49ers waive Jonathan Martin

The 49ers just announced they have waived offensive tackle Jonathan Martin. Erik Pears replaces Martin as the 49ers’ backup offensive tackle.

Last summer, the 49ers acquired Martin from the Miami Dolphins in exchange for a conditional 2015 7th-round pick. Martin started nine games and gave up six sacks last season when Anthony Davis was injured.

Martin is not strong enough to be an offensive lineman in the NFL. He needs to get stronger before he signs with another team. I would be surprised if anyone signs him this offseason.

    1. Surprise, surprise (not). Harbaugh had told Jonathon, “for as long as I have a job here, you’ll have a job here.” But, once Harbaugh bounced to MI, he could no longer protect Martin from all the team bullies. JM didn’t start that many games, but still gave up a team-high 8 sacks. The man didn’t seem to have a specialty. He couldn’t run-block, couldn’t pass-protect, and always stumbled around looking like he is still being bullied, belittled and attacked with name-calling. I hope another team signs him, maybe he will snap out of his victim-mindset.

        1. Andrew Brandt ✔ @adbrandt
          49ers release of Jonathan Martin has interesting timing. Probably tried to trade him (for anything) at league meetings, no takers.

          1. I believe there was a trade in the works, but they couldn’t settle on if it would take a 6th or a seventh round pick to make it happen. The Niner’s were only willing to offer a 7th rounder, but the other team wanted at least a 6th to take him off their hands.

  1. For the record, in one offseason alone (the last one) Trent Baalke managed to throw away a 7th Rounder on Martin, a 4th Rounder on Johnson, and a 3rd Rounder on Borland.

    To have simply waste draft picks is the only thing Baalke does better than accumulating draft picks to throw away.

    Lattimore, Borland, Johnson, Martin, Jenkins, and counting …. Trent Baalke is not a top GM in this league and would likely be on the hot seat on any team with mature and independent ownership.

    1. Baalke also got back a 4th and 7th rounder through other moves making that a moot point.

      How was he supposed to know Borland would retire.

      1. It’s not moot. Like I said, he’s good at accumulating picks, he’s just better at wasting them.

        As for Borland, he is on record as saying he knew he would only play 1 or 2 years in the NFL. The rest of the league knew that his lack of size was an issue. Baalke took a risk, and failed. Whatever you want to say about my points’ mootness, Baalke’s track record of failures weighs heavily against him.

        The good teams from 2011-2013 were McCloughan’s.

        1. Borland is on record with having told his family, during training camp, not NFL execs.

          He proved to be a heck of a player as well.

          Can’t see how you could blame that on Baalke, but i won’t waste my time trying to change your opinion.

          1. Baalke’s track record. John Schneider didn’t draft a midget to play a man’s game, didn’t draft a guy with broken shoulders to play ILB.

            And Jack, it’s not that you “won’t waste your time”; more like you know as well as anyone that Baalke has a terrible track record with drafting offense.

            1. No. It’s that i don’t want to waste my time. Part of why i haven’t commented much lately.

              Not intended as a negative towards Grant.

            2. -Gee, Iupati and Anthony Davis sure stunk as offensive picks.
              -So did Bruce Miller – what a joke.
              -Colin Kaepernick wasn’t drafted in the second round and didn’t take a starters job or win playoff games, let alone take his team to the SB.
              -Alex Boone was a terrible UDFA pickup.
              -Kendall Hunter never played well as a backup to Gore.
              -Daniel Kilgore can’t play center, at all.
              -Bruce Ellington, when finally allowed to play at the end of 2014, didn’t show anything as a WR.
              -Derek Carrier never showed promise at all as a UDFA TE. Cut him now.

              /sarcasm

              1. I think everyone on this site knows that I have always been critical of TB. However I don’t know how you can blame him for Borland. While this individual case should not be blamed on him, it does reflect and is part of a larger pattern of management which is. Still we need to be fair and not just jump on an individual when arguing a specific point serves our personal perspective. My perspective has always been that TB has wasted a lot of picks because the felt he had the luxury to do so. He could swing for the fences ( take risks in the draft ) because he had the luxury of having a lot of picks with few needs to fill. It isn’t just about how many hits you end up with. One has to factor the at bats and strike outs compared to home runs. I think we shall see the real TB in the next few years. My problem with his approach was the situation that the team now finds it self in. To many real needs with not enough resources to fill them. He should have attempted more singles when he had runners on base rather than swinging for the fences all the time.

                I think that a lot of you have given him too much credit for his successes and haven’t factored in his draft situations and the resources he had to work with.

                Now we shall see if the TB of the last few years was just a reaction to the power struggle between him and Jim. For the Niners and all their fans sake I hope it was just the latter. I am willing to wait and see what he does in the coming years. Still don’t like the guy. He is all about himself first. Just too disingenuous and manipulative for me but that should not effect a persons perspective of how good a job he does as a GM. We shouldn’t wish failure on someone just so we can say ” I told you so”.

              2. willtalk/pillowtalk – Who cares what you think?? You crossed the wrong blogger clown! I will stalk your lame posts from my grave…..You should call me the “night stalker” (Richard Ramirez). Lock your windows tonight and check under your bed and in your dark closet Pillowtalk……Keep calling me Crap15…..I love it…..Your so tough behind your keyboard in mommy’s basement…..You eatin frito-lay Cheetos for dinner again tonight troll?…..Vacuum those crumbs off the floor before mommy takes your Nintendo 3DS away again.

              1. Russell Wilson is basically Barry Sanders with Warren Moon’s arm. His job isn’t to slam his body into other men, it’s to elude them, and he’s the most elusive QB I’ve ever watched, and I’ve been watching football for 4 decades.

                So he’s a midget, too.

              2. Could you imagine if that Washington team was smart, held their draft position, and drafted Wilson in the first round?

                Of course it takes a lot of imagination to picture that organization(if you can call it that) as smart.

        2. E you are careless with the information available about how Borland went about making his career change. Baalke had no access to what Borland was thinking, and Borland outperformed what was expected of him in his first year.

          Distorting information to bolster a preconceived opinion is ineffective. Baalke may not be the greatest GM that ever lived, but to get rid of him because he’s not the greatest is a lot like getting rid of Jim Harbaugh because the owner didn’t like him.

          1. HTWaits

            I’m not distorting anything. Borland is on record as believing he would have a short career (1-2 years, and this was before training camp); that’s not to say Baalke should have known this, but Borland was damaged goods, like Lattimore, like Brandon Thomas, like Keith Reaser, but whose two shoulder surgeries were in his past. He was a tiny guy, though, and that’s why 31 other teams passed on him 2 times and 14 passed on him a third time. Everyone knew it, but Emperor Baalke thought he knew better. It’s a pattern for Baalke.

            I’m not saying he should be fired (and I’m not bothered that Harbaugh is gone either), just that he deserves heavy scrutiny this coming season.

            We’ll see what his draft picks are really made of: Hyde, McDonald, Patton, Ellington, Carrier, Thomas, Ward, Moody, Johnson, Reaser, Acker, etc ….

            Frankly, I’m excited, more so than I’ve been in a long time. With Harbaugh/Roman, we knew we’d face 16 games a season in which, if we got a lead of 7 points, our offensive aggression would go in the tank and we’d probably have a nail-biter with under 2 minutes left. That was not 49ers football. That was Singletary football, 1980s Chicago Bears football. So, yeah, I’m jacked.

            But about the scrutiny: I think Baalke has a lot of people convinced that he IS the executive of the year, every year, and that’s simply not true. It’s nice that he can accumulate picks; he just shouldn’t be wasting them on guys that either can’t or won’t play. Let’s be real about Baalke. Since 2011-12, his drafts have been disappointing, and aside from his deft handling of DBs, his free agency pickups have left a lot to be desired. (Fingers crossed for Torrey Smith).

            Final unpopular point: 49ers should sue Chris Borland for fraud. Since he knew that he wouldn’t play for more than 2 years, he should have excused himself from the draft, and entered the NFL as an undrafted rookie free agent. Because of the drafted rookie contract structure, which requires 4 year contracts, rookie contracts are actually worth a lot more capital than they’re worth monetarily. That is, the 49ers will likely have to use another top-3 round draft pick this year, and that’s entirely Borland’s fault; reimbursing the 49ers for the portion of the signing bonus he didn’t earn (75%) doesn’t compensate the team for the 3 years he didn’t fulfill the contract. And it’s not the same as if he had been cut, or forced to retire due to injury; if he knew before he signed the contract that he wasn’t going to try to fulfill its terms, then he signed it in bad faith. It’s a fascinating story, a fascinating angle of how the rookie wage scale can hurt teams.

              1. The term “hater” along with the term ” Ignorant” is one of the most misused words on internet forums. It is a word used by the lazy and mentally inept to devalue anything they can either not understand or have no logical response too.

