign Crabs. He is without question a big part of this offense.

    Something else to consider is the fact that Aldon’s upcoming extension should be a lot less now too due to his recent troubles. So that’s money saved also.

    Maybe its too early to talk contracts.

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