                E—–Thought your post was really well constructed and articulated some valid points. However it was too long and incorporated too many concepts for some people who inhabit this site to be able to comprehend. So they have to devalue it by labeling you as a hater. Unfortunately most people can not recognize a ship is sinking until the water is over their heads.

            1. @E……You and I share (Ibelieve) the thought that 2015 is going to bring some ‘dead wood’ to life at the TE positions. I still believe in Vernon, Vance McDonald (big), and Carrier. My biggest concern is at QB whom we need to deliver the ball to these TE’s as well as Reggie, Hunter, Hyde, and whomever we play at WR besides Torrey Smith (DBG…?…Perriman…? With Peat blocking …..I trust in Trent! ‘Don’t know about the playoffs, but we’re gonna’ kick some very surprised Butts this year….

    2. Vance mac is looking like a bust. He definitely has not been worthy of a round 2 pick. Compare to his contemporaries and there is no comparison.

      1. VM had 2 receptions last year and fumbled on of them. Luke wilson , who also attended Rice U, was selected in the 5 round of the 2013 draft.

        1. Hi Matt. Do you still see Brooks or Vernon as players that can be moved or cut to create some more cap room?

          MM: Brooks more than Vernon. If Brooks shows up out of shape and has the same attitude issues that plagued him last year, then he might not make it to the regular season. I think Vernon will be on the team. The 49ers really don’t have a No. 2 tight end with concerns over Vance McDonald’s future due to how his back will hold out.

    3. E, you’re a hard task master. No one could anticipate Borland would leave football. The 7th round pick spent on someone else probably would have resulted in a guy who would have never seen the field anyway. I’d agree on Johnson; however, I look at him as a backup for Crabtree, and now that they’ve gone in another direction with that position, it makes sense to move on IMO.

      1. And Jack’s point which I had totally forgotten: “Baalke also got back a 4th and 7th rounder through other moves making that a moot point.”

      2. George- Ironically in one of my earlier posts I chided Baalke for swinging for the fences in respect to the draft. In his last draft he actually played it safe and used multiple picks in a strong draft to draft players that would actually make the roster. Borland being one of them. TB had made a statement that he would use multiple picks and with this many numbers some would be sure to stick.

        I think the problem might be the type of risks he takes. His risks involve players who drop because of injuries and players who the staff projects to change positions. It’s all about getting more value at less cost. It just hasn’t worked out for him. The only solid players he ended up with he paid full cost. With the exception of Lynch. Even the players that have made the roster have not turned out as well as there were projected too. I mean everyone expected Tank to tear it up once he became healthy. It has basically taken him two years to even get on the field, and we still don’t really know what type of player he will turn out to be.

        And while it is true that TB couldn’t have known that Borland would quit this year, Borland was one of the successful picks that what used to justify not moving up for a # 1 receiver. His not being the long term asset he was projected to be by most fans still impacts the over all viability of that decision.

        I think that the anti Harbaugh faction argues that he fell into an ideal situation with the Niner’s at the right time and he was given entirely too much credit for their success. This is not a totally over the top perspective. Well the same could be said for Trent Baalke in respect to his role as the teams GM.

    4. Nothing like a building a case based upon omission of unfriendly data. Even the best GMs in the league miss on picks and there are studies out there showing the bust-rate percentages in draft classes. Hint, it’s high, regardless of GM.

      Baalke has been very good at getting value for his picks, and trading up/down to acquire players or more picks relative to value. He has been very good at acquiring compensatory selections, and identifying UDFAs that can play. Not perfect, but one of the best GMs in the league in putting together a quality roster without mucking up the salary cap in the process.

      1. I would agree about his ability to juggle the cap in respect to free agency and resigning vets. He was also initially good at trading for an acquiring picks. Every person has positives and negatives. The idea is to recognize if the assets the positives bring out weight the negatives. I think that when people bring up the negatives it is only to counter those that focus totally on the positives. I remember a few years ago when he was labeled the draft Ninja because of his ability to acquire and stock picks. One of his pluses. The way he utilized those picks did not reflect the same expertise that he possessed in acquiring them. As Harbaugh was probably over rated due to the results of 2011, so it seems Trent was as well. One doesn’t have to be in one camp or the other.

        Their were people then and still some now that think Baalke is a genius. Total Bs. I find him very erratic. Very good in some things and pisss poor in others. Which brings up the question- do his positive compensate for his negatives? And can the Niners do better?

  2. Well, if someone was a real journalist, they would do a comparison of the successful not successful drafts between McKenzie and Balkie

  3. MaioccoCSN Matt Maiocco
    Cutting Jonathan Martin creates nearly $500K of cap room on the #49ers top-51 with his $1.042M salary replaced by someone making $510K.

    1. There you go. I didn’t really think Pears was much of an upgrade to J.Martin in quality, the $ puts it in perspective.

    1. I thought it was the pancake against Aldon Smith in the 2012 Miami game. If Martin could increase his strength, he might extend his career.

  4. Baalke’s being criticized for “letting a number of good players go.” In some of these cases — Crabtree, Iupati, and Martin — he’s cleaning house. Re Gore, Willis, Borland, Skuta, Culliver, maybe J. Smith, he’s had no choice.

    1. I’m as elated as everyone else that Gore, Iupati, Crabtree, Culliver, overpriced veterans, etc … are gone.

      Just imagine what this team would be if Baalke could actually evaluate offensive talent. Sure, he gets credit for Aldon Smith and Navorro Bowman, but where’s the talent on the other side? Kaep was Harbaugh’s pick. Who has Baalke taken/acquired? Ellington, Patton, Hyde, McDonald, Carrier? Could it be that Baalke will be vindicated this season, now that Harbaugh is gone, and the young talent can show through, now that Harbaugh’s QB coach is the OC? I certainly hope so, but I’m not holding my breath, not as long as Baalke plays by the Parcells rules, rather than the Walsh rules.

          1. HT, I don’t think there is a day that goes by where you don’t credit JH for everything. Since his brother is coaching with the Ravens at the time boldin was there your quick to assume that Jim engineered that move. The Ravens needed cap relief in a bad way while the niners needed another reciever to help Crabtree out.. It’s that simple. You seem to discredit balke anytime the situation presents itself.

            1. “I don’t think there is a day that goes by where you don’t credit JH for everything.”

              The use of the word “everything” shows either a poor or selective memory and/or poor reading comprehension.

              “You seem to discredit balke anytime the situation presents itself.”

              I think you must be mixing me up with E. I admit that I don’t give Baalke credit for getting rid of Harbaugh, that was Jed. I don’t think JimT plotted to get rid of Harbbaugh either. That was Jed.

              Earlier today I pointed out to E that Baalke shouldn’t be criticized for not being the greatest GM of all time. He is a very good GM, but not the greatest of all time.

              Beyond what I think of the way Jed runs him mom’s team. I’ve mostly been apposed to the overall direction the team is taking. I don’t care for the Harbaugh/Baalke links to the Ditka/Parsells approach, since I enjoyed Walsh’s teams a lot. That’s a minor point if that approach works.

              I think that Baalke and JimT are in a bad spot and I have a strong feeling about who put them there. And that same “who” keeps explaining why he didn’t fire Jim Harbaugh.

              Take or leave it friend, but above all enjoy.

              1. “I think you must be mixing me up with E.”

                I would edit this comment if I could because it was posted before I read E’s more complete view of Baalke. I apologize E.

        1. This is my favorite Baalke offseason so far, because it looks like he is tryin to adapt a little bit to the reality of having s slow and aging team. He needs to draft size and speed this year; we’ll see.

  5. It’s not fair to lump Borland into the pile of criticism on Baalke. Sure, there’s some cause for questioning, but I think his ability to construct a team is evident. And who knows, maybe Harbaugh really is to blame for the failed experiments with James, Stevie, and maybe to an extent Patton thus far. I’d also have to assume Martin was a courtesy to Harbaugh.
    Personally, even if proven to be somewhat tyrannical, I’d like to see Baalke have this year and next to put his vision together with a coach who’ll implement it.

      1. Lucky- I think the Harbaugh-Baalke combination was poison to begin with. I am not that eager to put the entire blame on Jed. I think Baalke was a major part of it as well. Baalke might indeed do better once Harbaugh is gone. I suspect that a lot of his actions might have been reactions to the perceived threat that Harbaugh represented to him. I feel you guys never gave me enough credit for recognizing the negative dynamics involved between Harbaugh and Baalke which to me was obvious from the very start of the 2013 training camp. They were just too much alike as type A control freaks, except that Harbaugh was not a politician nor was he devious. The very similarities that impelled Baalke to hire Harbaugh were the very ones that he later could not stand. The GM us usually the intermediary between the coach and they president. I suspect he had a major influence on how Jed perceived Jim. Baalke was the smartest one in this equation and added to this was his ability to be very manipulative and devious. It’s what makes him a very good wheeler and dealer. If he wasn’t hindered by his OCD blind spots as ( reflected by his stupid moves) he could be a very dangerous individual.

    1. Lucky….I was going to comment on this earlier, but held off ’til now. I can’t excuse Harbaugh from the “failed experiments” of James, Stevie, and Patton. Where I do agree that being at least somewhat tyrannical in possessing the power of who’s on the team, It was still within the power of the coach (JH) as to who played and who sat, which is the case of LaMike, Stevie, and Patton. This was, and to a degree, still is a power struggle carried on by Baalke and the deposed coach’s favorites. If there is more blood to shed, shed it and move on…this isn’t the war of the roses.

  6. What I find interesting is how so many people like to say Baalke was too arrogant to put the team that Harbaugh wanted together, to sign the players Harbaugh wanted, and that this was one of the reasons for the tension between the two men. Yet the same people will say Kaep was Harbaugh’s pick, that Martin was one for Harbaugh, etc.

    Could it actually be possible that Baalke did try to put together the team that Harbaugh wanted?

    1. Scooter- anything is possible. Possible yes! Probable No! All you have to look at is the musical chairs that was played with the 53 man roster during the 2013 season. That along with Harbaughs quotes during camp and the final cuts. The control that Baalke has over the team today is a reflection of the control he wanted but had to fight Harbaugh for back then. Baalke always had the control, Harbaugh success was becoming a challenge to him. Baalke was just smarter and slicker. Unless you have dealt with these sort of people you will not see it coming until it’s too late.

    2. There’s a big difference between picking Kaepernick on Harbaugh’s advise, and bringing in a cheap (Martin) backup lineman that Harbaugh thought they could fix. Based on 2014 I expected Martin to be gone this off season no matter who the head coach was. I also doubt that Harbaugh had any input on Kaepernick’s new contract.

      All that aside, I think there were several personnel choices that caused conflict between Baalke and Harbaugh — especially when Baalke didn’t compete to keep some free agents. I have no idea who was the “rightest” in those disagreements.

  7. They say that the NFL is a Copy Cat League. It seems that applies to owners too. Taking a page out of Jed’s playbook, Irsay has decided to let his HC play out his contract in 2015.

    1. Kind of. If Harbaugh was allowed to coach out his contract he’d still be coach. Jed artificially made Jim a lame duck a year early.

    2. “They” are a bunch of idiots. Oh so it’s a “copy cat” league? What does that even mean? As opposed to what…Do other leagues NOT try and mirror the success of their rivals?

      The only people who say it’s a “copy cat league” are just sheep trying to sound smart.

      1. Ernie- Or perhaps the type of people who own teams are very similar in personality and perceptions which might reflect a similarity in their actions in respect to their team policy’s.

        1. Exactly my point. It’s no different than saying the NFL is a “teams want to win” league or a “draft good players” league. Of course it is, just like every other league. Success is always attempted to be duplicated, in sports and in life.

          Stating that the NFL is a copy cat league is a cliche used by analysts trying to sound smart. It means nothing.

  8. I’ll give Jonathan Martin credit for one thing.

    I had always been down on Anthony Davis. I didn’t think he was that good. He wasn’t the tackle I wanted in that draft. I definitely thought he wasn’t worth the contract he got.

    Then I watched Martin play RT when Davis went down. I now appreciate and love Anthony Davis. If it weren’t for Martin, I may have never realized that Davis is actually a pretty good tackle.

    1. Euclidite – Good analogy. You don’t know what you got until it’s gone….Glad my ex wife is still gone though…..OMG, foxy but a complete nag!!

      1. hahaha crabs…

        I had a similar situation with my ex gf. Didn’t realize my current wife was the girl for me until I started dating my ex. She was hot, but so dang annoying. I dumped her and ran back to my first gf and married her.

        1. oneniner – …Leo just confused me with the ex, current gf, back to ex post. I’m bored at home on my 4th Stone IPA. Can you decipher Leo’s post for me? :)
          TGIF Leo!! You rock….Go Niners…….Tank Carridine is going to raise some hell this year along with Darnell Dockett!!!!! Lets go!!

  9. To Grant’s point above that spending #15 on an OG may be unwise or poor value I can agree in part. A serious franchise would hope to not be picking that high again soon, so take advantage now.
    A LOT is a high value position, so Peat would have value down the road for sure. In my mind it’s not a given he would step in and start at OG and then kick outside. If not he’s an expensive back-up for now but likely a sound investment.
    #15 might also be an opportunity for a DL stud for long term, or a game breaker at WR,CB, or edge guy.

    1. The best best player available if the team is really on it’s way back up. The best player to match a current need if the team is in danger of slipping back into the doldrums we just got out of four years ago.

      Steve Young thinks it’s easier to build a winner from a bad team (three or fewer wins) than it is from the middle of the pack. Maybe because you never get a good chance to find outstanding talent in the draft.

  10. I have to admit, when Harbaugh was officially out as Niner coach I was a trainwreck. I was overcome with tension, body aches, digestive issues, mood swings and occasional diarrhea.
    Yes, I turned to the bottle but that didn’t work. I read a Zig Ziglar book and I still felt useless……Then it occurred to me to go back to what always has worked in the past, when I lose all confidence and need to be inspired to carry on……..For me…. it’s Frank T.J. Mackie (Tom Cruise) in the “Magnolia” movie from 1999.

    Thank you Youtube, for providing free counseling therapy!! Now I can go on supporting Jed York, Trent Baalke, Jim Tomsula and Co……Go Niners!! Go #7!! and Go Blue!!

    1. Yeah Crab-amigo, laughter is an excellent tonic. Try the McKenzie Brothers for some beer related silliness in “Strange Brew”. There’s actually a hidden theme behind the laughs if you can recognize it; I didn’t the first time through. When I knew what to look for it was even funnier.

            1. Oh crap…..Lol…..I thought…nevermind bro. I’ve been away a few days. If you two blog legends recommend that movie. I’m on it…..That new Will Ferrell “Get Hard” movie looks hilarious.

      1. Bro T – I will check that out fo sure thanks!…Glengarry Glen Ross movie “coffee is for closers” is awesome too.

        1. Yeah, yeah CFC was giving the key line from the movie, which by the way made me smile. You’ll see why. And it’s a way less serious piece than Glenngary! More like Canadian Cheech & Chong, but beer not weed.
          Coffee is one of our most astute cinema and TV critics.

          1. Very funny movie and in the movie spectrum it’s probably on the opposite end of G.G.G.R :)

            The lie detector scene is a good one.

      1. KY – Really? I read his book “how to win friends and influence people” back in 1993 or 1994. I HIGHly recommend… No!!!….It’s a must read!! Especially if your lonely, broke or less than confident……I’m dead serious…..I still have the book.

  11. Hope for the best for Martin and us. Especially us. Replacing Martin with Pears makes me uneasy and hoping from the bottom of my heart that Staley and Davis miss zero games this season.

    1. Replacing Martin with Pears will probably work out as well as replacing Davis with Martin worked out last season.

      1. Midwest— It was concluded that what Martin lacked was a pair. So they went out and got a Pear to replace him.

  12. Martin had an attack of mono last May which apparently led to him becoming much weaker well into the middle of the season. His strength did improve late in the season, and I believe that Pro Football Focus graded him the best performing O lineman in one particular game. But he was always a little slow in pass protection, and is an average backup in the league at best, IMO. I recall banging my fist in frustration at his play back in college when he protected Luck’s blind side. He was grossly “over-drafted” as a second round pick.

    1. Nice piece Grant enjoyed reading it. Do you remember me telling you about how Perriman reminds me of Juilo Jones? I told you about him grant don’t forget. Lol.

    2. Breshad Perriman’s footage doesn’t show 4.24 functional speed, but he’s still fast for such a thick bodied WR. I like him. Strong.

      What I like is Perriman passes the fall-down test. That’s what I liked about Evans last draft. There were other big WRs, but when battling for the ball Evens tumbled less then the DBs. Even when he fell, he fell more controlled then the DBs. Perriman has a bit of that.

      If a team packaged their pick in about the 18-22 range with their 3rd rounder for the Niners 15, would you risk losing out on Peat?

      1. I like Perriman. I think he has terrific functional play speed. Really fast. I’m only saying it doesn’t look 4.24 in the highlights.

        Might be because of so many under thrown balls. He has to re-accelerate.

        1. I’m not sure anyone in pads runs a 4.24s 40, but from what I saw on film he looked as fast as anyone, no matter their size, is all I meant. There was a reason the DBs often gave him huge cushions.

    3. I don’t think you should assume he’ll(Baalke) bump up a particular receiver just because he clocked in an extra fast time after what he just said about the Jenkins pick.

      1. Coffe- You might be right. But Jenkins problem was that he played slower than he timed. He also had trouble maintaining weight in college. Both those things are reflective of a lack of and topped out strength. For a weak player the extra weight of gear would slow him down more than an average player.

    4. Grant

      In your article, you imply that only Cooper, Parker, and White are future number 1 WRs. Do you really think that is the case? I put Cooper at the top right now, with DGB above all the rest, and with a higher ceiling than Cooper. What about DGB do you NOT like?

      http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap3000000478327/article/dorial-greenbeckham-shows-no-1-wr-potential-at-pro-day

      (Full disclosure: I’m the guy that said Josh Gordon would be the best WR in the NFL, if he ever got straightened out. He was, for 1 year.)

    5. That’s dumb. ‘Baalke drafted someone the fans had never heard of…’ Dumb. We here were all over the conversation about Ward. I was promoting him, and I’m still not sorry.
      Anybody else remember when Grant used to ridicule people who quoted or linked to Bleacher Report?
      I do.

      1. Anybody else remember when Grant used to ridicule people who quoted or linked to Bleacher Report?

        Hahaha yep I do too. But I had forgotten it. Anyway, I actually think most of Grant’s BR articles have been pretty good. To me they seem to lack the blatant anti-49er bias he’s been known for locally. He’s still critical but it’s mostly fair criticism.

        1. Yeah, I’m just yanking his chain a bit. I’d agree pretty much on the tenor and quality of what he posted there. I don’t agree with some, but that’s different.

    1. This transcript would seem absurdly positive about Kaepernick to someone who never saw him in the 2012-2013 seasons. If you’ve had your eyes open and read a little bit about the guy, this transcript seems highly plausible.

      1. I agree and hope Gile is right. However, in the heat of battle Kaep sometimes has mind lapses. He’s also a stubborn guy. The combination of the two has led to monumental turnovers. We’ll just have to see how he plays this season.

    2. “In shorts, out there on the football field, he changed his motion and he’s very smooth,” said Gile, who trains passers in Arizona alongside partner Mike Giovando. “I’ve got it on film, and film doesn’t lie.”

      Dennis Gile on Tim Tebow after working with him in the offseason prior to 2013.

      1. In 2010, McDaniels had this to say about Timmy: “The football traits he has is the stuff you die for.”

        2013 Testeverde, “Chris and I looked at Timmy carefully, and we were both amazed. Everybody has been focusing on his throwing motion, trying to fix that, but nobody had picked up his footwork. His footwork was all screwed up. Chris and I looked at each other after about four or five throws, and we saw the same thing. We got his footwork fixed. His throwing motion is now a non-issue”.

        The speculations and promotions are fun, but in reality, no one knows how Kaepernick or the offense as a whole will look, until we get to preseason. Doom and gloom, or wait and see. Up to you….

          1. Football in shorts without real pressure doesn’t say much when a pocket breaks down often enough to always be on the mind of a quarterback. I remember Jim Everett of the LA Rams hitting the dirt in a solid pocket when he “thought” he was going to get hit by the 49er defense.

      2. Very true Jack. I take this stuff from Gile with a grain of salt.

        But Tebow has never come close to being as productive or efficient as Kaep has. Some would argue that Tebow is just unfixable. Kap has made strides these last few years, but has also regressed in other areas. But if he can clean-up the throwing motion and footwork, while also better working through his progressions, along with the fact that we are adding a lot of speed on the field to go along with one of the strongest arms in the NFL, I think we should see a lot of improvement.

        1. Leo,

          Understood, which is why I’ll wait and see.

          I’m just amused at the excitement Gile’s comments received from some.

        2. I’ve been watching NFL Replay games starting with 2010. I’m up to the 2012 New England game. One of the things that drive me and a lot of people crazy are the examples of missed touchdowns on long passes.

          Kaepernick threw a beautifully arched pass that dropped into the bucket to Moss for the first touchdown in that game. Great pass with great touch.

          Later he threw a long pretty flat bullet to Davis in the end zone. There was no touch at all and the ball came straight over Davis’s head and missed his hands by a couple of inches. It looked like a very close miss but in reality the thing was probably way to hot and there was no “bucket” at all.

          In both cases Kaepernick had time. Kaepernick could make a big improvement in his game if can learn to be more consistent about getting the right velocity and arch on the ball. For that to happen he has to be able to do it without thinking about it. That may be the hardest part.

            1. I’m not sure he “never” has caught a ball above his shoulders, but flexibility isn’t something he has.

              Walsh hounded Young. Montana and all their other QBs to throw catchable balls — on the numbers and one foot out in front.

          1. As any kid that played basketball knows… the more arch on the shot, the larger the effective target area.

            The basketball hoop doesn’t grow, but the area for a successful shot does.

            1. That’s like leading a faster receiver into an open area and letting him outrun the defense to a catchable ball. In the bucket!

              1. Do we really know that? If you’re saying that because of a perception that already exists doesn’t that just beg the question of why has he not improved if he already “puts in the time?”

              2. Or worse yet, if you are right and he is putting in the time then well…Grayson is looking extra good.

              3. Putting in the time on it’s own doesn’t say much, especially about NFL quarterbacking. Look at how long it took Steve Young and Drew Brees to get it.

              4. Let’s ship Colin to the Saints and see if he can match the same success. Want to take bets?

              5. CforC, according to Young’s reports of conversations with Brees it wasn’t as simple as you suggest for Brees to “get it.”

      3. We’d probably be wise to remember that there is some self-promotion and marketing for future clients within the public statements made by these well paid tutors. I’m not disputing anything in particular, just taking it all with a grain of salt. Actual improvement will be noticed by agents and coaches and GMs who would then be in position to advise (or not) a player to look into an off-season coach. The CBA no off season coaching rules enhanced this business niche.

    1. I’m going to watch the interview with an ear out for JimT ending declarative statement with “OK?” I’m checking to see if some writers are dropping them when they quote JimT. So far Cam Inman is the only one who hasn’t.

      1. Impressive session. Maybe they should get rid of the podium for home game press conferences and all sit around a table. Maybe the “OK?” tag that Cam Inman quoted only comes up in certain circumstances.

        One thing’s for sure, I’ll have no trouble rooting for JimT the man. If he can get the results he’s looking for from his staff, he should be able to take the team reasonably close to as far as the talent allows.

        1. I agree that it was impressive. He took all questions and was forthright in his answers to most, if I recall correctly. The anti-Harbaugh, as I’ve read written somewhere. I see no reason why he won’t get the most out of his coaches and players, on whom the team’s degree of success will mostly depend.

  13. What I asked in Matt Maiocco’s weekly chat

    “My only surprise about Colin’s off season mechanics and film study sessions are that it took him four years. That was until I heard Dennis Gile talking about the major changes in Colin’s throwing mechanics. That’s a huge risk.”

    “Is it possible Geep Chryst or Baalke at the end of last season said to Colin “If you’re going to work on mechanics, here’s a short list of guys we like” with Gile’s name on the list?”

    Matt Maiocco: “In talking to Dennis Gile and the 49ers, they tell me there’s been no contact between the sides. That just seems so bizarre to me. How can an independent coach decide unilaterally to completely overhaul a quarterback’s mechanics? I don’t know. The closest ties with which I’m familiar are with Trent Dilfer and Trent Baalke. Dilfer has worked closely with Gile, and I know Dilfer and Baalke are friendly.”

    However, Brotha Tuna, Leo, Razoreater, Jackhammer and others all make good points. There’s alot of self promotion going on for what might only be glorified workout sessions.

    1. It could be the Baalke instigated it because he was concerned about Kaep’s biometrics. Even if that is a “complete overhaul,” isn’t that what you want to see?

      Some of the more interesting quotes for me:

      “So he understands it, and it’s totally different because he’s never had a quarterback coach before, so he’s always just based his game off of how athletic he was, and his arm strength and stuff like that.” Never had a QB coach before?

      “His dad called me about halfway in and said that Colin had never really trusted someone like this, and that he told him that he trusted me with everything.” What?

      And this zinger —
      “I don’t think, there’s a lot more that goes into what happened in the past, which I will never get into, because it’s not for me to say. And there’s a lot that people don’t understand about what happened in the past. I think a lot of that will change now, and hopefully he can show people how good he really can be.”

      1. Thank you George…

        Yes I noticed these too while reading the transcripts and thought they were odd as well. As for the QB coach, maybe he was meaning to say he’s never had a coach in the offseason.

        And the latter comment was very interesting… What went on??

        1. There’s so much that doesn’t make sense… not just what Gile said, but Kaepernick’s development path in general.

          It doesn’t make sense that…

          – Gile could identify and resolve in ten weeks obvious mechanics issues Harbaugh, Chryst, and George Whitfield missed.

          – That Colin could go four years without having a formal offseason film study and mechanics development routine…. with millions and several careers at stake.

          – That Kaepernick would pick Gile without some back-channel guidance at the end of last season.

          – That ten weeks of new technique repetition at the age of 27 will overcome years of bad technique repetition that happened at a younger age (when brain-body pathways are more mailable).

          One explanation (I’m guessing here… have no idea) is maybe Harbaugh was hostile to the idea of outside help (was he happy Whitfield was in last season’s camp). And finally Baalke-Chryst gave the green light.

          1. For what ever reason, they made it very clear that Whitfield was there to learn and that he wasn’t coaching Kaepernick.

            1. I remember that. But Whitfield was also doing his broom and butterfly net drills.

              For some reason reporters said he was usually with the backups, but that was only for the open practices.

    2. I’m curious what the CBA requires in this case – we know the coaches are not allowed to talk football with the players during the offseason. Are the coaches allowed to talk football with player’s offseason coach? I know that Giles mentioned wanting to get Geep’s playbook which wasn’t available at the time. I was watching MM’s chat yesterday, I should have asked him so he could look into it.

    1. I think he’s just a guy; the blogger. He might be right, but I read “hunch”. I disagree that there’s a critical need to take a WR in the 1st. If a WR has the highest value, take him as BPA.

      1. Neither the Seahawks nor the Patriots had featured WRs the last two seasons in which each team won its respective Super Bowl, but I still believe the Niners need a guy like DGB or DeVante Parker. I believe WR is by far the Niners biggest need this offseason, and I also think Mr. Ego will want to take a guy this year since he missed out on Odell Beckham last year.

        1. That’s b/c of their QBs. The better your QB is as a passer, the less talent you need to surround him with.

          A great passer protects the OL by calling out the protections and getting rid of the ball quickly.

          A great passer goes through progressions early while the WRs are still running the pattern – not after they’ve finished – & has the ability to throw receivers open.

          the Colts got away w/ DHB as the team leader in games started & 2nd in targets among WR in 2013, b/c of their QB.

          Thanks to his legs, Colin is way more effective than Gabbert. But you need one of the NFL’s 2-3 best OL, run game, TE, and defense to win the Super Bowl w/ him. Not impossible, but very, very, very difficult.

          Vernon looked done & Vance is a bust, so TE is a bigger need, but the quality of the draft warrants picking up Anquan’s replacement over Vernon’s.

  14. Grant previously mocked Kyle Emanuel to the 49ers as an OLB in the 6th round. At the time I hadn’t really looked at him much and thought for a late round pick, why not?

    I’ve since been reading up on him and watched the limited game film there is on him. I’m going to go out on a bit of a limb here and say that despite playing DE in college, for the 49ers Emanuel could fit not only at OLB, but also as a strongside ILB in their 3-4 (though obviously not right away). As Grant said, there is some Dan Skuta to him, and I think he provides that same level of versatility. Its not as crazy as it sounds, this is a position switch that has been mentioned by Mayock and a few scouting reports out there.

    He’s a small school prospect with impressive but inflated pass rush stats. Short arms, but has a very high work ethic and displays good quickness and strength at the point of attack. Great hustle, and does a really good job chasing down plays and working through trash. From what I have seen and read, I love the way this guy plays and he’s a guy I’d be really happy if the 49ers drafted. At worst he looks like a guy that should be a heck of a STs player and decent backup, but I think he has future starting qualities.

    1. He’s got the size for an OLB, too beefy to be an ILB in our system imo. Yet the arm length is definitely an issue. I know Borland was a t-rex also but Emanuel’s 31″ arms are nearly a full 3″ shorter then the next shortest armed OLB on the roster in Ahmad Brooks.(Brooks is listed at 33.5″) The average arm length of our current OLB’s is just over 34″. Am I making too much of arm length? Probably but just ask yourself does Emanuel show enough special qualities for Baalke to be willing to step out of his pattern to draft him?

      1. Kyle Emanuel weighed 255lbs at the combine but he was listed at around 245lbs by North Dakota State. So I wouldn’t be surprised if he could lose say 5lbs or so, if the 49ers really wanted him to. At 6’3″ 250lbs, he’d be pretty much the same size as Shayne Skov. Borland was around 250lbs too, despite being 5’11”. End of the day I don’t think 250lbs – 255lbs is outside the range Baalke would look at for an ILB.

        When you watch him play he runs and moves like a LB. His combine numbers for speed and agility were in line with most of the top ILBs, and it shows when you watch him.

        I have to admit I really like the way he plays. As Harbaugh liked to say, a football player. They can figure out where he best fits later.

        1. Kyle Emanuel weighed 255lbs at the combine but he was listed at around 245lbs by North Dakota State.
          ————————
          Big difference, I was looking at the Nfl.com draft profile page and saw the 255. At 245 Id have zero problems with the pick.

    2. I also focused a bit too much on the olb suggestion when you were really painting him more as an ILB, /bonk. Skuta was 250 so it’s not out of line to assume that a 255+ player can’t work. I just think that when a player is significantly out of the normal range of other players at the same position there has to be something pretty special about them.

    1. Reaser, Acker, Millard… there is hidden depth on this team most pundits have no idea about. Can’t wait to see Millard catch a swing pass in the flat,then barrel over a hapless DB.

        1. I mis-read your comment at first. I read it as ‘I would like to be Sherman.’ I was thinking that if so, nobody here would talk to you.

  15. Warner spelled it out nicely.
    “Is 10 weeks enough time for you to change what you’ve been doing your entire career?”
    “And what does that look like when bullets are flying and people are attacking you?”
    “Have we gone far enough where that becomes the norm for Colin?”
    “You talk about a guy who has been playing the position one way for twenty-something years, and we’re (trying) to change him in three months?”

    I take this all as good news. It says the Warner-Giles-Kaepernick trio have realistic expectations, with an understanding CK (or any QB) will need continual refinement throughout his career.

      1. Your negating charges are confusing me? Are you taking one away or giving it to him? Here’s a 1, could be positive…could be negative I’ll let you decide.

        :)

    1. @B2W…..I hate to disagree, but I’m believing that Warner-Giles-Kaepernick ensemble is nothing but more smoke and mirrors to try to prop Kaep up. “Flag football” ?….What I see is that a large percentage of CK’s problems is the panic when he outguesses himself under pressure from a rusher (or 2, or 3). that’s not going to change with ‘flag football’….it takes leather balls to play football….no early slides, no running out of bounds…takes some hits and learn to love them….

      1. No you don’t. You’re belief is rooted in your disdain for the 49ers gunslinger. Nobody cites flag football as a propaganda tool for a NFL quarterback. That’s just silly. I took this as a fun story with a little intrigue into what’s been transpiring with his training. BTW, quarterbacks in the NFL are trained to slide and exit the field prior to taking the big hit. FYI, they don’t take kindly to their franchise quarterbacks taking needless hits….

        1. @Razor… My ‘disdain’ for the the 49er ‘gunslinger’ should just about cancel out your ‘disdain’ for anything non-Kaepernick….not ANTI-kaepernick. but. I will admit to being a non-believer in CK, and will probably continue to be until I see proof that he is more than Harbaugh’s ‘chosen one’. And please don’ t drag out that old saw …three NFC championships and one SB appearance…He rode the pine for the first 1 1/2 seasons, and missed on the third. As I said, there is nothing I would like more than CK’s success, but after cheering 49er QB’s since Frankie Albert, I am yet to be proven….

        2. Isn’t this the guy who went on record as saying that he could never forgive what Harbaugh did to his golden-boy Alex Smith. This is even after the team went to the Superbowl.
          Harbaugh is gone but Kaep still represents Smith’ demotion – the ax will always grind for some fans.

          Some fans will only target CK for all the ills of the 2014 season. It is what it is.
          Next up, the draft and hopefully more mocks leading up to it.

      2. OregonNiner: Disagree away. As most here know, I disagree with myself on a daily basis.

        Been waffling back and forth on the whole Gile thing from the start.

        Happy to hear CK’s honing his skills. Perplexed it took 4 years to start an offseason program. Happy to hear the training went well. Skeptical that it went as well as Gile says. Happy to hear Warner’s assessment was more realistic. Worried Gile changed CK’s mechanics so drastically that it conflicts with Logan’s training plans. Concerned Gile really didn’t change anything and us using CK fort self promotion.

        We will know for sure after game one.

        The mountain to an effective passing offense might not be as steep as we thought.

        49er fans love high percentage passing. Its the legacy of WCO. But with CK its a little different. With Colin its less about high percentages, more about Yards Per Attempt.

        I’ll gladly accept an improved completion percentage, but all Colin needs to do is have a high YPA+favorable TD/INT ratio. That worked great in 2012.

        1. Note: The 49ers have not run WCO in a long, long time. Baalke’s built this team on the Parcells model. Chew clock and pound the rock. Play action gouge passes.

          The missing element is a deep threat.

          1. For the love of Chryst, and Logan have elements of the west coast offfense within their schematic philosophy….

      1. Easy there Scooter. Do we have any updates on this dudes injury? Probable he’s good to go, but I haven’t heard or seen anything to suggest one way or the other….

        1. Its now been about 18 months since his knee injury razor (Nov. 2013 I believe). If it ain’t healed yet, it ain’t healing.

    1. Hard to tell because Bruce Miller’s receiving still weren’t used enough.

      Millard vs Texas (2012)
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rbv5aihfbrU

      I think Bruce is adept at blocking big linemen… but Millard is right on his tail in that regard.

      Millard’s got quick feet to seal off safeties and linebackers. Good receiver. Can run. A nice all around fullback. Rathman must be happy to get this guy.

      1. I’m confused. Is Millard slated to be a TE or a fullback? Or a hybrid? He looks like a good addition to the team at either position. I too would love to see him truck Lil Dick Richardson. Speaking of trucking Richardson, I think that feat has so far been the only worthy contribution from VMac since the Nners spent a 2nd round pick on him.Sad, because I had high hopes for him. Is this the year they give up on VMac and replace him with Millard? I’m hoping that one positive change from the Harbaugh regime is that some young ascending players might actually get to see the field now and then.

      2. Agree B2W,
        Miller is a proven commodity and continues to grow at his position given the fact that he played defense in college.

        Bruce Miller may be one of Harbaugh’ true diamonds in the rough. I think that Millard is a better runner than Miller, but Miller is a better lead blocker and is a proven and solid receiver already.
        Having said that, BMiller has not become the “SAK” player that this offense has sorely missed since Delanie Walker.
        That may not be any fault of his own because the offense under Roman became stagnant and went away from utilizing the SAK.

        We will have to wait to see what the new offense brings to the table in 2015.

  16. PFT reports that Jets owner Woody Johnson sold a NYC apartment for..(cough,cough)… excuse me (cough, choke, gag)…for..$77.5 million. Now I understand that there are apartments and then there are Manhattan penthouse apartments, but for that kind of money we could fix Sonoma County roads and re-fund school music programs. And yes, I do see the irony of someone in NorCal commenting on real estate pricing.

      1. Au contrere- I’d like him to fix his local streets and schools, and Jed & the Silicon Titans to help fix ours. I’ve been handling my own driveway just fine, the potholes reign on City streets and County roads.

  17. Why do I get this ‘a kid in the candy store’ feeling every time NewJim opens his mouth???

    “One of the biggest things I was excited about with Colin going down there was him spending some time with Kurt Warner,” Tomsula said. “That’s not as much on the field as it is just a mental approach to the game. Not that I have any problem with Colin. I think Colin does a great job. … But you’re talking about a (future) Hall of Famer.

    “You’re talking about the best in the business, one of the best there was at the position. So Colin getting to spend time with that guy, I was really excited about.”

    Is he going ask Kurt for his autograph………

    1. That kind of enthusiasm might be really helpful to any of the guys on the team that might be listening and might be believing all the garbage the know it all media guys are spewing about the demise of the Niners. What’s wrong with Tomsula being upbeat about his job? He’s apparently always been this way and he’s done a pretty good job with the Dline these last few years.

        1. The above is not intended as anything but lighthearted fun,I actually like our affable Everyman JT. Fingers crossed for his success.

      1. I’m very leery about a HEAD coach that gets starry eyed when Kurt Warner walks in.
        Is he going to pee in his pants when Joe Montana or Jerry Rice stop by???

        1. Starry-eyed? Really?

          He’s an enthusiastic guy that is backing his QBs decision to work with Kurt Warner. Tomsula will do the same for any of his players, just like Harbaugh did. You can bet if Harbaugh was still the HC he’d be saying pretty much the same thing. Would you be saying Harbaugh’s getting starry-eyed?

          You are reading way too much into it.

    1. @C4C….Not really, in that I’ve heard that 6-8 teams are standing in line to trade for the #2 pick if Tampa decides that trading would be in their best interest. I’d be watchful of the Eagles to offer Bradford and their 1st pick for the #2….a good quality pick for Tampa.

      1. Sorry OREGON, but I think that Bradford is fool’s gold. Great coming out of college but completely snakebit in the pros.

        I can’t think of any team foolish enough to take a chance on him. But than again, a fool is born every day and it wouldn’t surprise me to see a team sign him if he is in fact a piece of the puzzle in Chip Kelly’s master plan.

        1. @AES….It will be interesting to see, one way or the other just what Bradford brings to the party this year and why. If he remains with the Eagles, he’ll be a raving success….due somewhat to Chip’s genius….remember, Chip made MARK SANCHEZ look like a QB. He has played for no one in the pros but the Rams, which should make ‘Dante’s Inferno’ seem temperate. A lot of top players look pretty bad in their first couple of years, because the higher they’re taken, the lower the team that takes them…Chip says he’s gold….he’s gold. Now ‘fess up, AES you threw that bone out there just for me…Right? LOL

          1. Gee OREGON, whatever gave you that ideal, maybe it had to do with me actually calling your name (lol).

            I would like to see Bradford have a renaissance in his career ala Alex Smith, but AS had already proved his mettle before suffering a concussion.
            The Bradford signing in Philly (or any team if he is traded) is a cold risk because he hasn’t had any significant playing time in the last two seasons.

    1. Put in my request for tickets to the draft. I live 2 hours East of Chicago. Doubt I get them but if I do, I’ll represent. Plan on going to the 49ers vs. Bears game and taking my family….

      1. Razor-
        I heard very limited seating in the theater in Chicago, but the outdoor venue will have multiple tents and big screens and live music; “Draftstock” seems to be what they have in mind. Or to bring it more up-to-date, “Chi-chella”. Enjoy.

    1. @C4C….Not really, in that I’ve heard that 6-8 teams are standing in line to trade for the #2 pick if Tampa decides that trading would be in their best interest. I’d be watchful of the Eagles to offer Bradford and their 1st pick for the #2….a good quality pick for Tampa.

    2. @Bar None…About 6 monthes ago, I sent a blurb to Grant about a small school WR from here in the valley. He’s from Red Bluff, Calif., and he went to school at Southern Oregon University in Ashland, OR. He proceeded to break almost every receiving record in the school’s history…was picked up by the Jags as a UDFA, but wasn’t given much of a look. He is still in training, and is 6’2″ 198, and his 40 times are in the 4.4s. He has a highlite film, and if one of our ‘scouts’ on here could look into him, I’m sure he would be grateful….His name is Cole McKenzie. It’s really tough finding a REAL agent if you’re not from a D-1 school. I’d love to hear that someone on here could help him

    3. Bar None,
      This guy reminds me of one AJ Jenkins – enough said.
      There still will be some very good WR’s in third rd that could make the team.

      The signing of TSmith and JSimpson changed the WR drafting landscape that the team had a few months ago.
      O-line and defense will dominate this year’ draft in the first 3 – 4 rounds. BPA after the 5th rd.

      1. @AES….What with the FA’s we’ve acquired this off season, I think that I’ll agree that 2 of the first 4 rounds will be OL and Defense, but I think we’ll take one WR and a QB in the other two slots….trade down ?

        1. OREGON,
          I feel that they will trade down if there is a RB (Javorius “Tank” Allen) within reach. At this point, another RB might take precedent over a WR.

          I think that our WR needs may have been answered with the recent signings of TSmith and JSimpson. Add Ellington and perhaps Patton to the mix and our need for drafting a WR become low priority.

          I do like the kid (McKenzie) you referred too at Butte. Has a little of Jordy Nelson and Dez Bryant in him – in that he has deceptive speed and battles for the ball with very good timing at the point of contact.
          But having played at lower division schools already puts him at a disadvantage in the eyes of the NFL think-tank.

          Really looking forward to this draft more than recent years because we need players that can be counted on to produced much sooner than later.

    4. According to Walterfootball (+ some I’ve read elsewhere), so far the players that have or will meet with the 49ers are as follows:

      – Jay Ajayi, RB, Boise State (PRO)
      – Stephone Anthony, ILB, Clemson (PRO)
      – Arik Armstead, DT/3-4DE/DE, Oregon (COM)
      – Tavaris Barnes, DE, Clemson (PRO)
      – Ben Beckwith, G, Mississippi State (EW)
      – Cameron Clear, TE, Texas A&M (PRO)
      – Justin Coleman, CB, Tennessee (INT)
      – La’el Collins, OT/OG, LSU (PRO)
      – Ricky Collins, WR, Texas A&M-Commerce (PRI)
      – Quandre Diggs, CB, Texas (SR)
      – Stefon Diggs, WR, Maryland (PRI)
      – Phillip Dorsett, WR, Miami (COM)
      – Kurtis Drummond, S, Michigan State (SR)
      – Alvin Dupree, OLB/DE/3-4OLB, Kentucky (PRO)
      – Deshazor Everett, CB, Texas A&M (PRO)
      – Devin Gardner, QB/WR, Michigan (EW)
      – Garrett Grayson, QB, Colorado State (SR)
      – Dorial Green-Beckham, WR, Oklahoma (COM)
      – Randy Gregory, DE/3-4OLB, Nebraska (PRO)
      – Marcus Hardison, DT, Arizona State (PRO)
      – Josh Harper, WR, Fresno State (COM)
      – Sean Hickey, OT, Syracuse (EW)
      – Taiwan Jones, ILB, Michigan State (EW)
      – Jeremy Langford, RB, Michigan State (SR)
      – Marcus Peters, CB, Washington (COM)
      – Ryan Russell, DE, Purdue (EW)
      – Junior Sylvestre, OLB, Toledo (PRO)
      – Lyndon Trail, OLB, Norfolk State (SR)
      – Zack Wagenmann, OLB, Montana (PRO)
      – Clive Walford, TE, Miami (COM)
      – Tray Walker, CB, Texas Southern (PRI)
      – Keon Williams, RB, Chattanooga (PRO)

      1. What I find interesting with that list is there are two OLBs that are being mentioned as likely to be available at #15 (Dupree and Gregory). And they have also shown interest in lower round OLB prospects. I think it is safe to assume that an OLB is likely to be taken at some point, and the 49ers see it as more of a priority than many fans appear to.

        The only other first round graded prospects they are known to have spoken to are La’el Collins, Arik Armstead and Marcus Peters.

        Given the number of mid and later round WRs they are talking to, I also think it is safe to assume they will be taking a WR this year, but likely to be after round 1.

          1. They’ll likely meet with Peat during the pro day event they hold for players from the local schools or who are from the area.

              1. That way they don’t count against the official number of guys they bring in for visits.

            1. That’s if Peat attends. Sometimes the high profile prospects don’t come to the local pro day, especially if they are in the middle of doing visits with other teams.

              1. Over the last few years that’s when they’ve met with guys like Coby Fleener, Zach Ertz, etc.

        1. At the same time you also still have to sift through the flotsam. Does Baalke meet with players like that because he’s considering them at #15 or because he wants to be familiar with them in case one of them slips to the range they have assigned for them or is it pure subterfuge?

          I’m certain as well that we’ll take an OLB but I’d be pretty shocked if it was with our first pick.

          1. Baalke has flat out admitted he uses pre-draft visits and meetings to make teams think he likes players he’s not interested in.

            But given the number of edge rushers the team appears to be meeting with, it would seem there is some genuine team interest in taking an edge rusher. Whether it will be in round 1 or not, who knows?

        2. Our guesses are always just that, but I agree with your thought processes here Scooter. I also think you can’t have too many pass rushers in today’s game, especially in 4Q. Shopping high/low is smart in case some other team grabs your target. There is a lot of interest in edge rushers and so, much competition. With the talent level stepping down a notch somewhere around Pick# 13, its hard to accurately predict who will be there at #15, who might want that #15 pick too much, and who goes where after that point.
          As to WR, if a Game Changer falls to them in the 1st…..maybe.

      2. I found the 2014 list. Other then the now well documented disaster the team caused itself my passing on Murphey what’s the other thing that is interesting about this list:

        San Francisco 49ers:
        Odell Beckham, WR, LSU (PRO)
        Kelvin Benjamin, WR, Florida State (PRI)
        Xavius Boyd, LB, Western Kentucky (EW)
        Baushad Breeland, DB, Clemson (PRI/PRO)
        Preston Brown, LB, Louisville (PRI)
        Martavis Bryant, WR, Clemson (PRI)
        Jeremy Butler, WR, Tennessee-Martin (INT)
        Terrance Cobb, RB, Cumberland (PRI)
        Aaron Colvin, DB, Oklahoma (PRI)
        Laurent Duvernay-Tardif, OT, McGill (INT) (EW)
        Mike Evans, WR, Texas A&M (PRO)
        C.J. Fiedorowicz%, TE, Iowa (PRI) (SR)
        Khairi Fortt, LB, California (PRI)
        Ben Gardner, DL, Stanford (PRI)
        Jimmy Garoppolo, QB, Eastern Illinois (PRO)
        Ra’Shede Hageman, DL, Minnesota (SR)
        Gator Hoskins, TE, Marshall (SR)
        Stanley Jean-Baptiste, DB, Nebraska (SR)
        Storm Johnson, RB, Central Florida (PRI)
        Wesley Johnson, OL, Vanderbilt (PRO)
        Demarcus Lawrence, LB, Boise State (PRI)
        Cassius Marsh, DL, UCLA (EW)
        Jeff Mathews, QB, Cornell (EW)
        Demonte McAllister, DL, Florida State (EW)
        Jack Mewhort, OL, Ohio State (SR)
        Trent Murphy, DL, Stanford (VINT)
        Matt Patchan%, OL, Boston College (PRI) (SR)
        Calvin Pryor, DB, Louisville (COM)
        Paul Richardson, WR, Colorado (PRI)
        Shaquille Richardson, DB, Arizona (EW)
        Bradley Roby, DB, Ohio State (PRI)
        Kona Schewnke, DL, Notre Dame (PRI)
        Charles Sims, RB, West Virginia (SR)
        Marcus Smith, LB, Louisville (SR)
        Logan Thomas, QB, Virginia Tech (INT)
        Terrance West, RB, Towson (PRI)
        Albert Wilson, WR, Georgia State (PRI)

        1. Interesting, isn’t it – I’m sure there were some guys on the list they did actually like but for whatever reason were not in a position to take them, but goes to show you may as well completely disregard who the team meets with. You can’t even get a handle on the types of positions by round they might be after based on that list compared to what they drafted, its all over the shop.

          1. If nothing else a list like this can give you some names to plug into your mid to late round mock drafts.

          2. Scooter, thanks for the list. It is very interesting. They visited with some pretty good wide receivers last year, Evans, ODB and Benjamin were selected before the 30th pick, but Martavis Bryant wasn’t drafted until the 4th round, when the Niners picked Ellington. After one season I can safely say I would rather have Bryant than Ellington, whom they did not visit with. Also, Carlos Hyde is absent from the list. He was a player they wanted to hide their interest in, I assume.

        2. Here is the 2013 list from Walter Football:

          Jahleel Addae, DB, Central Michigan (PRI)
          Keenan Allen, WR, California (COM)
          Tavon Austin, WR, West Virginia (PRI)
          Jeff Baca, OL, UCLA (EW)
          Tank Carradine, DL, Florida State (PRI)
          Jonathan Cyprien, DB, Florida International (PRI)
          Quinton Dial, DL, Alabama (PRI)
          Zach Ertz%, TE, Stanford (PRO) (COM)
          Gavin Escobar, TE, San Diego State (PRO)
          Josh Evans, DB, Florida (PRI)
          Matt Furstenburg, TE, Maryland (PRI)
          Tyrone Goard, WR, Eastern Kentucky (PRI)
          Terry Hawthorne, DB, Illinois (EW)
          D.J. Hayden, DB, Houston (PRI)
          Gerald Hodges%, LB, Penn State (PRI) (EW)
          John Jenkins, DL, Georgia (PRI)
          Luke Joeckel, OL, Texas A&M (COM)
          Travis Kelce%, TE, Cincinnati (PRI) (COM)
          Zach Line%, RB, SMU (COM) (EW)
          Luke Marquardt, OL, Azusa Pacific (PRI)
          Tyrann Mathieu, DB, LSU (PRI)
          Jordan Mills, OL, Louisiana Tech (PRI)
          Sio Moore, LB, Connecticut (EW)
          Zeke Motta, S, Notre Dame (EW)
          Latavius Murray, RB, Central Florida (INT)
          Lawrence Okoye, DL, England (PRI)
          Ryan Otten, TE, San Jose State (PRI)
          Quinton Patton, WR, Louisiana Tech (COM)
          David Quessenberry, OL, San Jose State (PRI)
          Eric Reid, DB, LSU (VINT)
          Sheldon Richardson, DL, Missouri (COM)
          Jamar Taylor, DB, Boise State (PRI)
          Phillip Thomas, DB, Fresno State (SR)
          Shamarko Thomas, S, Syracuse (EW)
          Melvin White, CB, Louisiana Lafayette (EW)
          Duke Williams, DB, Nevada (PRI)
          Robert Woods, WR, USC (COM)

        1. Thanks razor.. Would be a soild vet to compete with whilotte. Would give time for a perryman or someone else time to sit.

  18. Here’s a list of Niners age 30 or older going into this season:
    Bethea 30
    Boldin 34
    Brooks 31
    Bush 30
    Dawson 40
    V. Davis 31
    Dockett 33
    Lee 33
    Pears 32
    Staley 30

    1. I’d say from that list, the 49ers can’t afford for Bethea, Staley, VD or Boldin to expire prematurely in the 2015 Campaign….

          1. amigo-
            “don’t ruin a good today by dwelling on a bad yesterday; move on.”
            Unattributed quote posted on fb.

      1. Safety might be quietly one of the bigger depth concerns.
        Reid – Concussions
        Bethea – Won’t be here forever
        Ward – A bit small to hold up to the pounding of being a safety
        Dahl – Is who we think he is

        The wildcard is LJ McRay. He was a hitter in college with good range. If he’s developing starting safety skills, the position is in good shape.

  19. Here’s a list of contracts expiring in 2016. I have excluded guys who I doubt will see the field (Cleveland, Holiday, Jacobs, and some others):
    Boldin
    Boone
    Bush
    Celek
    Cook
    V. Davis
    Hunter
    Jerod-Eddie
    Looney
    A. Smith
    Wilhoite
    Williams
    Wright

    1. @George…. Nice list…which brings to mind one name on it…Cleveland. If memory serves me, wasn’t he the TE that tore up the field during the exhibition season last year ? I was waiting to hear more from him….then nothing….Did he get injured ?, miss time, etc. ? For all of the bitching , moaning, and bellyaching we heard about our TE’s last season, I’d have thought he’d see the field more often….Anyone ?

    1. Using the Parsells model requires a team that minimizes pre-snap mistakes and pointless “over” aggressive acting out.

  20. I read that after Kaepernick’s morning strength-building workout, he worked on biomechanics from 10:30 to 1:00 o’clock. Imagine you were a shotputter or discus thrower trying to correct your flaws 10 weeks before the Olympics. I think you would be a lot more consumed by the biomechanics than just practicing 2 1/2 hours a day. Especially, if the main concern isn’t that he “gets it’ in Arizona, but how deeply the muscle memory is ingrained so that it will persist when the bullets fly.

    1. What’s can you cite to support your conclusion? Based your calculation of the timing of this training, the opening ceremony for the Olympics should be tomorrow.

      1. LOL, skeptical old school guy? Dang right!
        I kinda get this commenter’s intent, but I can think of a lot of examples of the Olympic contests not really equating an NFL quest. Lawrence Okoye is reaching his crux year. Skeets was an incredible 1.99/40 guy, but, eh. Herschel Walker was a track Great, a football Great, but his Olympic Bobsled Team did better without him than with him. (A cohesion factor no doubt; Walker was so much greater a physical specimen than his teammates that he was a lousy match. It gave the Take Off a herky-jerky motion that wasted milliseconds with its arythemic deviations from “the groove”).

  21. Htwaits and Tuna, if he only has a 10-week window to make core changes, it seems like he should max out his time each day. Many amateur athletes practice way more than that each day for years and tennis players and dancers learning a difficult choreography on a deadline and kung fu…. He may be overestimating the depth of his muscle memory because he gets it in the laboratory of Arizona. I’m an experienced athlete, that’s what I would do. How about you guys? What would you do?

    1. Helga-
      You make a solid argument, but I don’t think I have enough information to critique his time management; he knows what he’s trying to do. In thinking about your point I do have to smile and give you a nod, because Jerry Rice probably dedicated an extra hour a day catching passes after practice (task specific muscle memory) and then went and ran his hill. Musicians and dancers tend to put in more time, I have to agree.
      As to what would I do? Honestly, I subscribe to Fred Dean’s approach: He once said that sometimes he felt like working in the weight room, but that if laid down for a while the feeling would pass.

    2. I don’t have enough information either. My athletic ability never demanded that I do any more than Fred Dean, only I was at the other end of the spectrum of ability. At least I didn’t smoke, and I played tennis and basketball.

      It amazes me that every quarterback that’s ever played for the 49ers, except maybe Montana, have been targets for negative analysis. I’ve seen them all, and with a couple of minor exceptions, it’s never occurred to me that I was in a position to speak about what they were doing in off season training.

      Helga, at least you comments were thoughtful, but, you and I don’t know what Colin is doing with the rest of his day. I expect that after his physical training, and his two and a half hours working on his mechanics, he was probably working on film study and other mental work to “slow the game down.”

      What Jerry Rice did in training was great for his talent, but maybe not so great for Jerry the person. Few would give so much to any endeavor. As for Colin, he may not ever get his body to do “it” in a new way. It may also be more important for him to get to the mental state where “the game slows down.”

    3. helga:

      “He may be overestimating the depth of his muscle memory because he gets it in the laboratory of Arizona.”

      I don’t see any reason to put a ten week limite on the muscle memory work that Colin is doing. He may be planing to make it a part of his year around work for all we know. There is no reason to assume that he can’t also plan for occasional checkups on how well he’s doing the work either. Just a thought.

    1. Lets hope he can instill that mindset into Trey Millard. I’m really hoping the redshirts (Thomas, Acker, Reaser, Millard) show something.

      The previous year redshirt (Tank Carradine) finished well last season. I’m looking forward to seeing him contribute.

  22. Both players are only starting their third season but so far Darius Slay has proven to be the better CB over Jonathan Banks.

    1. I think it is too soon to say for sure. Slay was terrible as a rookie but playing on a good defense last year helped him find his feet. Meanwhile Banks started to come on last year, but is still inconsistent. I think both guys look like they could be decent CBs.

      1. Overall/Pass coverage scores 2013

        Banks: -8.9/-11.9
        Slay: -7.1/-3.6

        Overall/Pass coverage scores 2014
        Banks: -8.8/-3.9 (Essentially no change in overall score but manage to improve his pass coverage but couldn’t manage to get a positive score)
        Slay: +6.9/+5.7

        They’re not that close in their second year. Banks also had the benefit of starting more games in his first season but couldn’t take advantage of the extra play time I guess.

              1. If you say so. Only one of them ended up a top 20 corner according to PFF and it wasn’t Banks. Slay faced harder competition and still fared better. Slay held Dez Bryant without a catch in the wildcard game.

              2. On the same list they have Slay 19 they have Banks #93. Just a stat grading site but I doubt they still see it as “very close.”

              3. Only one of them played on the #2 ranked defense in the NFL, as well. That helps mask a few deficiencies.

                PFF is great, but its also a subjective system they use.

              4. I spent a moment finding the average QB rating each player faced over 16 games last season but it was a wash. Slay faced QB’s with an average rating of 90.2 last season and Banks faced 90.1.

                There’s no denying the advantage of being on a top rated defense as long as you also consider the player being discussed’s impact on that rating.

              5. Slay played well last year, even when you factor in playing on a great defense. And obviously he contributed to the team’s level of play.

                Banks played some decent football too, though there remains some inconsistency week to week. But he wasn’t helped by the play of those around him.

    2. The biggest problem with Banks is he is a downright atrocious tackler. In terms of coverage he fared pretty well last year.

      1. If the blog didn’t delete comments older then 6 months you can go back to 2013 when I said Ray Drew would be our replacement to Ray McDonald. Ok, I lie a tad. I originally said he’d replace Justin Smith but in 2014 I then changed that to Ray McDonald after Drew’s next year wasn’t quite as lights out as I had hoped.

          1. Clearly, but I felt a little extra twinge of pride on this one. If the 49ers take him he double makes up for the TM fiasco.

            1. For the record he went within 3 spaces to the spot I predicted he’d get picked. Just a slight variance in team.

    1. – I like Peat. I wouldn’t be sad if the 49ers got him at 15. I’d be temped to trade back a few spots for an extra 3rd or 4th with the hopes he’d still be there.

      – Nothing against Stephone Anthony. I need to do more ILB research. I’m just bummed th Borland retirement is making the 49ers miss out on a historically deep running back class.

      – Phillip Dorsett is a blur. He brings Tavon Austin-ish abilities without spending the super high draft pick. And there is nothing wrong with having two has receivers on the field at the same time.

      – Lyndon Trail is a good small school gamble pick. And of course those long arms. It would mean Lemonier is OTD. Might be the case anyway.

      – Use the comp pick on that USC running back you like?

    1. “The 49ers haven’t had a shut-down cornerback since Deion Sanders in 1994. That was the last season the Niners won the Super Bowl.”

      Took a shutdown CB to get the Pats their first SB win in 10 years. :)

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